TYLER DEMOCRAT
August 15, 1874

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 1, masthead
L. H. Beaird, publisher; Terms of subscription $2.00 per year; vol. 22, no. 33 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 1, c. 1
           
With Herndon in the field for Congress, we will be prepared to bid defiance to and laugh to contempt and scorn all the efforts of Radicalism in the First Congressional District. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 1, c. 1

County Letter.

                                                                                        Bascom, Smith Co. Tex.,         }
                                               
                                        August 10, 1864.                     }
Editors Tyler Democrat:
           
Sirs—Thinking that you might like to hear something from this quarter of old Smith, I propose to write a short communication, and if you think it worthy of publication, you can place it in your valuable Democrat.
           
We have just closed an interesting meeting; thirty conversions; twenty-six joined the church.  Dr. Finley, of your city, was with us and I must say that he is a master in Israel.  May God bless the Doctor, and spare him long to our church.  Brothers Bonner and Zachary were also with us, and labored hard for our neighborhood.  We have quite a number of religious and moral institutions at our place; prayer meeting every week, Sabbath School, Friends of Temperance, Band of Hope for the children, and last, but not least, we have our Grange, which we think is going to be quite a nice thing in the neighborhood.  We have about thirty members now, and expect others every meeting.  Regular meetings, Saturday before the third Sunday in each month, at 2 o'clock, P.M.
           
Cotton crops are cut short by the drouth.  Corn crops are good.
           
Having already imposed too much upon your valuable columns, I shall close for this time.
           
Come to see us.  Here goes for Herndon.
                                               
                                                            W. C. W. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 1, c. 2

County Convention of Smith County.

            This day, Saturday, Aug. 8, 1874, the county convention assembled pursuant to the call of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, for the purpose of selecting delegates to the Nacogdoches Convention.
           
Stephen Reaves, Esq., was called to the Chair, and H. V. Hamilton appointed Secretary.
           
The following Democratic Clubs were properly and fully represented:  Tyler, Lindale, Garden Valley, White House, Jamestown, Hopewell, Canton, Mt. Carmel, New Harmony, Mt. Sylvan, Starrville, Indian Creek, Flora, Seven Leagues, Bascom, Union Spring, Friendship.
           
A motion was carried that the chairman appoint five delegates to the Nacogdoches Convention from each Justice's precinct, appointments to be ratified by this Convention.
           
The following delegates were appointed and ratified, with power to select proxies in case any of them cannot attend the District Convention:
           
Tyler Precinct—T. R. Bonner, Dr. W. H. Park, Dr. H. J. McBride, L. A. Denson, Sawnie Robertson.
           
Canton Precinct—J. F. Overton, S. S. Johnson, J. J. Flinn, C. B. Bacon, R. H. Powell.
           
Starrville Precinct—Caloway Dean, J. M. McDougal, J. J. McDaniel, W. H. Marsh, J. P. Smith.
           
Garden Valley—R. K. Gaston, J. J. Adams, Jno. M. Davis, John W. Murphy, Zimri Tate.
           
Union Spring Precinct—W. J. McFarland, Ed. W. Smith, B. C. Rhome, Alf. Loftin, Capt. W. J. Smith.
           
The following Committee on Resolutions was appointed:  H. V. Hamilton, Dr. W. H. Park, Col. Caloway Dean, Col. R. K. Gaston, Col. J. F. Overton.
           
On motion, Convention adjourned until 2 o'clock P.M.
           
The committee on resolutions made the following report, which was unanimously adopted:
           
Mr. President:  We the committee appointed to draft resolutions expressive of the sentiments of this Convention, beg leave to submit the following:
           
Resolved-- That we endorse the administration of our State Government, under Governor Richard Coke.
           
Resolved—That we demand of the Legislature, on its assembling in January next, that provision be made for the immediate calling of a Constitutional Convention.
           
Resolved—That recognizing the distinguished public services of our present Representative in Congress from the First District of Texas—Hon. W. S. Herndon—during the past three years, we, the Democracy of Smith county, in convention assembled, fully endorse and approve the bold, energetic, impartial and fearless manner in which he has discharged the duties of his position.  Our confidence in his ability and integrity is undiminished; and believing that his efforts in Congress have been beneficial not only to his District and State, but to the whole country, we earnestly request our delegates in the Nacogdoches Convention to vote for him, and use all honorable means to secure his renomination.
                                               
                                                H. V. Hamilton,
                                               
                                                W. H. Park,
                                               
                                                Caloway Dean,
                                               
                                                R. K. Gaston,
                                               
                                                J. P. Overton,
                                               
                                                            Committee.
           
The Hon. W. S. Herndon, being present, was called for, and responded in a very able address of two hours length, reviewing his work in Congress in a most satisfactory manner.
           
On motion, the Convention adjourned sine die.
                                               
                                                Stephen Reaves,
H. V. Hamilton,                                                                                    Chm'n.
           
Sect'y. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 1
The Tyler Democrat, H. V. Hamilton, L. H. Beaird, Editors.
Office, North-East Corner Public Square, Opposite City Hotel.
Saturday, August 15, 1874 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 1
For Congress—Hon. William S. Herndon. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 1
Several towns report the reception of their first bale of new cotton this week.  We believe Tyler has had none yet. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 1

Speech of Hon. W. S. Herndon,
at Tyler, Aug. 8, 1875.

