ARTICLES ABOUT TYLER AND SMITH COUNTY, TEXAS
1866-1867

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], January 5, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Tyler Journal comes to us enlarged and improved.  It is a fine looking sheet. 

DALLAS HERALD, January 6, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
           
"The Convention, in our opinion, should declare the ordinance of secession null and void."—Tyler Journal.
[Summary:  Long article from Tyler Reporter, supporting repealing the ordinance of secession rather than declaring it null and void.]

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], January 7, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
The Tyler Reporter gives as an account of the following bold robbery, which certainly shows a very supreme contempt for all law in the neighborhood of Van Zandt county.  It says:
           
"One of our citizens, the Rev. M. Carter, started his wagon and team, a few days since, in charge of a negro boy, to Mr. Coltharp's mill in Van Zandt county.  Near Hamburg, in that county, five white men, on horseback, attacked the negro, and drove him from the wagon.  One of the robbers then mounted and drove the wagon some distance from the road into the woods, where the mules, six in number, were cut out and driven away.  Such occurrences call for the immediate organization of the people of each neighborhood into police companies, for the purpose of approaching these villains.  Let the citizens quietly organize themselves and always be ready to pursue such miscreants and bring them to justice.  Such an organization exists in Tyler under the control of our city Marshal, and we recommend similar organizations elsewhere."
           
In speaking of a mail route, the Reporter says:
           
We understand that Messrs. Sawyer & Co., will open a stage communication between this place and Marshall in a few days.  The line will extend from the latter place to Crockett, via this place.  We feel much gratified at the prospect of being placed in communication with the outer world.  Messrs. Sawyer & co., are entitled to the congratulations of our people for their energy and enterprise.  Our people should do everything in their power to aid this enterprise, as the Government pay is not sufficiently remunerative. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], January 12, 1866, p. 4, c. 1
[Summary:  "A Fragment" by Mollie E. Moore] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], February 8, 1866, p. 4, c. 3
           
Watch that Southern man who rejoices over the present state of things!  The Federal troo0ps that we have met with don't trust him.  They respect the man who boldly declares his attachment to the Southern cause.—Goliad Intelligencer.
           
The Federals are right; nobody can trust him; there is no manhood in him:  whatever may be the facts the man who does not love his own people and his own country better than any other people and his own country better than any other people or country, is not to be trusted.  If the word traitor has a meaning it means that man.—Tyles [sic] Reporter. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], February 8, 1866, p. 5, c. 1
           
The Freedmen.—We are pleased to see that nearly all the freedmen, who have been frequenting our streets for months have gone back to their old vocation on the farms.  We and them [sic] animated with the hope of accumulating fortunes very rapidly, and we expect to see them do tolerably well, as laborers, during this year, but we fear that when they foot up their year's operations next Christmas, and end they have left but a small sum in their favor, they will in many instances, become discouraged.  There is a class too who work now from necessity, and when at the end of the year they find a balance of cash on hand, they will refuse to work until they have indulged their appetites in consuming their spare cash.  This will make farming a precarious business hereafter.
           
Most of our farmers have engaged to give their negroes a portion of the crop for services, which may stimulate them to do better than they otherwise would.—Tyler (Texas) Reporter, 10th. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], February 9, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
It is stated that Col. G. W. Chilton was arrested on a charge of having participated in the hanging of some one on the Rio Grande during the war.  We are informed that after his arrest and departure from Tyler, his horse came back, and consequently much uneasiness was felt in regard to his safety.  We cannot believe that, during the war, Col. C. was guilty of any conduct unworthy of a soldier, and sincerely trust that the may be soon set at liberty. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], February 15, 1866, p. 1, c. 4
           
The District Court for Smith county was in session last week, and from what we learn from the Tyler papers, will continue in session a couple of weeks longer.  The Reporter says Judge Cooper delivered a very able charge to the Grand Jury.  The Journal speaks of Whitmore, the District Attorney, in the highest terms as a faithful officer.—Clipper. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], February 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
From the Tyler Reporter of the 31st, we learn that Maj. G. W. Chilton of that place was arrested on the 30th, by U. S. Cavalry—cause of arrest unknown.  Strange proceedings—arrest, imprison, hang; guilty or not guilty the work of reconstruction must go on.  How we love this land of liberty.—Henderson Times.  

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], February 16, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
Our sanctum has been enlivened, during the past week, by the presence and genial smiles of several warm friends.  Among them, Col. Hubbard, of Tyler, a gallant soldier, finished orator, and accomplished gentleman.  We were gratified to see him looking so well. 

DALLAS HERALD, February 17, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Tyler Journal learns that W. S. D. Whittaker of Starville [sic], Smith county, was killed there on the 14th ult., by one Funderberg of the same place.  The difficulty originated in a pecuniary settlement.
           
We have been informed that Judge John H. Reagan still holds to the vows expressed in his Fort Warren letter.  We are pained to know that the man who had our love and confidence as a people, should accept a position and advocate principles so completely at variance with every idea of Southern civilization.  We hope our information is incorrect.—Tyler Reporter.
           
CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE LAW MAKING GREEN-BACK A LEGAL TENDER.—Judge Cooper decided a case a few days ago, in the District Court of this place, involving the question of the constitutionality of the congressional law making U. S. paper currency a legal tender.  The question was ably discussed—Col. M. A. Long for and Col. S. P. Donley against its constitutionality.—The Court delivered an opinion, on very strong grounds that Congress did not act within its specially delegated powers when it issued paper money and required its acceptance as a lawful tender between citizens.—Ibid. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], February 23, 1866, p. 4, c. 1

Extract from Charge to the Grand Jury of
Smith County, by Judge L. W. Cooper.

            The Democrat, of Crockett, published the charge entire.  We copy the following paragraphs:
           
A class of persons known to us as slaves, from the earliest period of our lives up to the present date, are no longer slaves; no longer property; but by the powers that be, have been declared free, with certain rights and privileges.  I therefore charge you that the negro is no longer a slave, but free, and that before your body he occupies the same position as a violator of the law, which a white man would; and for the commission of crimes and misdemeanors, you will return bills of indictment against the white man and freedman alike.  I have to charge you that the same acts it would take to constitute an assault and battery upon a white man, would be an assault and battery upon a black man, and so in all other cases.
           
I do not mean by this, that the political freedom of the black man necessarily draws with it, all the rights and privileges of a citizen, such as the right of suffrage, to take a seat by you in the jury box, holding offices, &c., for I am far from believing that the great God of nature, in his wisdom, created the black man the equal of the white man, either intellectually or socially, and that which God failed to do, man cannot do by legislation.  Certain rights, however, do attach to his freedom; the right to the protection of his life and his person from abuse and assaults; the right to be protected in the enjoyment of his property and the fruits of his labor.  For this reason you can receive his testimony before you as that of a white man, and give it such credit only as you believe it deserves.  Short of this, his liberty would be a curse to him instead of a boon.  His life, his person, his liberty and his property would be always in jeopardy, and that without remedy.
           
It is said the war has left us humiliated and degraded.  I do not believe a word of it.  A noble, patriotic, and chivalrous people humiliated, simply because they made a fight upon principle, as they honestly believed, and hundreds and thousands of patriots fell martyrs to the cause!  'Tis true, defeat came in consequence of superior force and advantages on the one side, and I might add, corruption in high places on the other.  Then let us harbor not the idea for a solitary moment, that we are either humiliated or degraded.  No, we are a great people, and have a great country, and protected by the laws of a good government; if we are but true to ourselves, our government will be perpetuated in its republican form for ages to come; a beacon light to other countries and a terror to tyrants and despots.
           
It is said that during the four years of war we were without law, in a perfect state of anarchy, every man turned loose to plunder, steal, and rob with impunity, and go hence without delay.  But I charge you that we had law, we had courts and officers, but in a great measure they were made powerless by the orders and edicts of military Directors and Despots, and the constitution of your country trampled under foot and wholly disregarded, when it declares, "the Military shall be subordinate to the civil, private property shall not be taken for public use without adequate compensation," and in numerous other instances not now necessary to mention.
           
This state of affairs, however, did not justify men in violating the penal law of the land.  I therefore charge you if any one in your country had committed the crime of theft or robbery, under the familiar (if not popular) name of "jayhawking," you will return a bill of indictment against him.  He is a violator of the law, the same laws being in existence during the rebellion that existed prior to it. 

DALLAS HERALD, February 24, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
We are gratified to chronicle the fact that the young gentlemen and ladies of Tyler have perfected the organization of an association known as the "Shelly [sic] Institute," for reading and other literary exercises.  This is a move in the right direction, and we hope that the interest now manifested will be continued.  We understand that it is not strictly exclusive, but that all whose tastes lead them in that direction will be welcomed.  To add to the interest of the institution, and to give permanency and character thereto, it is the purpose of the Institute to favor the community with public lectures during the season, by the professional gentlemen of the place and elsewhere.  The first lecture will be delivered (simply as an introductory) on Wednesday evening, 7th February, at the Baptist Church, by Col. M. A. Long, to which the public are invited.—Tyler Reporter.
           
The Tyler Reporter understands that Assessors and Collectors of Taxes, in some of the counties, refuse to respond to the Governor's proclomation [sic] of the 10th of October, in which he requires them to make returns to the Comptroller's office "of all monies or securities, or currency of whatever nature, which they may have received in payment of taxes prior to 1st of July 1865." 

DALLAS HERALD, February 24, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
A company of United States troops in accordance with an order from Genl. Custar [sic], arrested our townsman, Col. G. W. Chilton, with instructions to take him to Austin.  At the time of his arrest he was engaged in attending to his duties as an attorney in the District Court in this place.  He is not informed of the charges against him, but suppose it is something that transpired while he was in the Confederate service.  We regret this occurrence, and hope he may have a speedy trial, and establish his innocence should there be any charges alleged against him.  We know nothing of Col. Chilton's conduct while in the service, while at home he never in any way countenanced or committed outrages.—Since the termination of the war, he has quietly and attentively pursued his profession, having an excellent practice, and in every respect acting the part of a good and worthy citizen.—Tyler Journal 23d inst. 

DALLAS HERALD, February 24, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Austin correspondent of the Galveston News under date of the 10th inst., says:
           
Col. G.  W.  Chilton, of Tyler, Smith county, arrived here last evening under arrest by order of Gen. Brown, under instructions of Maj. Gen. Custar [sic], (mustered out now,) and (Maj. Gen. C. having left the city,) reported to Brig. Gen. Thompson, who declined to take action in the case, remarking that he knew nothing of the cause of the arrest, none having been reported to him, and adding that he did not believe in military arrests, at this time anyhow.  Col. Chilton was then taken before Maj. Starr, Provost Marshal General (of the regular army) who stated that he knew nothing of the circumstances connected with the arrest, or of any facts bearing upon the case, and that he would take no action in the matter.  He then stated to Capt. McCormick (the officer in charge of Col. C) that he had complied with his orders, and that he saw nothing further for him to do than to release Col. Chilton from arrest, which was accordingly done. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], March 2, 1866, p. 4, c. 1
           
The following is an extract from the presentment of the Grand Jury of Smith county:
           
"Crime, with that class of inhabitants which has so recently been withdrawn from the providing and protecting care of humane masters, and thrown, all unprepared for the struggle, upon their own resources, is not as prevalent as it was feared it would be.  While it is true that some of the freedmen have inaugurated their freedom by vicious and unlawful indulgences, the great mass of them have gone to work under contracts with white men, with a cheerful zeal, which promises much good in the future.  We believe that by evoking to our aid wise legislation, and by the exercise of patient forbearance toward the negro, he may be made to contribute much to the wealth and prosperity of our country; at least, the importance of the experiment demands at our hands a fair trial." 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], March 3, 1866, p. 2, c. 3

Valedictory.

            In "the course of human events, it has become necessary for" me "to dissolve" my connection with the Harrison Flag, and a decent respect for the opinions of its patrons and the public, as well as the exactness of a time-honored custom, require that I should declare the causes which have impelled me to the action.  While the business and social intercourse of Mr. Barrett and myself have been of the most friendly character, our notions of political matters have not harmonized as well.  In addition to this, I had received the appointment of Chief Justice of Harrison county, and, in the faithful discharge of the duties of this office, more of my time was demanded than was strictly compatible with my duties as editor.  Mr. Barrett will assume entire control of the paper, both as editor and publisher, and I feel confident that he has the energy and ability to make the Flag an interesting and welcome visitor to all who may favor it with their patronage.  In retiring I can but feel the liveliest interest in his success, and hope that a generous public will extend that encouragement that is so necessary to one of his age, with the weighty responsibilities that must rest upon him in his undertaking.  My long and intimate acquaintance with Capt. J. W. Barrett, has enkindled more than an ordinary desire for the present and future prosperity of his son.
           