            The Democratic Convention of Smith county met last Saturday, to select delegates to the Nacogdoches Convention.  The delegates were elected and the resolutions adopted, as found in this paper, after which Mr. Herndon was called for and responded in one of those splendid and well considered efforts that never fail to carry convictions to the hearers of the truths uttered.  We cannot do justice to Mr. Herndon by giving a short statement of points made, but for want of space we can do no better now.  He said:
           
"GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION—I am profoundly grateful for this new mark of esteem and confidence, uttered by your unanimous vote in the resolutions just adopted.  To be endorsed in Congress is very agreeable; to be endorsed in the State of Texas and in other counties of this District is much more so; but to receive the unqualified approbation and endorsement of my own county and city, of the people among whom I was reared and by whom I am best known, is such a mark of esteem that I cannot find suitable language to express my emotions.  After all the calumny, vituperation and slander that the envy of some and the malignity of others could hurl against me, you, who know me so well, have solemnly said that it is false, and that your confidence now, as heretofore, is undiminished.  Gentlemen, I would not to-day exchange this expression of your confidence for the greatest office in the gift of the American people without it."
           
Mr. Herndon then gave a short account of his stewardship during the last session of Congress.  He discussed the civil rights bill in brief, its attitude before the country, his position and speech on the same, and showed some of the evil results that must follow its passage.  He then discussed the several bills for the payment of the debt due Texas, and the reasons for their not passing.  The direct tax levied on 5th August, 1861, and amended in 1862, which was made a lien on the lands of the several States, and which yet stands a charge against the Southern States, to an amount nearly reaching seven millions of dollars, and the prospect of securing its repeal.  His own bill on this subject, and the position it held with the committee.  He then discussed at some length his plans for the elevation and development of Texas, by opening a canal along the Gulf from the Mississippi River to the Rio Grande, thus utilizing over five thousand miles of navigable water in Texas and Louisiana, and making available to us the Mississippi and its tributaries, containing 25,000 miles of navigable water.  This, he showed, would place in market the timber of South-east Texas, and utilize the wealth of that section; that the engineers were making accurate surveys of this great work, ready for an appropriation next Congress.  Also the telegraph line for 1700 miles on the frontier, and the troops that are to be placed thereon, which is in process of construction.  He referred to the commission raised, their labors and report of twenty-eight millions of dollars for indemnity against the Mexicans.  Here the speaker gave a glowing description of the results that would flow from the plans already laid and partially executed, when fully completed; that when the Texas and Pacific Railroad and the International Railroad are completed, thus touching Mexico at Brownsville by canal, at Laredo and El Paso by rail, and the whole border by telegraph, we shall be in a condition to demand indemnity of the Mexican government for the past and security for the future; should they fail to respond, what would be our duty in this regard.  He stated that what we greatly needed was a stronger representation in the Senate of the United States.  The balance of power in the North and East is against us, and it was true statesmanship to increase our power.  He showed precisely how it could and ought to be done, and the immense advantages that must follow therefrom.
           
Again, Mr. Herndon spoke of the bill offered by him, to give a pension to the soldiers of the Mexican war, the chances for its success, and his reasons for urging such a measure.  He said there were more Mexican veterans in Texas than in any other State in the Union, and more in the First District than in any other in the United States; that in the payment of pensions the South, under this measure, would secure two-thirds and the North one-third of the whole sum paid, and that Texas, upon the estimate made, would receive over $700,000 per annum, which would give us impetus to our industry and commerce never before felt.  He described other important measures affecting our people and the South, with a familiarity of detail and knowledge of their bearings upon the country, that showed how much labor and effort had been used during his stay in Congress.
           
To say that our people were pleased, is not enough; they were profoundly impressed with the ability, the clearness and thorough understanding of the many subject mentioned by the speaker; and they were struck with the great ability of the measures themselves—for nearly every one discussed had some direct and immediate bearing upon the great interests of Texas.  There was not a man who heard that speech, who, perhaps, was not ashamed of ever having said or heard of others saying anything on the subject of the "salary act."  His efforts in Congress are worth millions of dollars to Texas, and our people are sensible of it now more than ever.  With one voice our people desire the return of Mr. Herndon to Congress. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 4

Tyler Art Gallery.
East Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
Curtiss & Smith,
Photographers,
and dealers in
Albums, Frames, Chromos,
Paintings, Stereoscopes, and Views, Etc.

            We take all styles of pictures known to the art—Photographs, Gems, Porcelains, Mezzotints, &c.; Photographs in India Ink, Oil and Water Colors.—33-6m. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 4

Valuable Plantation
For Sale.

            I offer for sale, for cash in gold, my residence place, near Marah's Mill, in Smith county, fifteen miles north of Tyler, and within two miles of the Sabine river.  The tract contains 320 acres of good gray land, 100 acres open, 45 in cultivation.  The place is in good condition, and title clear.  I will also sell my stock of cattle, corn, household and kitchen furniture, &c.  For further particulars, apply to
                                               
                                                J. W. Clinkscales.
           
August 14, 1874—33-2m. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 4

Notice.