To the patrons of the Flag, I would return my most grateful acknowledgement for the very liberal manner in which it has been encouraged, at a time when such manifestations were most needed and I trust most appreciated, with such a reception and an ample supply of paper and other materials for twelve months, the prospects for the future are very encouraging.  In parting from you under these circumstances it is but natural that I should feel many regrets.
           
In taking leave of the chair editorial, I am not unmindful of the kindness and many courtesies that have been extended to me by the Fraternity, and to all I can say, that you have, gentlemen, my best wishes for your prosperity and success in the laudable enterprise in which you are so industriously engaged.  A bright future awaits us as a people, and to no class will the country be more indebted for so desirable a condition than to the press.  May the conductors of the press properly appreciate their position, and weigh well the consequences that are likely to follow any failure to discharge their whole duty.
                                               
                                    S. D. Wood
Marshall, March 8th, 1866. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], March 3, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
[Summary:  Wood was editor for past four months.  Reply by Barrett very courteous, promising to do his best.] 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], March 9, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
Mail Direct to Tyler.—A direct mail has been started to Tyler, and will be continued if a sufficient amount is made to justify the expense.  It will be carried for the present, once a week.  This mail will prove a great convenience, and we trust the enterprising proprietor will experience no difficulty in making it pay. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], March 23, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
           
Messrs. Ed. W. Smith and W. F. Hamilton have bought out the Tyler Journal, and removed the office to Palestine, where they will soon issue a paper with the title of the "Trinity News." 

DALLAS HERALD, March 31, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
We see that a new paper is being started at Palestine, upon the office of the "Tyler Journal," which has been removed from Tyler to that place.  We wish the proprietors much success. 

DALLAS HERALD, March 31, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter comes to us now regularly but by a very circuitous route, and is rather old when we receive it, yet it is so neat and well gotten up we always read it.  The number before us contains the addition of a Religious Department which is controlled by N. P. Moore, a man of ability, and wields a ready and graceful pen. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], May 31, 1866, p. 1, c. 6
[Summary:  Dead at Camp Douglas—7th Texas Regiment at Ft. Donelson; 17th Texas at Arkansas Post] 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], May 31, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter of the 16th gives an account of a melancholy accident on the 9th, near Tyler, which resulted in the death of a young lady and a negro boy, as follows:
           
For a week or two past, Misses Mora and Sue McKellar have been spending time with their relatives and friends in our town, until Wednesday last, when their father, John A. McKellar, sent a buggy and driver for them.  In obedience to his desire, they started home, attended only by the driver, a negro boy some fifteen or sixteen years of age.  They intended to cross the Neches river which was very much swollen by the recent heavy rains, at Saunders' Mill.  Reaching a slough on this side, and near the river, both young ladies expressed doubt as to the safety of attempting to cross; but finally, encouraged by the driver, who had crossed there but a day or two before, and who described the water as only knee deep, they overcame their fears and ventured in.  They had driven but a little distance when they went suddenly into the water some twelve feet deep.  In an instant all were beneath the flood.  Miss Sue, the survivor, says that her first impulse was to prevent the water from getting into her face, and strangling her, which she did by wrapping her face in her dress, with the hope that by holding on to the buggy they might soon reach shallow water again.  In this she was disappointed, as the buggy caught against something and stopped the mules.  She then rose on the back seat of the buggy, and leaped upward, more perhaps from natural impulse than from any definate [sic] idea of benefiting herself.  Lighting back into the water again, her feet touched the buggy and she again sprang upward, this time most fortunately, catching a small twig growing above the water.  By this time she drew herself up so as to keep her head above water, and was for the time comparatively safe.  She now had an opportunity of viewing the terrible scene before and beneath her.  Her sister was floating and rapidly drowning almost within reach of her.  She implored [her] to come to her, but was only answered by a look of despair as the dying form rose for the last time above the water.  The mules and buggy were just below.  With her feet she tried in vain to loose the traces, with the hope that the mules would swim out and be an alarm to some one near.  The driver was heard drowning near the buggy. She screamed at the top of her voice for help.  At length, after they had been in the water for an hour, help came.  Two gentlemen reached the distressing scene.  Miss Sue was still clinging to the little limb which had saved her.  These noble hearted men, putting forth every energy, and risking their own lives, soon rescued both young ladies from the river.  Poor Miss Mora was dead!  Every possible exertion was made to revive her, but in vain—the beautiful spirit had fled. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], April 6, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
We had the pleasure of greeting Col. Douglass, one of the editors and proprietors of that excellent sheet, the Tyler Reporter.  He was on his way to New Orleans. . . .
           
The Tyler Reporter advocates a division of the State.  Our contemporary urges a number of reasons in favor of division.  There are many, as we think, possessing more weight against the policy of division, which, in due season, we shall present. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], April 6, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
The Tyler Reporter states that a plan is maturing for the establishment of a stage line between Tyler and Marshall.  We are much gratified at this information.  Such a line is much needed. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], April 21, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
We would earnestly impress upon the citizens of Smith county, the importance of bending their united energies in pushing forward the completion of the railroad to their county.  This will place Tyler and Shreveport within five or six hours of each other.  Many of the people of that county own stock in this company, and all of its men of means, ought to imitate their laudable example.  Interest alone should stimulate an enterprising spirit, for when finished to that point, land will be worth five times what it is at present.  Railroads are destined to pay better in Texas than any other State in the south, for the reason that there are no navigable streams worthy of the name within its territory, and consequently transportation and travel will be greater than elsewhere.  It is believed that this road when finished to this place and Tyler will pay at least twenty per cent on the stock.  We learn that Col. Waskom, the President of the company, will visit Tyler soon, and test the enterprise and zeal of the people of that section. 

DALLAS HERALD, May 19, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
Judge S. P. Donley, of Smith County, one of the candidates on the conservative Ticket for the Supreme court, at the time of his nomination had placed himself before the people of his District as a candidate for District Judge, but immediately on receiving notice of his name being recommended to the people for the Supreme Bench, he declined the canvass of the District, and accepted the nomination tendered him.  Thus, all the distinguished gentlemen who were recommended at Austin have signified their acceptance and it was our only desire to learn this positively that we deferred placing the ticket at our masthead at an earlier date, than we did.
           
Judge Donley is well known in Eastern Texas, where his eminent abilities and industry have won for him the confidence and esteem of the people. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], May 31, 1866, p. 2, c. 6

To the Voters of Texas.

            I am a Candidate for the office of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, at the coming election in June.  My name, with those of others, was placed before the public by a large number of the members of the late Convention at Austin, from different parts of the State, without my expectations, knowledge, or consent.  The object as I am informed was to present a ticket upon which the Conservative Union men of the State could concentrate, and thereby facilitate the defeat of the Radical faction, who had already presented their ticket for State officers.  This must have been done on account of the shortness of the time preceding the election, and consequent difficulty of securing concert of action in any other way.  Being a private citizen, never having been a politician, and having had no participation, directly or indirectly in the matter, I deemed this an important expression, uninfluenced by partiality or a mere desire for the individual advancement of myself or any one else.  Under such circumstances, I did not think it proper to decline, and have consented that my name should remain upon the "Conservative Union Ticket."  For my qualification and fitness for the high and responsible office, I can but refer to those who have known me for the last nineteen years in Texas.  My pursuits have been professional, except as absence of between one and two years in the Confederate States army, and of confinement in a Northern prison during the late war.
           
The public confidence and liberal patronage over an extensive and populous district in Eastern Texas, as well as the very large support given me for District Attorney of the 6th District, (the only position I have ever sought or held,) encourage me to surmount the diffidence which I would otherwise have in suffering my name to be associated with so eminent a public station.  I solicit enquiry as to my character as a man, a lawyer, and citizen, on the part of those to whom I am unknown, and shall content myself with the verdict of the people on the subject.  And should I be elected, my course of conduct in the past is the best index of the manner in which I will discharge my duty in the future.
                                               
                                    Respectfully and truly,
                                               
                                                Your fellow citizen,
                                               
                                                            S. P. Donley.
                                               
                        Tyler, Smith Co, Texas, May 19, '66 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 2, 1866, p. 3, c. 1
                                               
                                    Quitman, Texas, May 28, 1866.
R. W. Loughery, Esq.:
           
Dear Sir—In the Houston Telegraph of the 11th inst., there is an article under the title, "The Supreme Court Judgeship," that, in my opinion, is calculated to injure me in the election.
           
The Telegraph is not now before me; I speak from the recollection.  After mentioning in complementary terms Judges Moore and Coke, it is said Major A. H. Willie represents the East and Red River country; for this section we should have recommended Mr. Donley, whose name was suggested by the Austin Convention men, as we hold on to every one of them we can, where it not that the East evidently prefer Major Willie, having called him out.  The calling out alluded to, I presume, refers to a letter of the 3rd of April, addressed to Major Willie by Sm. Steadman, Esq., and other members of the bar in attendance upon the District Court of Harrison county.  If I remember aright there are twenty-two signatures to the letter, and so far as I know and remember, representing Harrison and three adjoining counties.  I have been informed that no meeting of the members of the bar or other public meeting was held at the time the letter was addressed.  Then the letter was prepared and circulated for signatures.
           
Among the signers I recognize the names of gentlemen that I have known for many years, and regard them as good friends, including in the number a brother-in-law, with whom I have ever been upon terms of friendship, and do not think it should be inferred from this letter that the signers intended that it should be used as manifesting a preference of the East for Major Willie over all others.  I suppose those gentlemen had no authority, and did not assume to speak for the East, and the Telegraph is mistaken in drawing that conclusion.  If there was other evidence of the preference of the East for Major Willie, it has not to my knowledge been stated.
           
I did not seek this position.  My name was suggested by a portion of the Conservative members of the Convention, without my solicitation, knowledge, or consent.  The object, as I have been informed, was to present a ticket that the Conservative men of the State could unite upon, and defeat the radicals, who had at that time a full list of candidates for State officers in the field.  With this understanding, I accepted the position tendered me.
           
If I knew, or had information upon which reasonably to believe, that the State or the East preferred Major Willie, and by continuing a candidate I might endanger the success of the Conservative party, I would decline at once; but I do not know, nor have I evidence upon which I think it can be reasonably inferred, that the East of State prefer Major Willie to myself.
           
I came to Texas in 1846, stopped at Clarksville, remained there a few months, moved to Cherokee in 1847, where I remained til 1860, when I again moved to Tyler, in Smith county, where I now reside.  In this time I have sought office on two occasions only; first, in 1852, I was a candidate for District Attorney in the Sixth Judicial District, and elected by a small plurality vote.  There were five candidates.  In 1854 I was a candidate for re-election in the same district; there were about eight thousand votes polled in the District.  Again, I had four opponents, all clever gentlemen and good lawyers, all of whom have held respectable official position in the State—I was elected, receiving nearly one-half of all the votes, and leading my opponent, who was next to me, upwards of twenty-three hundred votes.  Since then I have not sought office, and have in no way tested my popularity, except in pursuing by vocation as a lawyer.  I have received a liberal share of the business transacted in the counties where I have resided and have visited.  Between Major Willie and myself there has been no trial of strength or popularity in any what whatever, and I think the Editor of the Telegraph is mistaken in saying that "the East evidently prefers Major Willie."
           
Believing that the article in the Telegraph does me injustice, I desire to make this statement to the public through the columns of your paper.
                                               
                        Very truly yours,
                                               
                                    S. P. Donley. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 2, 1866, p. 2, c. 2

To the Voters of Texas.

            I am a Candidate for the office of Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, at the coming election in June.  My name, with those of others, was placed before the public by a large number of the members of the late Convention at Austin, from different parts of the State, without my expectations, knowledge, or consent.  The object as I am informed was to present a ticket upon which the Conservative Union men of the State could concentrate, and thereby facilitate the defeat of the Radical faction, who had already presented their ticket for State officers.  This must have been done on account of the shortness of the time preceding the election, and consequent difficulty of securing concert of action in any other way.  Being a private citizen, never having been a politician, and having had no participation, directly or indirectly in the matter, I deemed this an important expression, uninfluenced by partiality or a mere desire for the individual advancement of myself or any one else.  Under such circumstances, I did not think it proper to decline, and have consented that my name should remain upon the "Conservative Union Ticket."  For my qualification and fitness for the high and responsible office, I can but refer to those who have known me for the last nineteen years in Texas.  My pursuits have been professional, except as absence of between one and two years in the Confederate States army, and of confinement in a Northern prison during the late war.
           