            About 5000 acres of land in Smith county, improved and unimproved, mostly on the line of the International and Great Northern Railroad, will be sold in quantities and on terms to suit purchasers.  Also, two residences in the city of Tyler, handsomely located, for sale.  Apply to
           
44-6t.                                                                                       F. M. Hays. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 4

City Market
and
Provision Store,
South Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
F. M. Thompson,
Proprietor.

            Fresh meats of all kinds always on hand.  All kinds of Country Produce bought and sold.  Highest price paid for Hides. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

J. B. Douglas & Co.,
Receiving, Forwarding,
and General
Commission Merchants,
At Depot,
Tyler, Texas.

            Liberal advances made on Cotton and other Produce for sale or shipment. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

Drs. Goodman & Park,
Physicians, Obstetricians, & Surgeons,
           
Especial attention given to Surgery, Office at Haden's drug store and the Infirmary. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

E. Jones, M.D.
Physician, Surgeon and Accoucheur,

            Office at Rowland's drug store, where he may be found during the day, and at his residence at night.
           
Tyler, Texas, January 1, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

F. W. Holland M.D. |  Q. A. Shuford M.D.
Drs. Holland & Shuford

            Have re-associated themselves in the practice of their profession.  Office over Murphey's jewelry store. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

Dr. J. F. Reid.

            Offers his professional services to the citizens of Tyler and vicinity.  Special attention given to Obstetrics.  Office at H. H. Rowland's drug store, north side public square. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

Tignal W. Jones  |  John L. Henry
Jones & Henry,
Attorneys at Law,
and
Solicitors in Chancery,
Tyler,                                                   Texas.

            Will attend promptly and faithfully to all business entrusted to their care.  Special attention will be given by them to business of every kind in the Federal Courts at Tyler, and in the Supreme Court of the State of Texas.  Their office is up-stairs in the Erwin brick building, south side square. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

Richard B. Hubbard,
Attorney at Law.
Offices at Tyler and Lindale.

            Practices in the State Courts at Tyler, and the United States and Supreme Courts.  Office south-west corner court house. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

O. M. Roberts                                      Stephen Reaves.
Roberts & Reaves.
Lawyers.

            Will practice law in all the Courts in Tyler, Texas, both state and federal.  They will attend other Courts upon special employment.  Office—Up-stairs, north side public square, Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 2, c. 5

G. W. Smith.
Attorney at Law.
Tyler, Texas.
Office—Over Murphey's Jewelry Store. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
The health of the county is very good.  No serious illness reported. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
We understand that Dr. Young, the Temperance Lecturer, will be in Tyler the 3rd of September, prox. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Remember Rowland will sell smoking tobacco by the case as low down as it can be bought at the factory. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
"With all that's ours together let us rise," is the pathetic language of the thermometer—and it scrambles up to about 100. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
We hear that the Tyler band is practicing, and expects to compete for the prize at the Marshall Fair.  Blow your best, boys. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Mr. Stebbins, fashionable barber, on the south side of the square, solicits the patronage of the public, promising entire satisfaction to those who favor him with their custom. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
At the city market, Mr. F. M. Thompson has received a new and fresh supply of groceries, and can now furnish our citizens with anything they desire in the provision line, and at very moderate prices. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Mr. T. J. Stanford, of this city, is now in the market, purchasing fall and winter stocks for his house here.  He buys at close figures, and when his goods arrive, then look out for bargains. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Our readers will have to excuse the shortcomings of the DEMOCRAT this week.  Our Mr. Hamilton has been unexpectedly called away from the city on business, and we are consequently unable to present as good a paper as usual. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Our old friend, Uncle Billy Funderberg, informs us that a protracted meeting of ten days has been held recently at Pleasant Hill Church, one mile from White House station.  There were twenty-one accessions to the Church. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Do you want to buy a good farm?  Then read the advertisement of Mr. J. W. Clinkscales, in to-day's paper.  He desires to sell his residence place, fifteen miles north of Tyler, together with his stock of cattle, corn, household furniture, &c.  Terms cash in gold. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
We learn that an entertainment is to be given next Thursday night by the young gentlemen composing the cornet band, assisted by some of the ladies of our city.  As we have had but little amusement of that kind for some time, they will doubtless have a good house. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1

Important to Farmers.

            Mendez is now buying, at the very highest prices, all kinds of produce, consisting of nice peaches and apples, dried fruits of all kinds, eggs, butter, &c., &c.  In fact, he will give you the money on anything on your farm that you can't use.—[33-1m.] 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
About the craziest thing we have seen in a long time was a negro boy, brought before justice Smith, in this city last Saturday.  He was examined and committed to jail.  We understand that the boy's mother insists that she can cure him by causing him to drink a pint of sweet milk with a silver dime in it, and this dose she repeats every morning. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
Col. F. M. Hays publishes a card in our paper to-day, proposing to sell about five thousand acres of good land in Smith county, lying along the line of the International and Great Northern Railroad, and two good residences in this city.  He offers terms to suit purchasers.  A good chance for a profitable investment. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 1
           
The "Sociable" at the residence of our old friend, Julius Pabst, last Tuesday night, is said to have been one of the happiest occasions in the history of our city.  The host was lavish in hospitalities, and the numerous guests were in fine trim for the enjoyment of them.
           