The public confidence and liberal patronage over an extensive and populous district in Eastern Texas, as well as the very large support given me for District Attorney of the 6th District, (the only position I have ever sought or held,) encourage me to surmount the diffidence which I would otherwise have in suffering my name to be associated with so eminent a public station.  I solicit enquiry as to my character as a man, a lawyer, and citizen, on the part of those to whom I am unknown, and shall content myself with the verdict of the people on the subject.  And should I be elected, my course of conduct in the past is the best index of the manner in which I will discharge my duty in the future. 
                                               
                                    Respectfully and truly,
                                               
                                    Your fellow citizen,
                                               
                                                S. P. Donley.
                                               
                        Tyler, Smith Co., Texas, May 19, '66. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], July 7, 1866, p. 2, c. 6
           
Smith County—There remains two hundred votes to count at Tyler, and Jamestown and Starville [sic] to hear from:
           
For Governor—Throckmorton, 883; Pease 57; For Lt. Governor—Jones, 777, and Lindsey, 40; For Attorney General—Banton, 442; Walton, 252, Binkley, 52.  For Comptroller—Robards, 732, Shaw 50; For State Treasurer—Royston, 482, Durham, 187.  For Commissioner General Land Office—Crosby, 692, War, 33.  For Supreme Court—Moore, 632, Coke, 684, Donley 750, Cleveland, 649, Willie, 604, Smith 2; Bell, 68; Jones 41; Caldwell, 41; Johnson, 44; Ochiltree, 15.  The following county officers are thought to be elected:  B. T. Selman, Senator; Legislature, R. K. Gaston, and Jonathan Lewter; Chief Justice, Sam'l D. Gibbs; County Clerk, E. A. Godley; District Clerk, Geo. Miller Johnson; Sheriff, Bryant Marsh.  The vote for or against the Amendments stood—525 for, and 227 against. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], July 12, 1866, p. 2, c. 2

Official Report

            We find the following in Flake's Bulletin of the 27th of June:
                                               
                                    Bureau of R.F. & A.L.            }
                                               
                        Marshall, Texas, June 6, 1866.            }
Col. W. H. Sinclair, Asst, Adj. Gen. Bureau R.F. & A.L.
            Colonel:  I have the honor to state that since the removal of the cavalry from this point the people without the immediate reach of this office, have taken advantage of the comparatively unprotected condition of freed people to continue to an aggravated degree the old system of slavery.  Scarcely a day passes but that freedmen demonstrate by exhibiting their wounds the fact that in this section, where the present power of the Bureau cannot reach, they are held in even a worse condition than before.  And to my certain knowledge in Panola, Rusk, Cherokee, Smith, Upshur and Marion counties, slavery, with all its former horrors exists.  The negroes are not free there.  They are not even allowed the privileges they enjoyed before the emancipation.  There are sections of this (Harrison) county, also, where freed people are grossly mistreated.  Yet having only infantry here, it is impossible to arrest the offenders, as they are invariably warned by people on the road, or even in town here, before they can be reached.  I feel it my solemn duty to make this representation, and to respectfully suggest that if a force of twenty-five cavalry could be sent here, could and would penetrate into these hard sections, and bring the offenders to justice and punishment.  There is a company of sixty of the 80th U.S. C. I., here, but they do not succeed in arresting offenders, even near here, and it is foolishness to dispatch them twenty-five or thirty miles with any hope of success.
           
I would beg leave to respectfully state that there are proven cases of gross brutality and outrage on file in this office.
           
Hoping that this subject may receive the attention of the assistant commissioner,
           
I am Colonel, very respectfully,
                                               
                                    Your obedient servant,
                                               
                                                Q. W. Beebee,
                                               
                        1st Lieut. & R. C. Sub-Asst. Com. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], July 21, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
Red Jacket Bitters Laid in the Shade.—Advertisers, these days, seem to study the most ingenious mode of getting up their advertisements to attract notice.  One of the most remarkable we have noticed is in the Tyler Reporter, by Messrs. Fleishl, Smith and Goodman, merchants.  The large displayed lines, taken by themselves, read as follows:  "A good Husband guaranteed to every Young Lady in Smith or Van Zandt, and Eastern Texas." 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], July 26, 1866, p. 1, c. 5
[Summary:  Minutes of a Railroad Convention at the Methodist church, Rusk, Cherokee County, on July 10, 1866.  Smith County delegates were M. A. Long and J. M. Douglass.] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], July 27, 1866, p. 3, c. 2
           
Post-Offices Reopened and Postmasters Appointed in Texas to March 1, 1866.
           
Tyler, Smith                                        R. P. Derrington 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], August 1, 1866, p. 5, c. 4
           
List of Post-Offices Opened in Texas During the Month of June
           
Starrville, Smith                                    Mrs. Sarah Ann Duke 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 3, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
Messrs. Mims & Wood, have established a line of hacks from this place to Tyler, and are now making tri-weekly trips.  They are exerting themselves to have appointments made for the various Post offices along the route.  These gentlemen are also running a tri-weekly horse mail from Marshall to Keachi, La.  These routes have been without mail facilities, and the people who are directly benefited should give every encouragement to these gentlemen in their undertaking. 

DALLAS HERALD, August 4, 1866, p. 2, c. 6
           
From the Tyler Reporter.
           
A Railroad Convention at Tyler.
           
Elsewhere in this paper will be found a call, signed by several persons, for a railroad convention for Eastern Texas, to meet at Tyler on the 11th day of September.—The original design was to hold a railroad meeting at that time, at which the officers of the Southern Pacific road have appointed to be present, with a view to devising means to forward that road.  While the original design will be pursued in the main, it is thought best to call upon all the counties of Eastern Texas to send delegates to a convention to be held at that time.—Tyler being a central point, and nearly all the various railroads now chartered centering at this place, it will be an opportune time and place to hold a general convention.  The following roads will be particularly interested in this convention:  The Southern Pacific, which, it is hoped, will be built to Tyler in two years, and which will pass on west in the direction of Waco; the East Texas road, which is chartered from Sabine Pass by way of Nacogdoches and Henderson to Tyler, which road is intended to penetrate the great wheat country, in the direction of Dallas, by way of Kaufman; the Houston, Trinity and Tyler road, which has very favorable franchises, and is allowd [sic] by an act of the Legislature of 1863, two years after the termination of the war to complete the first 25 miles, and the extension of this road to Clarksville, to connect with the road from Memphis which is being built to Clarksville.  These various enterprises are all practicable and should begin now to attract the careful attention of the people whose interests are to be subserved by their progress.  A general attendance will be solicited by the movers of the proposed convention.  Everything will be done on the part of our citizens to make the occasion an interesting one.
                                               
                                    Tyler, July 12th, 1866.
To the citizens of Northern, North-Eastern and Southern Texas, interested in Railroad enterprises in Eastern Texas:
           
Fellow-Citizens—The necessity of Railroad enterprises in your portions of the state has long been felt.  Among the many charters granted by the State Legislature, prior to our difficulties with the Northern section of our Republic, but few have accomplished the ends for which they were created.  Some have, since the cessation of hostilities, gone to work under their old charters, with the hope and probabilities of success; other companies, we are informed, intend doing so, while new enterprises are being agitated.  We must not slumber on our privileges.  We must take such steps as will insure the success of such roads as will supply our most urgent necessities at as early a day as practicable.  Our crops are usually abundant, and need the aid of Railroads to help us to a market.  The bowels, nay, we might say, the crust of our hills and valleys contain unknown fortunes of mineral wealth.  All these interests must be developed, and when developed, will make up one of the greatest and most powerful empires, political as well as pecuniary, as the same extent of country in the world.
           
We can attain this condition if we will.  Unless the people act, this glorious result will be accomplished by foreign capital and our public enterprises and the benefits resulting therefrom, will flow into their pockets.
           
In view of all, we call on you to take steps by public meetings, and send delegates with proper vouchers to meet at Tyler, on Tuesday, the 11th day of September next, and by free and uninterrupted exchange of ideas, such enterprises as are most needed and will do "the greatest good to the greatest number," may be given such an impetus as will secure their early completion.
                                               
                                    Very Respectfully, &c.
Elim F. Swann,                                                 Geo. Yarbrough
Jno. C. Robertson,                                           S. H. Boren
J. M. Douglas,                                                  Willis Roberts
Sam'l L. Earle,                                                  M.  A. Long
W.  W. Grinnan,                                               T. B. Erwin
R. B. Hubbard                                                  Bryant Marsh 

DALLAS HERALD, August 4, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
We publish in another part of today's paper a call by some citizens of Smith County, for a Railroad Convention to be held at Tyler on the 11th day of September next.  We deem it of the utmost importance to us as a community that Dallas County should be represented in that Convention, and to this end, we hope to see the people move in this matter, a public meeting should be called, and delegates appointed. 

DALLAS HERALD, August 4, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
[Summary:  Tyler Reporter urges Legislature to no longer indulge delinquent railroad companies, but to use their best judgment] 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 9, 1866, p. 2, c. 5

Railroad Convention.
--------

                                                                                    Tyler, July 12, 1866.
To the citizens of Northern and North-eastern, and Southern Texas, interested in Railroad enterprises in Eastern Texas
           
Fellow Citizens—The necessity of Railroad enterprises in your portions of the State has long been felt.  Among the many charters granted by the State Legislatures, prior to our difficulties with the Northern section of our Republic, but few have accomplished the ends for which they were created.  Some have since the cessation of hostilities, gone to work under their old charters with the hope and probabilities of success; other companies, we are informed, intend doing so, while new enterprises are being agitated.  We must not slumber on our privileges.  We must take steps as will insure the success of such roads as will supply our most urgent necessities at as early a day as practicable.  Our crops are usually abundant and need the aid of Railroads to help us to a market.  The bowels, nay, we might say the crust of our hills and valleys, contain unknown fortunes of mineral wealth.  All these interests must be developed, and when developed will make us one of the greatest and most powerful empires, political as well as pecuniary, as the same extent of country in the world.
           
We can attain this condition if we will.  Unless the people act, this glorious result will be accomplished by foreign capital, and our public enterprises and the benefits resulting therefrom will flow into their pockets.
           
In view of these facts, and others patent to the minds of all, we call on you to take steps by public meetings, and send delegates with proper vouchers to meet at Tyler on Thursday, the 11th day of September next, and by free and uninterrupted exchanges of ideas, such enterprises as are most needed, and will do "the greatest good to the greatest number," may be given such an impetus as will secure their early completion.
                                               
                                    Very Respectfully, &c.
Elim F. Swann,                                                 Geo. Yarbrough,
Jno. C. Roberston, [sic]                                    S. H. Boren,
J. M. Douglas,                                                  Willis Roberts,
Sam'l. Earle,                                                     M. A. Long,
W. W. Grinnan,                                                T. B. Erwin,
R. B. Hubbard,                                                 Bryant Marsh,
                       
            and others. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 11, 1866, p. 2, c. 6

Railroad Convention.
--------

                                                                                    Tyler, July 12, 1866.
To the citizens of Northern and North-Eastern, and Southern Texas, interested in Railroad enterprises in Eastern Texas
           
Fellow Citizens—The necessity of Railroad enterprises in your portions of the State has long been felt.  Among the many charters granted by the State Legislature, prior to our difficulties with the Northern section of our Republican, but few have accomplished the ends for which they were created.  Some have since the cessation of hostilities, gone to work under their old charters with the hope and probabilities of success; other companies, we are informed, intend doing so, while new enterprises are being agitated.  We must not slumber on our privileges.  We must take steps as will inspire the success of such roads as will supply our most urgent necessities at as early a day as practicable.  Our crops are usually abundant and need the aid of Railroads to help us to a market.  The bowels, nay, we might say the crust of our hills and valleys, contain unknown fortunes of mineral wealth.  All these interests must be developed, and when developed will make us one of the greatest and most powerful empires, political as well as pecuniary, as the same extent of country in the world.
           
We can attain this condition if we will.  Unless the people act, this glorious result will be accomplished by foreign capital, an our public enterprises and the benefits resulting therefrom will flow into their pockets.
           
In view of these facts, and others patent to the minds of all, we call on you to take steps by public meetings, and send delegates with proper vouchers to meet at Tyler on Thursday, the 11th day of September next, and by free and uninterrupted exchanges of ideas, such enterprises as are most needed, and will do "the greatest good to the greatest number," may be given such an impetus as will secure their early completion.
                                               
                                    Yours Respectfully, &c.
Elim F. Swann,                                                 Geo. Yarbrough,
Jno. C. Roberston [sic]                                     S. H. Boren,
J. M. Douglas,                                                  Willis Roberts,
Sam'l L. Earle,                                                  M. A. Long,
W. W. Grinnan,                                                T. B. Erwin,
R. B. Hubbard,                                                 Bryant Marsh,
                       
            And others. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], August 14, 1866, p. 5, c. 2
[Summary:  Article from Henderson Times on drilling for oil in Nacogdoches and Angelina Counties—at eleven feet hit small vein] 

DALLAS HERALD, August 18, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
We acknowledge the reception of an invitation to attend a Railroad Barbecue to be given by the citizens of Smith County, at Tyler, on the 13th of September.  We shall be pleased to attend, if it is in our power to do so.  We have heretofore called the attention of the people to the importance of  Dallas County being represented in the Convent6ion which will be held on the 11th September, at Tyler, and hope that our people will need no further urging to do so.  Our county is particularly interested in the matters that will be discussed, and should so far forget her own interest as to neglect to let her self be heard, we fear she will suffer by it.  Who will call a meeting? 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 25, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Tyler Index recommends Gen. A. B. Norton for United States Senator.  There are older Texans, more able men, and politicians who, in our opinion at least, would more faithfully represent the State than General Norton. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], August 28, 1866, p. 5, c. 2
           
The grape crop of this section is turning out very well.  Considerable quantities have been sold in our market.  Mr. Woldert informed us several days ago that he had made over 33 gallons of wine.—Tyler Reporter, Aug. 22.  

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 30, 1866, p. 1, c. 6
           
The grape crop of this section is turning out very well.  Considerable quantities have been sold in our market.  Mr. Woldert informed us that he had made over 300 gallons of wine.—Tyler Reporter. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], September 6, 1866, p. 2, c. 6
[Summary:  Biography of Oran Roberts, new senator from Texas.] 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 8, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Tyler Journal of the 29th ult., says that throughout the Eastern portion of Smith county there will not be more than half a cotton crop made.  In the Western part of the county, and in Van Zandt, the crop is more promising. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 8, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
The Railroad Convention, it will be remembered, meets at Tyler on the 11th inst.  The Index says "every preparation has been made for the meeting, and we trust that the result of its deliberations may be commensurate with the importance of the subject.
           
Jail Delivery.—The Tyler Reporter of the 5th, says, "on Friday night last, about eight o'clock, the six negroes confined in our jail, desiring we suppose, a little moon-light promenade and fresh air, stepped out, nolens volens, over the jailor, and have, up to this time, neglected to return. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 8, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The publisher of the Tyler Index has discovered a potato "in his own patch," which measures between nine and ten inches in circumference, which will weight not less than two pounds. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
[Summary:  Railroad meeting at Shreveport on the 6th to appoint delegates to convention in Tyler] 

DALLAS HERALD, September 22, 1866, p. 1, c. 2
           
The Tyler Journal of the 29th ult., says that throughout the Eastern portion of Smith county there will not be more than a half a cotton crop made.  In the western part of the county, and in Van Zandt, the crop is more promising. 

DALLAS HERALD, September 22, 1866, p. 1, c. 3
[Summary:  Kaufman railroad meeting on September 4, 1866, resolutions made to send delegates to Tyler meeting.] 

DALLAS HERALD, September 22, 1866, p. 2, c. 2

The Tyler Rail Road Convention

            Col. Geo. Wilson and Jas. Bently, Esq., delegates from this county to the Tyler Rail Road Convention returned home on Monday last.  We are obliged to them for the outlines of the action of that body which we give below.
           
The Convention organized on the 11th by the election of Col. J. M. Waskom, of Harrison County, President, Col. Robertson, of Tyler, and Forshay of Galveston, Vice Presidents, and Jas. P. Douglass, of Tyler and Mr. Gray, of Wood County, Secretaries.
           
Delegates were in attendance from Galveston, Harrison, Navarro, Dallas, Smith, Anderson, Wood Counties, Texas, and from Shreveport, La.
           
On the first day nothing was done except to organize and appoint the Committees.
           
On the second day resolutions were passed asking the Legislature to grant all aid practicable to the Southern Pacific, the Houston and Texas Central, and to a road running North from Galveston, by Tyler to Red River, these three lines being deemed the main truck routes in which Eastern and Northeastern Texas is interested.  This, we believe, is about the leading item of the action of the Convention.  Speeches were made by Col. Waskom (who is President of the Southern Pacific Road), Col. Forshay and others, and a general interchange of opinions was had among the delegates as to the wants of this section of the State, &c.
           
Col. Waskom, in his speech, and in private conversations, paying well, was out of debt, on a permanent and healthy basis, and that it was the intention of the Company, to push the road on to Dallas and the West, as rapidly as possible.  He assured the people of Tyler, that if they would take stock to the amount of the difference between the freight on their present crop of cotton to a market, and $1.50 per bale, he would guarantee to take their next years crop to Shreveport, from Tyler, at that price.  He did not anticipate any trouble in raising means to push the road rapidly ahead.  With what aid the State gives them and the value of the lands they obtain as fast as each section is completed, they can build the road, provided the counties through which the road goes subscribes stock sufficient to grade it.  Our delegates inform us that Dallas is determined on by the Company, as one point to be made under any circumstances.
           
The Barbecue on the 13th was well attended and passed off to the satisfaction of everyone.  Speeches were made, good fare was enjoyed and everyone returned well pleased with the affair.
           
We presume we shall next week have the full proceedings, which we shall publish. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 22, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
The Railroad Convention at Tyler, says the Index, adjourned on the 14th, after having accomplished, with great unanimity, the object for which they assembled—recommending to the Legislature "the adoption of the corporate system the State has availed itself of in the construction of railroads," and also recommending "two great main routes, one along parallel thirty-two, the continuation of the present line of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and the other extending due Northward from Galveston Bay, cross Red River at or near the mouth of the Kiomatia.  It was urged upon the Legislature to confer upon these two lines, all the assistance provided for by the recently amended constitution of the State. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 22, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Tyler Reporter says they have a squad of U.  S. Soldiers there.  An Arkansian coming into town and perceiving them, "and not knowing that the war had closed," pulled out a six-shooter and fired at one of them, and then made off.  No damage done.
           
We take great pleasure in stating that R. Knight & Co. have a supply of No. 1 flour on hand, from the mills of Maj. J. P. Douglas of Tyler, Texas.  We speak understandingly on the subject, as we have "tasted the bread," and know that the article is genuine.  If you want flour, go to R. Knight & co., and call for the "Douglass brand." 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], September 29, 1866, p. 5, c. 3
           
As the Marshall, Jefferson, Tyler and Ruck [sic] papers do not find fault with either weather or crops, we are left to suppose that they are not as bad as they might have been.—From the New Orleans Picayune, September 26.  

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], September 29, 1866, p. 2, c. 3

                                                                                    For the Flag.

The Railroad Convention.
--------

                                                                                    Tyler, Texas, Sept. 14th, 1866
Mr. Editor:

           
Having been present during the deliberations of the Rail Road Convention, held at this place, commencing on the 11th inst., it may be of interest to the readers of the "Flag" to state a few items respecting it.  Owing to the unfavorable weather for a few days previous to its convening there were not as many delegates present as would have been; not withstanding all the adjacent counties, together with Shreveport, Houston, and Galveston, were represented in the convention.  We were much pleased with the spirit with which the delegates entered upon their duties, and which characterized all the proceedings.  Col. Waskom was elected President of the Convention, and in his vocal energetic manner, conducted the meeting in such a way as to elicit the approbation of all present.  Many and various plans, systems, routes and suggestions, were proposed, which called forth the opinions and views of the delegates, and we believe ended satisfactorily to all—having all arrived at the same conclusion, that the Southern Pacific Rail Road should be extended West; that it should commence immediately; that the people of this county ought to subscribe one hundred thousand dollars, and that the most practicable route is through this city; all of which, we feel confident will be accomplished, from the spirit manifested by the delegates and the people present.  Thursday being the "last day of the feast," the citizens "en masse" turned out, and an immense concourse of people convened to attend the meeting, and partake of the Barbecue.  At 11 o'clock the delegates marched in a body from the Methodist Church, in which the Convention was held, to the Courthouse yard, proceeded by the Tyler Brass Band which discoursed lively and animating music.  After a few minutes our Texas chieftain, Gen. J. B. Hood was conducted to a seat upon the stand amidst the audience he made a few appropriate remarks.  Col. Waskom then entertained the audience with an exposition of the affairs at the present time, with which all present seemed to be much satisfied.—The bad management of that road, until recently, has done more to injure the cause of Rail Roads in Eastern Texas, than all other causes combined.  We think, its baneful effects are now fast being eradicated.  Col. Jack Wharton addressed the assembly in his usual interesting and able manner, eliciting much applause.  Col. Forshey from Galveston and others having spoken, Gen. Hood again rose and entertained the people, who, with breathless silence, only broken by the frequent applause—listened to his patriotic remarks.  Not being familiar with rail roads, he left that to others, and gave us a few expressions with regard to our condition, a people who had risked all; advocated loyalty and summission [sic] to the will of the people of our country, and if we could not get our rights, to summit [sic] with silent dignity.  It was truly impressive to witness this crippled hero of a hundred battles, leaning upon his crutches before those whom he had often cheered on to the charge, now counselling them to be quiet and peaceful.
           
The Congregation now retired to the grove, where was prepared a Barbecue which in quality and magnitude, is not often seen.  At a moderate calculation the table could not have measured less than two hundred yards in length.  All seemed well pleased, and in good order returned to their respective homes, with the exception of those who wished to attend the Rail Road Ball.  This was given in the Ferguson Hall, and for good music, good decorum and for a galaxy of beauty is seldom equaled.  It was quite a success.  The Rail Road Convention will be long remembered by the people of Smith County.                                                               M. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 29, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
Liberality of Marshall.—We are informed by Col. J. C. Robertson, that Mr. A. W. Ferguson has subscribed $5,000 stock in the Southern Pacific Railroad, and seeing the challenge of Messrs. G. G. Gregg & Co. to subscribe as much as anybody else, he has enrolled them for a like sum.  All right gentlemen?  Who else will enter the lists?  Tyler Reporter. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], September 30, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
The Tyler Republican of Sept. 19th says:  "We hear from all parts of this county that the caterpillars have completely destroyed all prospects of late cotton." 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], October 11, 1866, p. 2, c. 3

Col. G. W. Chilton,

offers for both the long and short term.  He is a man of vigorous intellect, a finished orator and a well posted politician.  He would make his mark as a member of Congress.  He acted his part throughout the entire time of the Confederate struggle, endearing himself to many army friends whe [sic] will take pleasure in supporting him.
           
Since the war he has been hunted down and persecuted by a parcel of vindictive Texan federal soldiers, but has been able to vindicate himself successfully against their attacks.  We give him our influence as far as not inconsistent with our support of Col. Camp and hoist his name for the short term. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], October 13, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
The effort to charter a direct route from Houston to Marshall, was defeated.  The charter that will be granted, will be for a road to Clarksville, by way of Tyler. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], October 20, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
           
Palestine District [East Texas Conference, M. E. Church, South]
           
Tyler station—Scales. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], October 23, 1866, p. 2, c. 2
           
The Tyler Index of the 13th says of the cotton crop:
           
From all we can learn from our exchanges, it is fair to presume that the eastern portion of the State will be the only section where the yield of cotton will at all justify the expenditure which has been made in capital and labor to produce the great staple.  In Southern Texas, all along the lower Brazos and Colorado, the destruction of the growing crops, first by the worm and then by the floods of rain which fell during the last days of September has been immense.  In some of these counties which have heretofore given the heaviest yield it is estimated that not more than one-fifth of an average crop will be realized.  In our county, and we believe the same can be said of those adjoining us, two-thirds, if not three-fourths of an average crop will probably be gathered.  Smith county has produced 10,000 bales, and we think that the estimate of 5,000 for this season, which the Reporter makes, is a low one.  There is no doubt that, comparatively speaking, we have been particularly fortunate. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], October 25, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
Smith County.—For the 39 Congress.—
                       
G. W. Chilton, 266, A. B. Norton 2
           
For the 40th Congress.—Chilton 236, Camp 25, Rainey 2, Word 5, Burroughs 3, Ochiltree 2, Norton 2.
           