And then our school boys and girls are having their full share of enjoyment during the holidays.  Last Wednesday evening they had a happy reunion at the residence of Mr. S. S. Gibbs. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 2

What Does Tyler Need?

            Generally, we answer, a great many things.  But if we were going to put forward her greatest present need, and the one most easily obtainable—dependent simply upon the will of her people—we should say concert of action and the encouragement of home industries.  That we have an intelligent community, cannot be gainsaid; that our business men—the merchants, the mechanics, the tradesmen, in fact, all classes, are liberal in their way, judicious and energetic, none will deny.  That, individually, they appreciate good schools, good churches, good behavior, a high moral tone in society, the thrift and prosperity of every laudable undertaking, we cannot doubt.  But there is a lack of unity among them; there is a disposition for every one to take care of himself exclusively; there is a too adherence to the old adage that "every tub must stand on its own bottom."  That is an excellent rule, if not carried to an extreme, but we submit that it never yet built a town into a city nor developed and perfected any great plan or enterprise in which men and means were necessary.  We talk about factories, but one man nor one hundred men, acting separately, cannot build them.  We have our hearts fixed upon the establishment of a University, but it requires united hands and united capital to establish it.  We know that trade would fain seek us from other contiguous sections of the country, but bad roads and a want of bridges are between us and our neighbors.  One by one, our merchants greatly desire that trade, but acting separately they cannot hope to accomplish what is necessary to secure it.  So in everything, until the truism applies to us with peculiar force, "divided, we fall."  To keep pace with the times in which we live, to develop our resources, to make our city and county as thrifty and prosperous as those around us, we must learn to work together for the accomplishment of a common purpose.  The merchant must help, not tear down; the mechanic must help, not abuse the merchant; the doctor, the lawyer, the teacher, the artist, the farmer, the man of every trade and profession, must regard himself as a part of one grand whole, upon whose united efforts depend the growth and prosperity of city and county.  And to more perfectly and certainly utilize all our available means, we must learn to encourage, with all our might, home industries and to keep our capital at home.  The mechanic who is already amongst us, or who may come here, must be supported and encouraged in his enterprise.  Instead of going to distant markets, and purchasing the very articles which he makes better at our doors, we ought to be willing to pay home manufacturers even better prices, knowing that the money we thus spend will soon come back to us again, in the regular course of circulation and trade.
           
Work together—be that the motto. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 2
           
We direct attention to the card published by Prof. J. T. Hand, in to-day's paper.  He states that the exercises of Charnwood Institute will be resumed on Monday, 31st inst.
           
This is one of the best schools in the State, and is situated in a healthy locality.  The school buildings have been finished and made entirely comfortable during the present vacation.
           
Prof. Hand will spare neither pain nor expenses to make Charnwood one of the very best institutions of learning.  He has labored in the interest of this community with zeal and energy for years, and deserves the most liberal patronage.
           
The next session will open under most favorable auspices, and we commend Charnwood to the consideration of parents and guardians, not only in Smith, but in surrounding counties. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 2
           
By reference to our advertising columns it will be seen that Messrs. Curtiss & Smith have established an art gallery on the east side of the public square, where they are prepared to execute all kinds of work in their line.  These gentlemen are well skilled in their profession, and those who desire good pictures will do well to give them a call.  They make all styles of pictures—photographs, gems, porcelains, mezzotints, &c., and photographs in India ink, oil and water colors. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

A Practical Question.

            When D. H. Jones makes better wagons here at home, why will Tyler merchants persist in bringing yankee wagons into the market?  You answer that the yankee wagons can be sold a few dollars cheaper than the home made ones.  Well, grant that that is true, and a sufficient reply would be that Jones' wagons are several dollars better, and beside, if you find a defect in one of Jones' wagons you have only to apply to Jones to rectify it, but your yankee manufacturer is beyond your reach.  But this is not all.  When you buy a wagon from Jones, the money is left in the country and remains in circulation among us, whereas when you buy a yankee wagon you send the money clear out of the country, and it is clear lost to us.  Again, if Jones sold one hundred, five hundred or a thousand wagons a year, he would be compelled to employ in his shops a large number of workmen, good mechanics, each one of whom becomes a producer and a spender of money here—each one of whom makes a valuable member of society; each one of whom helps to build up our city and county; each one of whose children helps to fill up our schools and churches.  But no; we all act as if we were under some peculiar obligation to kill out and drive away every manufacturer and mechanic who comes amongst us, and pour our money into the gaping pockets of foreign yankees, who find nothing so pleasant in return as to abuse our misplaced kindness, laugh at our stupidity and slander our good name.
           
What we have said here applies equally to all our home industries, and we have used Mr. Jones' name and business only as illustrating the lesson we desire to teach. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3
           
For wounds, cuts, bruises, scalds, chilblains, venomous stings or bites, and old sores, use Rhenol Sodique Parker & Helmbold's buchu , at Rowland's. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

Our Traveling Agent.