Only the Tyler box heard from.  No other precincts reported. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], November 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 1

Sinning Away the Day of Grace.

            The Tyler Index has a line of comment on Judge Reagan's letter which reminds us of those stories told by certain theologians of men who have sinned away their days of grace—men in whose hearts there is no room for repentance, and of whose evil ways there is no chance of amendment.  The Index says:
           
We agree with Mr. Reagan, if the late seceeded States had adopted all of the suggestions of the 
            President for their restoration, our political condition would be much better than it is—But some 
            were accepted, while others were rejected.  For instance, in accordance with the President's 
            suggestion, we annulled the ordinance of secession, acquiesced in the abolition of slavery, 
            repudiated the war debt, gave the negro the right to inherit and own property—while we refused 
            to allow him the right of elective franchise, subject to the same tests as white men, and have 
            elected members to our national legislature who are disqualified by the laws of Congress.
   
                     All of us were great Johnson men, and were very ardent for strengthening the hands of 
            the President, but only submitted to such of his policy as we thought absolutely necessary for our 
            restoration.  We are too much deluded with the idea that the object of Mr. Johnson was more to 
            build up a party in the Southern States than for us to adopt any particular policy for our 
            restoration.  Of course, we thought of what the President would accede to, Congress and the 
            people of the United States would sanction.
           
Here is a confession of political sins, "grievous and intolerable."  But like most remorse-stricken sinners, Mr. Index goes beyond the truth, and makes himself worse than he is.  Congress never demanded negro suffrage as the price of restoration, and in refusing the black man this boon, the South committed no offence.
   
                         Our opinion is that Congress would have acquiesced in the President's plans of 
            restoration, if the seceded States had adopted all the President's requirements, and have shown 
            by the laws enacted by the respective legislatures of the seceded States, and the conduct of the 
            people, that they, in good faith, accepted the results of the war.  So long as there is any 
            vindictive feeling manifested against the United States government, just so long will we be in our 
            present, or rather in a worse condition.
   
                     The time has passed for the seceded States, by any voluntary act of theirs, to do 
            anything to aid their restoration.  If our legislature were to adopt the proposed constitutional 
            amendments, as well as establish qualified negro suffrage, with all the provisions that Mr. 
            Reagan proposed, it would accomplish nothing, nor advance one step in the way of restoration.
           
Here, again, both Mr. Reagan and the Index make a mistake.  Congress would not admit the Southern States either with qualified or unqualified negro suffrage, if the amendment itself was not adopted, and Congress will admit them with amendment and without negro suffrage, because negro suffrage does not give security for future "good behavior," which is the point aimed at by the North.  The "time has not passed for the seceded States by any voluntary act of theirs to aid in their restoration."  They have not "sinned away the day of grace."  For States, as well as for individuals
                       
            "While the lamp of life holds out to burn
                       
            The vilest sinner may return."
           
But truth compels us to say that the day of grace is rapidly passing away, and that the night cometh in which no Southern State can do the work of restoration.  We commend the following from the above quoted editorial, to the careful study of all:
   
                     The present indications are that the present State governments will be ignored, 
            territorial governments will be established over us, conditions precedent will be prescribed, 
            and after all of the conditions are complied with Congress, and not we the people of the 
            seceded States, will assume the right to judge as to our loyalty to the general government, 
            and upon their determination will depend our restoration as States, and our representation in 
            Congress.  If the President's views does not harmonize with those of Congress at its next session, 
            he will be a mere cipher so far as the restoration of the States are concerned.  He proposed his 
            plan, the legislative department took issue with him and rejected it, passed the proposed 
            constitutional amendments in contradistinction to his policy, at the same time refusing to pledge 
            Congress to recognize the present State Governments, or admit their representatives upon their 
            adoption.  They [illegible] the breach with the Executive as to his policy—went before the people 
            and they have been sustained.  The people of the North have decided that the policy of the 
            Executive [illegible] the restoration of the States is a failure, that the proposed constitutional 
            amendment must be adopted, and doubtless Congress will be sustained in requiring such other 
            terms as they see fit to impose.  The President used his immense influence and the patronage of 
            his office to avoid this decision, and failed.  He will abide by the result. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
Attention is called to the advertisement of the Tyler Reporter and Palestine News.  These are large, neatly printed, and ably edited journals, and well worthy of the intelligent people of the flourishing cities in which they are published. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
Miss Mollie E. Moore's book of poetry is expected to be in the Texas market soon, as it was in the hands of the binders on the 20th ult. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
We learn from the Index that the U. S. District and Circuit Courts met at Tyler on the 5th inst., Judge DuVal presiding.  No business was done, as the court only remained in session three days.  The next regular term will be in April. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 15, 1866, p. 2, c. 7

Tyler Reporter
and
Palestine News

            Paul H. Earle, Agent, is authorized to receive and receipt for subscriptions [fold—and?] advertisements.
           
Mr. Earle will be found at the house of G. G. Gregg & Co.
                                               
                                    W. F. Hamilton & Co.
                                               
                                    Publishers and Proprietors
Nov 15 '66. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], November 17, 1866, p. 2, c. 1
           
The U. S. District Court met at Tyler on the 8th inst., Judge Du Val presiding.  No business was done.  The Court remained in session but three days.  The next regular term will be in April. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], November 17, 1866, p. 2, c. 3
           
Hon. O. M. Roberts, one of the Senators elect to the U. S. Congress from the State of Texas, passed through Marshall yesterday morning on his way to Washington.  We did not have the pleasure of seeing him, but we learn that he was in fine health.  His colleague ex-President Burnett has gone on, taking the water route.
           
We are anxious to peruse Miss Mollie E. Moore's book of poetry, which is expected to soon make its appearance. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 22, 1866, p. 2, c. 5
Consignment of Merchandise for the week ending Nov. 21st, 1866:
           
G. G. Gregg & co.—Holt & Bro., Tyler, 26 [packages]; Yarbrough & Loftin, Tyler, 181; Douglas, Rhome & co., Larissa, 36; Boren & Long, Tyler, 47 . . . Freshel [sic] Smith & Goodman, Tyler, 19; Cousins & Saunders, Tyler, 3; Clapp & Brown, Troupe, 13; J H Brown & Co, Tyler, 18; C Kahn, Starville [sic], 1; A Underwood, Jamestown, 3; M B Bord, Tyler, 1; R E House, Tyler, 3.
           
L. C. De Lisle & Co.—C. L. Collins, Tyler, 1 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 29, 1866, p. 2, c. 4
           
The following named gentlemen constitute the Supreme Court of Texas:
           
Hon. S. P. Donley, of Smith, Associate Justice.
           
Thomas Smith, of Smith, Clerk at Tyler.
Terms of the United States District Court.—Eastern District-- . . . Western District.—
           
Tyler, 4th Monday in April and 1st Monday in November. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], January 2, 1867, p. 3, c. 2

List of Post-Offices in Texas

Starrville, Smith                                                Mrs. Sarah Ann Duke
Tyler, Smith                                                      R. P. Derrington 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], January 3, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
The returns for the first District in the Congressional election show that for the short term or 39th Congress, Chilton received 1,614 votes; Burroughs 706; Camp 458; Norton 431; Word 230; Rainey 227; Ochiltree 139; and 105 scattering.
           
For the 40th Congress, Camp received 1,152, Burroughs 1,128, Word 752, Chilton 449, Ochiltree 420, Norton 300, Rainey 314, and 5 scattering. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], January 10, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
What has become of the Tyler Reporter?—We have not received a copy for about a month and want to know the reason why.  The "Index" comes regularly to hand but no Reporter.  Friend Douglas have you scratched the Flag from your "X" list, and resolved to cut off our acquaintance entirely?  Unless we hear from you soon, we shall be forced to believe that you run that elegant buggy you bought in N. O. during our visit so much that you have neglected the printing machine.  Send on the Reporter and oblige. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], January 24, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
[Summary:  Address of O. M. Roberts in Marshall.  Very hard to read] 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], January 26, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter one of our most valuable exchanges, thus discourses of the Sunday law:
           
"The Sunday law, which has just gone into operation, seems to work very well here.  We notices that the business houses were closed throughout the day, and there seemed to be no business of any kind doing.  Some vitality may be given to the law just now by the restraining presence of the grand jury, which has been in session for some days; but we trust and believe that most of our business men are actuated by motives of propriety and morality sufficiently to induce them to thus respect the Sabbath day at the mere suggestion without the force of the law.  This state of affairs may appear dull, but we submit that it is more compatible with decency, good order, and the requirements of good society than the promiscuous bustle and confusion consequent upon business pursuits."
           
Our respected cotemporary [sic] also favors, as we do, white instead of colored emigration, and very appropriately and truthfully says:
           
"We venture the opinion that Texas already has a sufficient supply of freedmen—enough at least to experiment with, and enough to test the efficiency of her labor and vagrant laws, even if those laws receive the countenance and support of the freedmen's bureau, of which there is at present a gratifying prospect.  We should certainly not encourage colored emigration unless we can be assured that they consist of a better article than most of those now on hand."
           
The Tyler Index says:
           
"A young man named Choate Reeves was taken up by the civil authority of our place for some misdemeanor and fined; failing to plank up he was remanded to jail.  Shortly afterwards a squad of men came into town, no one knew them, paid Reeves's fine and other indebtedness and took him off a prisoner.  Their conduct, we must say was very suspicious, and a few days ago we learned that Reeves's body was found in Sabine bottom, near the line of wood county with eleven balls shot into him." 

DALLAS HERALD, February 2, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
We clip the following item (says the Palestine News,) from the Tyler Index.  Our community will remember the subject of this notice while in this place.  He was a reckless young man, and only met the fate common to men of his habits:
           
"A young man named Choate Reeves was taken up by the civil authority of our place for some misdemeanor and fined; failing to plank up he was remanded to jail.  Shortly afterwards a squad of men came into town, no one knew them, paid Reeves' fine and other indebtedness and took him off a prisoner.  Their conduct, we must say was very suspicious, and a few days ago we learned that Reeves' body was found in Sabine bottom, near the line of Wood county, with eleven balls shot into him. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], February 7, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
We were pleased to meet with Mr. H. V. Hamilton, one of the editors of the Tyler Reporter in Marshall a few days since.  The Reporter is neatly printed and ably conducted, and gives unmistakable evidence of prosperity. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], February 16, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
We have had the pleasure, during the week, of a visit from our friend, H. V. Hamilton, one of the editors of the Tyler Reporter.  He was looking well and as lively as usual.  The Reporter is one of the best papers in the interior, and we are pleased to know that it is on the high road to prosperity—it deserves success. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], February 16, 1867, p. 2, c. 3
           
Col. George W. Chilton, addressed the people of Marshall at the Court House, on Tuesday evening last.  In consequence of the unfavorable state of the weather, there was not as many in attendance as was anticipated, but the assembly, nevertheless, was very respectful in attention.  We did not hear the entire speech, but have been informed that it differed very little in important facts and disclosures from that of Judge Roberts, of which we gave a synopsis a few weeks ago.  He said that the President was, and would remain, true to the Constitution and the Union, and was confident of his ability to maintain and preserve both.  He has a majority of the Supreme Court, the people with him, and although treason may uncover its horrid head in high places, and fanaticism with its monstrous engines of revolution and corruption attempt the destruction of the Government, he is still undaunted, and is hopeful of being enabled, by the strength, counsel and support of the conservative element, to restore the Union to its former position of peace, power and glory.  He had warred for five years against Southerners who sought only a division of the Government; he could not be expected to do less against those who sought its destruction.
           
The Colonel, in conclusion, counseled prudence and vigilance on the part of all, and industry, activity, energy, enterprise and hopefulness by the young, the brave and the strong.  We had much to live for, and much for which to hope.  There was now no need, and this was not a time to despair.
           
His speech was delivered in a plain, unostentatious, conversational manner; contained much good and wholesome instruction, and was well received.  He left on Wednesday's stage for his home in Tyler. 