            Col. C. Matthews, Immigration Agent, has kindly consented to act as agent for this paper.  Contracts made by him will be respected by us. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

Ice!  Ice!  Ice!

            Ice, sold at retail, in quantities to suit purchasers, at low prices and at all hours.  Call at the Gem Saloon. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3
           
We received a communication from Mt. Lebanon Church too late for publication this week.  It will appear in next issue. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3
           
We have had no rain this week, and there is no prospect for any soon. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

County Letter.

                                                                                                Etna, Aug. 12, 1874.
Editors Tyler Democrat:
           
The "Etna Grange" was organized here on the 4th inst., with a membership of twenty-seven.  Officers as follows:  Alfred Loftin, Master; J. H. Bullard, Overseer; Joe P. Douglas, Lecturer; W. B. Langly, Steward; H. B. Butler, Assistant Steward; F. J. Hocut, Chaplain; Austin Rose, Treasurer; B. C. Rhome, Secretary; D. H. Smoak, Gate-peeper [sic?]; Mrs. C. E. Wilkinson, Ceres; Mrs. J. H. Bullard, Pomona; Miss Belle Clements, Flora; Mrs. F. J. Hocut, Lady Assistant Steward.
           
We think we will have a lively Grange here when we get in good working order.
           
The cotton crop in this section is very much injured by the drought; estimates are that it will take five to ten acres to yield a bale.  The corn crop is very good.  Local news is scarce and business dull.  Farmers are low spirited.  Everybody is for Herndon.
                                               
                                    Etna. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

Notice.

            At a meeting held by the Commissioners of the East Texas University, on the 6th inst., it appearing that Five Thousand Dollars had been subscribed and ten per centum thereof paid in cash; now, therefore, by virtue of the provisions of the charter of said University, a meeting of the stockholders of said corporation is hereby is called to meet at the Federal Court room, in the city of Tyler, at 2 o'clock P.M. on Wednesday, the 19th inst., then and there to elect officers for permanent organization. 
                                               
                                    Stephen Reaves,
                       
            President of the Commissioners of the East Texas University.
W. C. Robards, Secretary. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 4

Charnwood Institute.

            The exercises of the Institute will be resumed on Monday, August 31st, 1874.
           
During the present vacation the buildings have been ceiled and thoroughly overhauled.  For convenience, comfort and equipment, the Institute buildings are unsurpassed in Eastern Texas.  Our Furniture (Excelsior) is constructed with special reference to the comfort and health of the pupil, and the seat and back are so shaped as to secure ease to the scholar, who, unconsciously, is compelled to assume and erect and healthful position.
           
The government will be mild and persuasive, yet firm and decided.  The discipline will be only such as is indispensable to secure good order, and every pupil will be required to render prompt and unreserved obedience.  Those who can not do this, we earnestly advise to seek admittance elsewhere, as no one who refuses compliance with the regulations of the school will be retained.

General Regulations.

            We understand that the parent and guardian send their children and wards to an institution of learning that they may learn.  They expect them to make study their chief business.  Everything, then, which may interfere with regular attendance upon recitations and close application to study should be laid aside.  Attendance upon parties, and indulgence in public amusements are seriously detrimental to scholastic duties; also, frequent visiting and reception of visits prevent the advancement of the student.
           
It is the aim of Charnwood Institute to promise nothing more than it can perform, and in everything connected with its doings to preserve the strictest integrity.
           
It is our aim to procure the right kind of Teachers—those of unquestionable attainments in both the science and art of instructing.  It is our determination, by employing none but such as are qualified, to make the Institute a Seminary in fact as well as in name; and by meriting rather than soliciting, to make it the interest of all those who desire for their children and wards a thorough, practical education, instead of a few flimsy accomplishments, to patronize Charnwood Institute.
           
Under the amended school law, any University, College, or High School is allowed to blend the free with the private school.  Whenever and whatever funds accrue from the State will be made to insure to the benefit of the patrons of Charnwood Institute.
                                               
                                                            J. T. Hand. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 3

Gentle Spring is Here,
and so is our
New Stock of
Goods,
for the
Spring and Summer
Trade.
Our Stock is Now
Complete in Every Line,
and well adapted to the wants of the Trade.
There is No
Inducement,
either in
Price, Quality or Variety,
which we are not prepared to offer.
We don't propose to make leading articles
of Calicoes, Bacon and the like, by selling
them for less than cost, in order to induce
trade, but to continue to do the same fair
and square business we have done here
the last twelve years.  Our stock will be
added to constantly by
Fresh Arrivals.
We have now, as in former seasons the
best stock of
Fashionable Clothing
and
Gents' Furnishing Goods
to be found in Tyler.
Fleishel & Goodman.

Tyler, April 15, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 5

All Persons

Having books belonging to the Supreme Court Library at Tyler will please return them.  The office is now open to receive and file Transcripts for the Tyler branch of the Court.
                                               
                                                W. P. DeNormandie, Clerk.
By R. P. Roberts, Deputy.
August 5th, 1874 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Furniture!            Furniture!
Furniture!
           
The finest and cheapest lot of Furniture ever offered for sale in this market, also a splendid lot of
Crockery and Glass Ware,

at prices that defy competition.