DALLAS HERALD, March 23, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
           
The weather prophets are predicting that the fruit crops in this latitude will be destroyed this year by late frost.  O, hush!  What, no peach cobblers or rolls; no plum puddings; no apple dumplings; no blackberry tarts; no jam; no jelly; no ________, good gracious!—Tyler Reporter. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN, March 30, 1867, p. 2, c. 9
           
The Tyler Reporter, of the 29th, thus concludes a leading article on the situation under the Sherman bill:
           
As to what course we should pursue at present the veriest tyro in politics could decide the question.  We have left us "Hopson's choice."  We are simply to do what we are compelled to do.  This is required of us in the part we are to play in the highly entertaining farce which is now being enacted.  We are the "stock actor," the "boys of all work," the anything, and should of course support the "stars."  It is quite certain that we will perform our part to the best of our ability; but to say that we will proceed with "alacrity and delight," would be a slight exaggeration, as we have never had much training in this kind of business. 

DALLAS HERALD, April 13, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
           
"Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Montgomery with a detachment of fifty or sixty U. S. troops, reached this place a few days ago.  We suppose the intention is to keep this body of troops stationed here permanently while the State is under military rule.  We have not formed the acquaintance of Col. M., but understand he comes well recommended as a soldier and gentlemen.  We trust the intercourse between soldier and citizen maybe attended by no occurrence to prevent a mutual good opinion of each other.  We understand that a branch of the freedmen's bureau will be opened here.—Tyler Reporter. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], May 11, 1867, p. 2, c. 6
           
Shermanized Meeting in Tyler.—We learn from the Index, that a meeting of citizens, "regardless of color," was held in Tyler, on the 1st inst., at which white and black men spoke, in Tyler, on the 1st inst., at which white and black men spoke, and in which the spirit of radicalism seemed to predominate, judging from the published report of the proceedings as we find them in the columns of the Index.
                       
"Black spirits and whites,
                       
Red spirits and gray,
                       
Mingle, mingle, mingle,
                       
Ye that mingle, may!"
           
But as for us we have no appetite or stomach for such sport.  The military bill does not force us into such humiliating performances, and whilst we are too good a soldier to disobey the commands of a superior, we are at the same time "too old" to anticipate or overdo them.  We will wait for "further orders." 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], May 12, 1867, p. 1, c. 5
[Summary:  Mollie E. Moore read her own poem at a tableaux "for the benefit of the sufferers east of the Mississippi river."] 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], May 14, 1868, p. 2, c. 5 [sic?  falls in 1867 microfilm]

K.K.K. vs. L.L.

            The very name of the KKK.s sends terror and consternation to the "truly loil" of the country, and a yell of despair and persecution is raised from every nook and hamlet, that hideous and ghastly forms are to be seen stalking abroad the earth and feeding upon carcasses and drenching the land with the blood of those that truly love the old Flag.  As to whether this Klan does actually exist, or whether the Gods have sent for spirits from the regions of the other world to vindicate his cause and send death and destruction to his enemies, as he did in the days of Sodom, or whether it be an apparition of a debauched mind, we cannot say; but there is one thing that we do know, that from a private letter from Tyler we learn that a few nights since the Leaguers held a grand meeting, far out in the dismal, dark recesses of the woods, and amidst their exultations behold, the forms of several individuals of ghostly characters were seen approaching, and they cried and said, what meanneth this, surely these persons intendeth us harm; but a voice answereth and saith, nay verily, we be brethren and Judges of the Supreme Court, and cometh here in the wilderness to enlighten thee, and to teach you to be brave—be vigilant—sleep not; know no sympathy, relentless host.  The sword is sharp and springs from its scabbard; the bullet must bound from its chamber—be quick—be sure—be ready to send death to all the Great Radical Cyclops of the nation.  This is the class that is opposing all secret organizations.  What impudence and shame should attach to them.  The idea of the Judges of the Supreme Court, those whom we have been taught to look to for wise counsel, ganging to the woods in the dark hour of night to harangue a crowd of negroes, is too contemptible to consider for a moment. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], May 15, 1867, p. 6, c. 1
           
In a paper like the Telegraph on the editorial columns of which several writes [sic] are employed, sentiments are occasionally expressed which are entirely at variance with the general tone of the paper.  This misfortune happened to us yesterday morning.  A paragraph encouraging drunkenness occurred in an editorial which we most decidedly disavow and condemn.—Houston Telegraph.
           
In a paper like the Telegraph, such variations are not very strange; but we are gratified to know that there is no worse reason for their happening.—Tyler Reporter.  

DALLAS HERALD, May 18, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
           
The United States Circuit and District Courts are now in session at this place—Hon. Thos. Duval, U. S. District Judge, presiding.  On last Wednesday the Grand Jury was organized.  The charge of the Court was concise, clear, able, and evinced the right spirit.  E. D. Turner, Esq., our excellent United States District Attorney is in attendance.  D. A. Nunn, George L. Hill, James Turner, Wm. A. Stuart, Sam. A. Roberts and W. D. Reagan, Esqs., were on motion of Gen. T. J. Jennings, admitted to practice in the above courts.  As the Supreme Court is also in session, the surrounding counties are numerously and well represented by the members of the legal profession.  Tyler Index. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], May 25, 1867, p. 2, c. 6
           
The Tyler Reporter publishes an account of the wounding, and subsequent arrest and imprisonment of a negro man, in that place, for an attempted violation of the person of a young lady of that county. 

DALLAS HERALD, June 1, 1867, p. 2, c. 6
           
The editor of the Trinity New, has recently passed over the country from Palestine to Tyler.  He found corn very scarce on the road; very few farmers have enough to last them until the present crop is made.  He states that a larger crop of corn has been planted this spring than ever before.  The citizens of Tyler are making an effort to have the State university located at that place, and he things there is a strong probability that they will be successful. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 1, 1867, p. 1, c. 4
           
The Henderson Times has had several articles touching the subject of the barking of the Henderson dogs.  Let them have the freedom of bark, Dodson.  Southern dogs should not be denied this ancient right, since they did not participate in the rebellion.—Tyler Reporter. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 1, 1867, p. 2, c. 7
           
The pro-tem of the Flag has got himself into business at last.  A communication appears in the Tyler Index signed "Union Men," in which our friend is denominated the Rev. Dr.; he is charged with falsehood, persecution of Union men, and an editor not to be tolerated.  Furthermore he is warned that this abusive copy of his paper, has been forwarded to Gen. Griffin, evidently with a view to have the paper suppressed.  The article criticised is among the most truthful the pro-tem ever wrote.  If Gen. Griffin has any confidence in our judgment, and we know he ought to have, he will find that the author or authors of this communication about as miserable and depraved a set of scamps as can be found any where, unworthy of the confidence or respect of anybody.  They were during the war "neither flesh, fowl, nor good red herring."  The Dr. happened to hit them in a tender place.
           
The Index is an intemperate radical paper, and we are shocked to see the advertisements of our friends in it. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 1, 1867, p. 2, c. 8
           
The Crockett Sentinel says, that the Hon. S. P. Donley of the Supreme Court of Texas, was recently married to a widow lady in the town of Tyler, Texas. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], June 7, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
           
At Tyler, on the 25th, Dr. Jowers addressed the Freedmen.  Some of his advice was good, though the language he used was more forcible than discreet.  The words "lie" and "liar" are not often used by judicious speakers. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 8, 1867, p. 2, c. 9
           
We clip the subjoined items from the Tyler Reporter:
           
[fold in paper] freedman, concluding to take an airing a few nights ago, betook himself to the hospitality of a convenient bench on the side of the street near one of our drinking saloons, and was soon wrapped in the tender embraces of Morpheus.  We suppose he was doing pretty well; but sometime in the night some one, perhaps having a spite at the "sleeping beauty," or envying him his quiet repose, proceeded to arouse him summarily by drawing the sharp side of a knife or some other edged tool across his woolly pate, just to "chase the dream away," opening it to the skull for some inches, making a very severe and ugly, but, we understand, not dangerous gash.  This unfortunate descendant of Ham is said, to labor under the disadvantage of a rather bad character, having recently left Van Zandt county to avoid the law.  It is supposed that some "colored gentleman" did the rash act, as we understand there was considerable whisky and some difficulty among a part of them in that part of town the same evening.  The negro says he was asleep when the wound was inflicted, and has no idea who did it.
           
By a notice published elsewhere in this paper, it will be seen that the publication of the Trinity News has ceased.  Mr. W. F. Hamilton will resume his active connection with the Reporter.  Mr. Ed. W. Smith retires from the business.
           
Most of the people in this immediate vicinity are apprised of the disturbance which was anticipated last Monday.  The reports which were float were, perhaps, principally unfounded, as there was no indication of difficulty through the day.  At an early hour Lieut. Morso, with his company of U. S. troops under arms, made his appearance on the public square, manifesting a readiness to suppress disturbances and protect the town from violence, which must have been gratifying to the citizens.  such conduct on the part of the military goes a long way toward establishing friendship between soldier and citizen.  We commend col. Montgomery and the troops for this promptness even upon the "very appearance of evil.""

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 8, 1867, p. 2, c. 6
           
The Tyler Reporter complimenting the ability of the newspapers of Northern Texas, says:
           
"With such men as DeArmond, Wortham and Lewis controlling her press, Northern Texas will stand as a fortress against the ingress of radicalism." 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], June 13, 1867, p. 2, c. 7
           
We make the following extract from the Times [Henderson] of the 13th inst., in reference to some important suits which have recently been instituted:
           
Heavy Suits.—E. B. Turner, U. S. District Attorney for the Western District of Texas, has instituted two important suits in the Federal courts at Austin:
           
The United States of America vs. E. B. Nichols, John C. Robertson, J. R. Armstrong, J. M. Norris, Thos. J. Devine, W. G. Miller, C.  S. Cleveland, D. M. Pendergrast, F. W. Latham, and Jerome B. Robertson;
           
The United States of America vs. John C. Robertson, J. R. Armstrong, D. M. Pendergrast, J. M. Norris, Thos. J. Devine, W. G. Miler, C. S. Cleveland, Samuel Maverick, F. W. Latham and Jerome B. Robertson.
           
The suits are in action of trespass and for damages.  The damages, in the first named suit, are laid at five hundred thousand dollars, in the second, at two million dollars.
           
The grounds of the actions, as we gather, are about as follows:  The parties defendant, were members of the State Convention in 1861 that passed the ordinance of secession, and by the convention were appointed a committee of public safety, and in the discharge of their prescribed duties, and under order of the convention took into possession all United States government property within the State of Texas, and turned the same over to the Confederate States authorities.  This is, in short the sum total of the ground of action.
           
At the close of the war, whatever of this property was remaining was turned over to the United States government.  The parties sued, at no time ever claimed or exercised individual ownership over said property or any part of it.  If they are liable in damages the members of the convention that appointed them and the people who elected the members of the convention, all were aiders and abettors in the premises.
           
We regret that the District Attorney has thought it his duty to bring such an action—we can see no possible good to result from it. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], June 13, 1867, p. 2, c. 7
           
No more carrying of weapons in the precincts of the post of Tyler, as the following military order which we find in the Tyler Index will show:
                                               
                                    Headquarters, Post of Tyler.
                                               
                                                Tyler, Smith Co., Texas,
                                               
                                                            May 31st, 1867.
General Order, No.     [blank]
           
The custom of Carrying concealed weapons having a tendency to provoke lawless acts, it is hereby ordered that on and after the 1st day of June, 1867, no person within the limits of this Post, will be allowed to carry such deadly weapon of any description, without a written permission from the Commanding officer of the Post, under penalty of forfeiture of weapon, imprisonment and fine.
           
By order of
           
B'vt Lt Col. D. L. Montgomery.
                       
Signed.
           
C. E. Morse, 1st Lieut, 26 U. S. Inft'y,
                       
                        Post Adjt. 

DALLAS HERALD, June 15, 1867, p. 4, c. 2
           
Eleventh Registration District No. 6               Smith
           
[duties also given] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], June 18, 1867, p. 1, c. 3
           
A meeting of the bar of Tyler county [sic?] was held on May 23d, Hon. O. M. Roberts presiding.  A memorial to Gen. Griffin was forwarded soliciting that officer to modify order 13.
           
The County Court was unable to proceed for want of a jury. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], June 18, 1867, p. 4, c. 3
                                               
                                    Headquarters, Post of Tyler,   }
                       
                                                            Tyler, Smith county, Texas,     }
                                               
                                    May 31, 1867.
General Order, No. 2
           
The custom of carrying concealed weapons, having a tendency to provoke lawless acts, it is hereby ordered that on and after the first day of June, 1867, no person within the limits of this Post, will be allowed to carry deadly weapons of any description, without written permission from the commanding officer of the Post, under penalty of forfeiture of weapon, imprisonment and fine.
           