Mattresses

kept on hand and made to order, and old ones overhauled, and all manner of

Repairing

done to Furniture, on short notice and reasonable rates, at the New Furniture Store House of
                                               
                                                            H. H. Hendricks,
                                               
                                                West side Public Square, Tyler Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Tyler
Infirmary.

We have this day opened our

Infirmary,
and are prepared to receive patients on the
following terms
All patients will be charged $3,50
U. S. currency per day, board
and medical treatment included.
Extra charge made for surgical
operations.
All patients will be require to pay
in advance.
Chronic Diseases
of every kind treated.
Surgical Operations, of every character,
performed, when necessary, including
those of the
Eye and Ear.

            Having no medical journal in Eastern Texas in which to publish the above card, we are forced to place it before the public through our city papers.
[2-1-1y]                                                                                                   Goodman & Park. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

G. A. Branard,
Candy Manufacturer,
and
Dealer in Fruits, Nuts, &c.
Candy and Fruit Stores on North
and South sides Public Square.
Parched Coffee, always on hand and
sold in any quantities desired.
Country Merchants
supplied with Candies and Choice Fruits, at
reasonable rates. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

I. O. O. F.

            Wm. Tell Lodge, No. 27, meets at Odd Fellows' Hall every first, third and fifth Saturday night.  Brothers in good standing are invited to attend.
                                               
                                                                Geo. Paulson, N. G.
A. A. Fielder, R. S. 

Rural Encampment, No. 19, meets every first and third Tuesday night. 
                                               
                                                                D. C. Williams, C. P.
Alf. Davis, Scribe. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

G. M. Johnson                          John M. Davis
Johnson & Davis
Lindale, Texas.

Keep on hand, and for sale at very low rates, a general assortment of

Dry Goods & Groceries.

Will buy, store or ship Cotton, and make liberal advances on the same.  We will also give the highest market price for

Green or Dry Hides,

and all kinds of Country Produce.
Give us a call and examine our Goods. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Tanyard.
Julius Pabst                                           Proprietor.

            I would respectfully inform the people of Tyler and surrounding country, that I keep a Tanyard in Tyler, ½ mile north-east of the Courthouse.  It is not a very large institution, but I always have on hand as much

Good Leather

as there will be a demand for.  I manufacture as good Leather as can be found in the United States, north or west.  I have worked in my profession all my life, and have been running this tanyard twenty years.  I wish the people to give me a call, whether they want to buy or not.  Come and look at my Leather.  I have sole Leather, harness Leather, upper and bridle Leather, Morroco [sic]; in fact anything you want.  Prices reasonable.
                                               
                                                Julius Pabst. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by F. M. Jones, and estrayed before John C. Allen, J. P. Precinct No. 4 Smith county, on 29th day of July, 1874, one sorrel Mule Mare, about 13 hands high, and almost 20 years old.  Appraised at $20.
                                               
                                    W. L. T. Burns, Cl'k D. C. S. C.
By Jeff D. Burns, Deputy.
Tyler, Texas, July 25, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Estray Notice.

            Taken by J. Willis Smith, and estrayed before Ed. W. Smith, J. P. Precinct No. 3, Smith county, Texas, two horses and one mule—one black ball-face pony horse, about 12 years old, branded 8 on left jaw; one bay pony horse about, 12 years old, branded T on each hip; one brown horse mule, about 3 years old, branded W with X just above it on left shoulder.  Appraised respectively at $20, $10, $25. 
                                               
                                    W. L. T. Burns, Cl'k D. C. S. C.
By Allen A. Letchworth, Deputy.
Tyler, Texas, July 4, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 3, c. 6

Notice.  Notice.

            Having purchased all the notes and accounts of H. C. McFarland & Co., all persons indebted to the same are respectfully invited to come forward and settle the same.  The books and accounts can be found at the old stand of H. C. McFarland & Co., west side of the square, where Mr. F. W. Petty will take pleasure in receiving and receipting for the same.
                                               
                                    H. H. Rowland & Bro. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

Drs. Goodman & Park.
Physicians, Obstetricians & Surgeons.
           
Especial attention given to Surgery, Office at [illegible] Drug Store and the Infirmary. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

E. Jones, M. D.
Physician, Surgeon and Accoucheur.

            Office at Rowland's drug store, where he may be found during the day, and at his residence at night.
           
Tyler, Texas, January 1, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

F. W. Holland M.D.                |            Q. A. Shuford M.D.
Drs. Holland & Shuford.

            Have associated themselves in the practice of their profession.  Office over Murphey's jewelry store. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

Dr. J. F. Reid.

            Offers his professional services to the citizens of Tyler and vicinity.  Special attention given to Obstetrics.  Office at H. H. Rowland's drug store, north side public square. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

J. C. Robertson                                                Sawnie Robertson.
W. S. Herndon
Robertsons & Herndon,
Lawyers.

            Will practice in the Courts of the 9th and 10th Judicial Districts, in the Federal Court at Tyler, and in the Supreme Court.  Special attention to Chancery and Bankruptcy, and to all litigated cases. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

Tignal W. Jones    |            John L. Henry.
Jones & Henry.
Attorneys at Law.
and
Solicitors at Chancery,
Tyler                                                                Texas.