By order of
                       
B'vt Lt. Col. Montgomery
                                               
            C. E. Morse,
                       
1st Lt. 26th U. S. Infantry, Post Adjt.
                       
This order will be enforced by
                                               
            John H. Morrison
                       
Sub. Ass't. Com. Bureau of R. F. & A. L.
--Tyler Reporter. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN, June 21, 1867, p. 4, c. 2

Marshall Republican

            It has been a number of months since we saw a copy of that amiable sheet, known to the world as the Marshall Republican.  In the Tyler Index, we find the following extracts, by which we see that it is the same unconverted sinner we used to know:
   
                     "The Index is an intemperate radical paper, and we are shocked to see the 
            advertisements of our friends in it."
   
                     The worst, and as we conceive, the most alarming feature of the times, politically, is 
            the readiness and alacrity with which prominent Southern men yield to the demands of the 
            radicals.  Poor, miserable moral cowards, unworthy of public trust or public confidence, honored 
            above their deserts, they have abandoned their principles, and in a mean spirit of truculency and
            subserviency, bowed their necks to a yoke, which there is only a temporary power to enforce.  
           
But if it were, as we believe, different, and confiscation, and banishment and executions were to 
            follow, we would risk all and prefer death to a loss of constitutional freedom.
           
Whenever we find a "last ditcher," we are pretty sure to find him hankering after the flesh pots.  With all his great chivalry and magnanimity of soul, this Marshall man has an eye of envy on a few poor advertisements, that ought to be beneath the contempt of his generous soul.  These fellows, so ready to incur confiscation and banishment, and hanging, are pretty sure to take care of number one. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 22, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
           
An attempt was made to murder and rob Col. S. D. Wood, of this county, on the evening of the 16th.  He was on his way to Tyler, and when about four miles from Marshall, he was fired at by some assassin on the roadside, and only providentially escaped being killed by his mare springing forward just as the gun was fired—six shot striking the side of the animal just behind the saddle skirt.  That man ought to be dancing on a rope. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], June 22, 1867, p. 2, c. 8
           
The Tyler Reporter of the 12th publishes the following:
           
About 200 additional troops arrived at this post last week.  Quite a number of the "boys in blue" have been enjoying a short furlough after their long march, and have created fun for many by sundry exhibitions of pugilism, principally among themselves, but in which an occasional "darkey" has been assigned a part.
           
The weather for the last week has been as good as could be desired for the growing crops.  Offers to deliver new corn at 50 cents per bushel have been made at this place.  Let immigrants come forward. 

WEEKLY AUSTIN REPUBLICAN, June 27, 1867, p. 3, c. 2

The Reason Why

            Statements are often found in our papers like this:  "The District Court in Tyler, Smith county, had to adjourn without trying any cases, being unable to find a jury, white or black, under Order 13.  A memorial signed by the members of the bar was forwarded to General Griffin, soliciting that officer to modify his jury order.
           
The impression sought to be conveyed is, that the execution of said order is impracticable, and that its attempted enforcement results in the suspension of the courts of justice.
           
A letter received direct from Smith county, and from a person well known and well informed, may throw some light on this disloyal and insincere proceeding.
           
The writer states that after those summoned to serve as jurors were called in, Order 13 was read [tear in paper] and the question put, "Can you [tear in paper]
           
It is, perhaps, sufficient to state that one of the moving spirits of this memorial was Geo. W. Chilton, now under indictment for the kidnapping and murder of Col. Montgomery, on the Rio Grande.
           
Our informant goes on to say that of the number examined at least fifty were willing and able, with clear consciences, to take the oath if it had been fairly explained, and the proper distinctions drawn between acts of hostility and war, and those of affection and common humanity done to children, neighbors, or hungry suffering men, many [tear in paper].—Flake's Bulletin. 

WEEKLY AUSTIN REPUBLICAN, July 4, 1867, p. 1, c. 6
           
The Tyler Reporter urges the importance of all persons registering who are entitled to do so under the registration law, and says that with 71,000 white votes against 86,000 blacks, success over the negroes and Radicals is certain.—Livingston Republican.  

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], July 13, 1867, p. 3, c. 1
           
The Fourth of July was celebrated day before yesterday by the military garrison of this place, who turned out in their best style to do honor to that day, which every American has reason to be proud of.—Tyler Index. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], July 19, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
[Summary:  Field officers' courts, detailed by Bvt. Major Gen. Griffin]
           
Brevet Colonel Levi C. Bootes, Major Twenty-sixth U. S. Infantry for a Field Officer's Court at the Post of Tyler, Texas. . . . 

DALLAS HERALD, July 20, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
           
Mr. E. E. Douglas, a former typo in the Tyler Reporter office, and late a gallant member of the 1st Texas Battery, commanded by his brother Capt. Jas. P. Douglas, paid us a visit a few days since.  He is now in the extensive house of North, Blush & Mason, Wholesale Dealers, in Fancy Goods, Stationery, Perfumery, Cutlery, &c., 85 Magazine Street, New Orleans.  This is one of the most extensive houses in the Crescent City, and Mr. Douglas is well deserving an extensive patronage. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], July 23, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
           
Registration is progressing here steadily.  Up to yesterday noon, 505 persons had registered, of which 337 are colored and 168 white.—Tyler Index, July 12."
            The following named gentlemen compose the Board of Registration for Van Zandt county, and commenced the work of registration on the 3d inst.:
           
Dr. B. F. McCarty, John Carter, and f.m.c. Jerry Wylie.  Lieutenant Hobbs, clerk.—Tyler Index, July 6.
           
Decline in Corn.—Two weeks ago, corn could not be bought in this market for less than $2.25 per bushel.  We are informed that new corn can be engaged at 25 cents per bushel.—Tyler Index, July 10.  

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], July 25, 1867, p. 2, c. 3
           
Baptist Associational Meetings in Texas for 1867.
           
Cherokee, October 12th, at Tyler, Smith County. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 1, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter says:
           
The registration, as far as we have reports, is as follows:   Tyler, whites, 272; colored 578.  Flora, whites 94, colored 121, Total, whites 366; colored 699.  Aggregate, 1066. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 3, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
Messrs. S. D. Wood & Co., are about to establish a paper at Tyler, under the title of the "National Index."  From the tone of the prospectus we suppose it will be a black republican paper, and support the radical party of this State. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 3, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
Heavy Bail.—Justice Donley, of the Supreme Court, after being engaged six days at Tyler, in the examination of the evidence of the State vs. A. Middleton, for the murder of Mrs. Eliza L. McClanahan, of Van Zandt county, fixed the amount of bail at ten thousand dollars, subsequently reducing it to eight thousand dollars.  The accused failed to give bail, and remains in the custody of the Sheriff of Smith county. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 7, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
Troubles in Smith County.—Reports have reached this place for eight or ten days representing a state of affairs in Smith county that were most deplorable.  The negroes acted very badly on one occasion, marching around the public square with guns, and evincing by their manner that they desired to provoke strife.
           
On Saturday evening last a difficulty occurred at Tyler, between two citizens, a Mr. Perry and a Mr. Hut Murry.  Before any blows were struck a U. S. Sergeant, by the name of Crowley, connected with the stationed troops, interfered, and taking a stick from Perry struck Murry one or two blows and the latter drew his knife, and inflicted several wounds upon the Sergeant.  Hut Murry was immediately arrested and taken to jail.  At night a number of soldiers attacked the jail, with the intention of taking vengeance upon the prisoner.  Lt. Col. Montgomery, commanding the troops, fortunately made his appearance and stopped the riotous proceedings.  The next night the soldiers returned in stronger force, secured the keys, brought forth the prisoner and shot him.
           
We learn there were a sufficient number of troops guarding the jail to have prevented this outrage, had they performed their duty.  Murry, Perry and the Sergeant are all represented to have been intoxicated.  This is bad conduct on the part of a portion of the troops.  From what we have heard of Col. Montgomery, the guilty parties are likely to be punished. 

WEEKLY AUSTIN REPUBLICAN, August 8, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
Another Republican [fold in paper] the prospectus of the National Index, a republican paper which will be published at Tyler, Texas.  We rejoice to learn that a journal which will fearlessly advocate republican principles, is to make its appearance in that region.  We hope the loyal people of Eastern Texas will give Messrs. Wood & Co. a liberal support.  The following extract from the prospectus will show the character and object of the paper.  The subscription price of the Weekly National Index is $3 in currency or its equivalent in specie.  Send in your orders:
           
In announcing the publication of this paper the undersigned deems it not proper [sic] to say that his purpose will be to place in the hands of his readers a journal at once national, loyal, and republican in its character.  Laying aside dead issues, the discussion of which cannot possibly result in any good, it will be his aim to assist, to the extent of his energy and ability, in building up in our midst a Union republican party, one that will fearlessly shake itself loose from the trammels of old prejudices and move forward to the accomplishment of the great end which we all profess to be anxious to see consummated, the restoration of our unhappy country to its place in the republican sisterhood, upon principles of justice, liberty and equality.  The task which he has undertaken he feels to be an arduous one, and he hopes and expects that every loyal man who honestly desires the restoration of the Union, will come forward and assist him in making the experiment a successful one.            *            *            *
           
With these few hastily written words of explanation as to the course we shall pursue, we submit our enterprise to the unbiased and, we hope, unprejudiced judgment of a discriminating public, hoping by energy, industry and above all by an unqualified devotion to the interests of our common country, to merit and obtain a liberal share of public patronage.  The Index will be 26 by 39 inches in size, and the first number issued sometime in August next.
                       
                                                            S. D. Wood & Co., Proprietors.
           
Tyler, Texas, July 16, 1867. 

DALLAS HERALD, August 10, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
Mr. W. A. Wherry, of Marshall, Texas, proposes to build a line of Telegraph from Marshall to this place, upon certain conditions being complied with on the part of our citizens.—Tyler Reporter.
           
The following articles are from the Tyler Reporter of the 31st ulto:
           
RIOTOUS PROCEEDINGS—VIOLATION OF MILITARY ORDERS.—Our town was thrown into considerable excitement on Saturday evening, by the report of a riot between the negroes and white citizens.  There was a general preparation for defence in portions of the town, but the affair passed off without bloodshed.
           
A band of negroes, numbering about twenty, had been during the evening, marching with arms to the music of a drum, along some of the back streets.  About dark, this gang marched up into the public square.  In passing the residence of Mr. J. P. Smith, insulting language passed between them and Mr. Jo. Smith, son of J. P. Smith.  Shortly afterwards, Mr. Jo. Smith went to the bar-room of Mr. Scott, when the negroes marched up in front of the bar-room and halted.  An altercation passed between the parties again, Mr. Smith having a loaded gun, which he found in the room.—Our informant who was present, is not positive how the firing took place, but Mr. Smith fired off the gun, which was prevented from taking effect by Mr. Scott, who threw up the muzzle.  The negroes fired a number of shots at Mr. Smith, none taking effect.  The rattle of musketry and the roll of the drum on our streets sounded very much as if the time for arguments had passed, when every man is expected to obey the first law of nature and protect himself.  The fact being reported to Col. Montgomery, he sent out a detachment of troops to preserve order and disperse the mob.  We hear many reports of threats and incendiary language on the part of the negroes, but will not repeat them.
           
The following we are informed, were among the band of negroes:  Henry Allen, commanding; John Brown, armed with a gun; Lee Black, armed with a gun; Lee _____, (recently in jail,) armed with a gun, Henry Lampkin, drummer.  Many others were present, armed with pistols, &c.  We understand that no authority has been given for this carrying of deadly weapons in violation of Order No. 2, from Post Commandent [sic], and suppose that the parties will at least be held accountable for its violation.  We have heard several versions of the probable intention of this armed mob.—We adhere to the opinion that one Squire Clinkscales, f.m.c., who has been in this vicinity several days, has represented that he cannot safely return to his former home at Starrville, for fear of violence from some one, and to enable himself to return with safety he has been engaged in recruiting and arming this company, which was to have taken up the line of march on that place on the evening which the row occurred, but was prevented from so doing from some cause.  It may be regarded as fortunate for the peace of that community that this mob did not fulfill its mission, as there are few towns which would not prevent their occupation by a band of armed negroes, when the country is suffering, as at present, from apprehensions of riot.  These apprehensions, we are informed, owing to circumstances, are participated in by the people of Starrville and vicinity, from the fact that a freedman was killed by some unknown person near that place a short time since, which, we understand, had led to a threat to burn up the place.
           