            Will attend promptly and faithfully to all business entrusted to their care.  Special attention will be given by them to business of every kind in the Federal Courts at Tyler, and in the Supreme Court of the State of Texas.  Their office is up-stairs in the Erwin brick building, south side square. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

Richard B. Hubbard,
Attorney at Law.
Offices at Tyler and Lindale.

            Practices in the State Courts at Tyler, and the United States and Supreme Courts.  Office south-west corner court house. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

O. M. Roberts                                      Stephen Reaves.
Roberts & Reaves.
Lawyers.

            Will practice law in all the Courts in Tyler, Texas, both state and federal.  They will attend other Courts upon special employment.  Office—Up-stairs, north side public square, Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

G. W. Smith.
Attorney at Law.
Tyler, Texas.
Office—Over Murphey's Jewelry Store. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

T. F. DeWeese,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
Tyler, Texas.
Office—South-west corner court-house. 

H. J. McBride                          Jas. McBride
Surgeon Dentists.
Tyler                                                    Texas.
Office—Upstairs, Boren Build'g

            Will visit any part of the country when the demand for their services is sufficient. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

A. M. Murphey
[picture of watch]
Watch Maker and Jeweller [sic],
North Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.

            Repairing done on short notice, and warranted.  Dealer in Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Plated Wares of every description. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

John F. Haden & Co.,
Dealers in
Drugs, Paints, Oils, Glass,
Painters Materials, Toilet Soaps, Per-
fumeries, etc., south-west corner square,
Tyler, Texas.

            Physicians' Prescriptions carefully compounded at all times. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 2

I. W. Guyton,
Dealer in
Tin, Sheet Iron & Copper Ware,
Cooking and Heating Stoves,
Etc., Etc., Etc.,
North Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 3

Blacksmithing,
Horse-Shoeing,
and
Repair Shop.
by
George Adams,
Tyler, Texas.

            All work done in the [illegible], nicest, expeditious and satisfactory manner.

All Work Warranted. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 3

Cabinet Saloon,
Valentine & McDaniel,
Managers.

            Keeps constantly on hand all kinds of fine Wines and Liquors of every description.  Just received some imported Scotch and Irish Whiskies, Old Jamaica Rum, &c. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 4-5

1874                            J. B. Patterson                                  1874
Tyler,                                                   Texas.
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Family Groceries,
Tobacco, Cigars, Whiskies, Brandies, Wines,
etc. etc. etc.
Stocks Always Fresh, and Prices Reasonable. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 4-5

H. H. Rowland & Bro.,
North Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Paints,

Oils, Glass, Dye-Stuffs, Tobacco, Cigars, Pipes, Toilet Soaps, Fine Perfumery, Double and Single Trusses, and all other articles usually kept in a first class drug store.  Sole agents for Ayer's, Jaynes', Coyle's, and Harter's Family Medicines.  Prescriptions carefully compounded, at all hours of the day or night.  

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 4-5

J. H. Brown, Tyler, Texas                             Emory Clapp, New Orleans, La.
J. H. Brown & Co.,
Tyler, Texas.
$60,000 Worth of Goods!
To be disposed of at the most Reasonable Terms ever offered
in Tyler.
                       
Call and examine our                                           We also keep on hand

Mammoth Stock,                                                              Salt, Bacon,
which is being added to daily by fresh arrivals                        Bagging and Ties,
from Eastern Markets.                                                                      Wagons, and
                                               
                                                Farming Implements,
One Experienced Senior Partner                                      of every description.
is now Sojourning in the Eastern Cities and
attending in person in the selections, and                         We would call special
will remain until the purchases are comple-                      attention to our large and
ted, when we will be able to offer to the                          commodious Warehouse
public the most complete assortment ever                        and Cotton Shed, which
brought to this market.  Our stock will                             afford us extra facilities for
comprise in part                                                              storing and receiving and
                       
Dry Goods,                                             forwarding Cotton and
                       
Groceries,                                               Merchandise.
Hardware,
           
Queensware,
                       
Boots and Shoes,
                       
            Clothing,
                       
                        Notions,
           
Ladies' Dress Goods,                                          We keep on hand
                       
Fancy Goods,                                          Flour, Corn Meal,
                       
            Ribbons,                                      Wheat Bran and Hay.
                       
                        Laces,
           
And Trimmings.
                       
of Every Description.                                J. H. Brown & Co. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 4

Kidd & Clay,
Tyler, Texas,
Contractors, Builders,
and
Undertakers,

            Metallic and Rosewood Coffins always on hand, and coffins made to order.  Call at our stand, on north-east corner of the square, where we will always be glad to see our friends. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 4

Alabama Gold.
Life Insurance Company,

                                                C. E. Thames                                    President.
                       
                        T. W. Fowler                                    Secretary.
           
Capital Stock $200,000 in Gold,
           
Assets $100,000            "     "
           
Policies issued upon the most approved plans and payable in American Gold Coin.
           
Gen. A. T. Hawthorn, General Agent, Office, Marshall, Texas.
           
Col. C. W. Matthews, Agent for Smith and adjoining counties, Office, Tyler, Smith county, Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 5

Livery, Sale and Feed
Stable.

            Horses bought and sold on commission.  Buggies, Horses and Hacks always on hand.  Will send parties to any part of the country on reasonable terms.  Good Teams or Buggies for business or pleasure riding.  Omnibusses run from depot to hotels, private boarding houses, private residences, and to funerals, parties or any part of the city.  A good Hearse, accompanied with Omnibusses, Hacks or Buggies.  Drays, Wagons and Floats to do hauling from the depot or any part of the city.
           
Stable, south-east corner public square, on street leading to depot.
                                               
                                                Denson & Goodman. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 5

J. M. Hayden,
House, Sign & Ornamental
Painter.

            Graining, Gilding, Glazing, Plain and Decorative Paper Hanging and K[illegible]
All work entrusted to us will be

Promptly and Neatly Executed,

and Satisfaction Guaranteed.  Shop, north-east corner public square, upstairs. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

Charnwood Institute.
Tyler, Texas.

            The exercises of the Institute will be resumed on Monday, January 5th, 1874 with the same corps of teachers.
           
During the present week we have ordered a lot of school furniture, from "The Excelsior Manufacturing Company," Cincinnati, Ohio.  This Furniture is constructed with special reference to the comfort and health of the pupil, and the seat and back are so shaped as to secure ease to the scholar, who, unconsciously, is compelled to assume and erect and healthful position.
           
We do not desire to hold up gewgaws to the gaze of the intelligent and appreciative public, but to simply refer to the pupils of this Institution, who may be found from the Gulf on the South to the Red River on the North.  The young ladies educated at Charnwood Institution during the past fifteen years challenge comparison, in social worth, intellectual culture, and social position, with the pupils of any Institution in our good State.  We solicit patronage simply upon the ground of solid merit.
           
For the present, males to the age of thirteen years will be received in the Institution.
                                               
                                                            J. T. Hand. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

G. W. Humphrey,
Tyler, Texas,
Dealer in
Fresh Meats
of All Kinds,

And keeps constantly on hand and for sale at low rates in U. S. Currency (ten per cent. allowed on coin), a general assortment of

Shelf and Fancy Groceries,

                                                Bacon,
                                               
                        Lard,
                                               
                                                Flour,

And in fact everything in the way of
Fancy Supplies.

            Will buy or ship Cotton, and make liberal advances on the same.  Will pay the highest market price for Green and Dry Hides, Beeswax, Tallow, Wool, and all kinds Country Produce.
           
Is thankful for past favors, and hopes by constant attention to [illegible] to merit a liberal share in the future.
           
All goods delivered free of charge.
                                               
                                                G. W. Humphrey.
           
April 8th, 1874. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

Gem Saloon,
North Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
B. F. Scott                               Proprietor.

            Keeps constantly on hand the finest Liquors, Cigars, &c.  Connected with the house is an elegant Billiard Hall. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

Lone Star Route:
International and Great Northern
Railroad.

                        Leave Tyler going South, 4 P.M.
                           
"        "       "     North, 9:30 A.M.
           
Passengers going North, East and West should procure their Tickets via Troupe; at this point they get a sleeping car, which runs through to St. Louis.
           
Passengers for Palestine, Hearne, Waco, Houston, Galveston and New Orleans will make Better time and Closer Connections by this route than via any other, for all points in Central, Southern and South-Eastern Texas.
           
Passengers make close connections with trains of all lines diverging from St. Louis for the North, East, and West.
           
To insure a safe, speedy and comfortable journey, procure your tickets via International and Great Northern Railroad, which is the shortest, best and quickest route to all points North, East and West, as well as to all points in Southern States.
           
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars are run on this line.
                                               
                                                            H. M. Hoxie.
                                               
                                                Gen. Sup't. Houston, Texas.
           
S. M. Miller, Gen'l Ticket Agent.
           
[District D]                                                                                Houston, Texas. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

Wagons!  Wagons!
Buggies!  Buggies!
at
D. H. Jones',
Tyler, Texas.
Manufactured Especially for Home.

            My wagons are guaranteed to be of the best workmanship and of substantial and select timber.  My Buggies are fitted up in the latest and best style of finish.  Buy at home, with a home guarantee, when you can buy as cheap or cheaper than from any Northern manufactory.  Call and see for yourselves.
                                               
                                                            D. H. Jones.
           
Highest market price will be given for Cotton, Corn, Fodder, Hay, Wheat, Flour, or Bacon in exchange. 

TYLER DEMOCRAT, August 15, 1874, p. 4, c. 6

Tyler Marble Yard.

            The undersigned respectfully inform the citizens of Smith and adjoining counties, that he is prepared to furnish all kinds of marble work.

Tomb Stones and Slabs

gotten up in the neatest possible style, with any kind of device desired.
           
Having located permanently in this city, he appeals to such as wish to encourage home industry and enterprise to give him their orders.

Work Executed as Neatly

as can be done in any yard in the United States.  Persons wishing anything in my line will please call at my Yard near the Baptist Church, or Col. C. L. Dawson, who is my authorized agent.
                                               
                                                J. Phillips.