Some of the scenes on our streets on Monday last, were disgusting beyond measure.  We have made some mention of this in another place.  We are informed of a transaction in front of Mrs. Gant's boarding house, which is a disgrace to any town and to any civilized people.—Two negro women were passing the place, both very drunk when a dispute arose between them which soon matured into a fight.  An eye and ear witness tells us that the language and conduct of the parties was hideous and indecent in the highest degree.  No one being authorized to interfere with them, they discontinued their feats of barbarism only when they saw fit.
           
We have been told within the past few days, that Col. Boots, in command of this Post, and Col. Montgomery, in temporary command during the illness of Col. Boots have both expressed a desire that the town government be resumed, and have declared their willingness to co-operate with the civil authorities fully in the execution of the municipal laws.  We hope this is so, and that the citizens of the town will feel sufficient interest in their own protection and quiet to consult the [c. 6] military authorities as to plan of election or organization, &c., and get the municipal machinery to work at once.
           
The condition of affairs in this portion of Texas under the operation of the military despotism, is truly distressing to a formerly free people.  Trial by jury is denied to our citizens, warrants for arrest are issued without oath, upon the representation of the most irresponsible persons, and parties are put upon trial without indictment by grand juries, and the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus is denied those deprived of liberty.
           
This short recital of our condition would convey to the mind of any citizen of any portion of the civilized world all that is oppressive and intolerable in government.  Four of the most sacred provisions of the Constitution formed by our fathers are violated in the maintenance of this condition of things in this country, which must still be considered a portion of the territory of the United States, and ought to be entitled to the protection of its laws.
           
We had hoped that the military government of the Southern States would be conducted in a manner so element, and in such conformity to the spirit of our formerly free institutions, as to be borne with patience and without complaint, while it might speedily perform its mission, and give place to the mild sway of a good civil government.  In this, however, we fear we are to be sadly disappointed, both in the clemency of the military government and the character of the civil government which is to take its place when it is suspended.  At present the life and property of the white man is completely at the mercy of illiterate and vicious freedmen, since the Freepmen's [sic] Bureau is the only tribunal of justice in the country which retains any vitality, and before this court the white man generally has to submit to the demands of the negro, as his word is held in higher estimation than that of his white neighbor.  The military in many places are careful to restrain the whites with rigid orders and by the infliction of heavy penalties, while the negroes are protected, not in the enjoyment of liberty only, but in the exercise of an unbridled license.  The result is, we are now suffering the ills of the worst government that ever cursed an enlightened people, and the indications are that our situation may yet grow worse.  We hope, in that event, that our people will be able to summon to their aid an amount of endurance adequate to the occasion; but we have grounds for feat that they will not be able patiently to endure, and may be driven to such desperation as will lead to a condition of things truly distressing.  Our people are patient, they are prudent, they are wise, but we may not hope that they possess these virtues in so large a degree as to endure all things.
           
A number of freedwomen were drunk on the streets on Monday morning, and guilty of indecent and turbulent conduct and language, committing numerous assault upon each other.  During the same day a freedman, residing near Black's stable, administered a castigation to his wife, who was drunk.
           
The Messrs. Chauncey, who were arrested some time since, and are now held in custody by the military at this place, have been able to produce the freedman whom they were charged with killing, alive and uninjured.  The proof was, we understand, conclusive against them until they produced the living freedman, which was considered strong in rebuttal! 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 14, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
           
Mr. W. A. Wherry of Marshall, Texas proposes to build a line of telegraph from Marshall to this place, upon certain conditions being complied with on the part of our citizens.  WE think well of the propositions, and hope that those interested will call on us for further information on the subject.—Tyler Reporter.
           
It appears to us that it would be of great advantage to the business men of Tyler to have a line connecting them with Marshall, Shreveport, New Orleans and the Eastern cities. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 15, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter is out in quite a lengthy article, showing clearly the advantages Eastern Texas has over the older States, and advocating its claims to those who design emigrating this fall.  Read the following:
           
People of the older States, instead of risking everything in emigrating to distant regions, should come directly to Eastern Texas.  Here we have homes for all.  Here plenty smiles on every side.  Here enterprise and industry have their sure reward.  Fortunes can and will be made here within the next few years.  Our soil is productive and easy of cultivation.  Our climate is salubrious and genial.  Timber and water are abundant and excellent.  Corn, cotton, wheat, oats, rice, barley, tobacco, sugar cane, potatoes, and almost every kind of garden vegetables, grow side by side on the same farm.  Fruits of many kinds, apples, peaches, &c., grow luxuriantly.  It is a country remarkably adapted to the culture of the grape.  The Catawba, Scupernong, El Paso, Delaware and many other varieties being now successfully cultivated, which all grow as well as our native grape, which only needs a little cultivation to make it equal in all respects to any other grape in this country.  Most grasses, too, succeed well here, but have received but little attention as yet. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 15, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The citizens of Smith county are holding public meetings for the purpose of inaugurating some plan for securing emigration and bringing into cultivation and market the unimproved lands.  This is a wise move on their part, and should be imitated by others.  Large landholders have it in their power, by liberal combinations and offering favorable terms, to induce a heavy emigration to Texas, and in a few years the State would be densely settled, and all being producers would abound. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], August 16, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
A Negro Registrar Stands on Dignity and Asserts His Rights.—The Tyler Register [sic?] of the 31st ult., relates the following:
           
On Monday last two persons, non-residents of Canton beat, made such violent demonstrations against the registrars, then sitting at Canton as to produce some apprehensions of of [sic] violence whereupon Captain Flinn, J. P., issued a warrant and had the parties arrested.  Wm. Taylor, f.m.c., member of the board of this county, was in town yesterday and reports that on Monday many of the applicants for registration at Canton, demanded that he (Taylor,) should administer the oath.  The other members of the board objecting to his officiating in the registering of white men, the board suspended further operations at that place. Taylor had appealed to higher authority to establish his rights in the matter.
           
Taylor was formerly a slave in this county—is represented as intelligent and honest—also deferential in his intercourse with the whites.—Rusk Observer.
           
Taylor is undoubtedly right.  The negro has the law on his side—and the white associates have betrayed their ignorance in attempting to rule otherwise. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], August 22, 1867, p. 2, c. 3

From the Tyler Reporter.

            Our town was thrown into excitement on last Saturday evening by a serious difficulty occurring between Mr. H. Murray of this county, and Corporal Crawly, of Company F, 26th regiment U.S.A., in which the latter was, it is feared, mortally wounded being cut with a pocket knife in several places about the neck and face.  We understand both parties were intoxicated, and engaged willingly in the fight.  Mr. Murray surrendered to Col. Marsh, our sheriff, soon after the occurrence, and was carried directly to jail.  The news of the supposed death of the Corporal reaching camps, it was natural that the soldiers should be aroused in behalf of their comrade.  Such was the case, and many of the command ran to town, and were endeavoring to break into jail where the prisoner was protected by the sheriff and three or four men—the strength of the building and the remonstrance of the Sheriff and his party preventing violence on the prisoner, until Col. Montgomery arrived with an armed guard, who restrained the men.  After consultation with others, Col. Montgomery withdrew, leaving a guard, when another attempt was made by the mutineers to force the jail over the guard, when Col. Montgomery hastened to the scene again, and succeeded in thwarting their purpose.
           
Had there been any disposition on the part of any of the numerous citizens present to assist him, Murray could have made his escape immediately after the fight.  If he had made any effort himself he could have escaped, as there were none but citizens present, with the exception of Col. Brown, and he and all the citizens were unarmed.  He showed no disposition to escape, and the citizens aided willingly in his safe keeping.
           
The prisoner remained in jail during Saturday night and Sunday, the jail being guarded by a Sergeant and about twelve men.  On Sunday night, about 9 o'clock, a party of U. S. soldiers, variously estimated at from fifteen to fifty in number charged upon the jail, took the keys from the Sergeant, opened the doors, and seized the prisoner, firing one shot at him in jail, and forcing him out into the yard, where they brutally murdered him, firing three or four shots through his body, and bayoneting him in several places.  This is one of the most brutal outrages which has ever been committed in this country.
           
The deceased is well known here; has lived in this vicinity from boyhood; and when sober an orderly citizen; belongs to a very respectable family, and his unfortunate decease is regretted by many who knew his virtues.  His fault was that of occasional dissipation, and when intoxicated he would attempt to strike down whoever opposed him.
           
At this writing, Capt. S. S. Johnson, J. P. and ex-officio Coroner, is making an effort to ascertain the facts in the case pefore [sic] a jury of inquest.  We shall publish the findings of the jury, as they may vary our statements somewhat.  When shall all these bloody tragedies cease and peace be restored to our country. 

DALLAS HERALD, August 24, 1867, p. 2, c. 3
           
On Saturday evening last a difficulty occurred at Tyler, between two citizens, a Mr. Perry, and a Mr. Hut Murray.  Before any blows were struck a U. S. Sergeant, by the name of  Crowley, connected with the stationed troops, interfered, and taking a stick from Perry struck Murray one or two blows and the latter drew his knife, and inflicted several severe wounds upon the Sergeant.  Hut Murray was immediately arrested and taken to jail.  At night a number of soldiers attacked the jail, with the intention of taking vengeance upon the prisoner.  Lt. Col. Montgomery, commanding the troops, fortunately made his appearance and stopped the riotous proceedings.  The next night the soldiers returned in stronger force, secured the keys, brought forth the prisoner and shot him.
           
We learn there were a sufficient number of troops guarding the jail to have prevented the outrage, had they performed their duty.  Murray, Perry, and the Sergeant are all represented to have been intoxicated.  This is bad conduct on the part of a portion of the troops.  From what we have heard of Col. Montgomery, the guilty parties are likely to be punished.—Marshall Republican, 17th inst. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 24, 1867, p. 2, c. 6
           
The Tyler Reporter, speaking of the murder of J. H. Murray, by a mob of United States soldiers, says:
           
"The prisoner remained in jail during Saturday night and Sunday, the jail being guarded by a Sergeant and about twelve men.  On Sunday night, about 9 o'clock, a party of U. S. soldiers, variously estimated at from fifteen to fifty in number, charged upon the jail, took the keys from the Sergeant, opened the doors, and seized the prisoner, firing one shot at him in the jail, and forcing him out into the yard, where they brutally murdered him, firing three or four shots through his body, and bayoneting him in several places.  This is one of the most brutal outrages which has ever been committed in this country.
           
The Tyler Reporter of the 31st ult., relates the following:
           
One Monday last, two persons, non-residents of Canton Beat, made such violent demonstrations against the registrars, then sitting at Canton, as to produce some apprehensions of violence whereupon Capt. Flinn, J. P., issued a warrant and had the parties arrested.  Wm. Taylor, f.m.c., member of the board of this county, was in town yesterday and reports that on Monday many of the applicants for registration at Canton, demanded that he (Taylor) should administer the oath.  The other mem- [p. 2, c. 7] bers of the board objecting to his officiating in the registering of white men, the board suspended further operations at that place.  Taylor has appealed to higher authority to establish his rights in the matter. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 24, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
(from the ed. of the Trinity Advocate)
           
The stage line from Palestine to Tyler has been reduced to a one-horse arrangement, in consequence of which, there are two or three hundred pounds of mail accumulated at this place every week [Palestine], and which has to be sent back to Crockett and then to Rusk, Henderson, and the Lord only knows where else besides, it being impossible to send it on the outside of a mule by the direct route. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], August 31, 1867, p. 2, c. 7
           
Judge Roberts made a speech at Rusk, on the 21st, upon the necessity of combined efforts to induce immigration to that portion of Eastern Texas.  A society has been formed in Smith county, by persons who propose to give a certain amount of lands, to be sold at a uniform cash price.  Judge Roberts is the Agent of this society, and will visit New Orleans, the States of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, to further its interests, and lay before the people there, the advantages of Texas as an agricultural country. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN, September 10, 1867, p. 4, c. 3
           
Up to August 14th, 1400 votes had been registered in Tyler county [sic?], of which 1000 were colored.  The Reporter says that if all the whites register there will be about 1400 in the county. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 14, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
A negro man, who is suspicioned of being the one who entered and robbed Mr. Welborne's store [at Pine Tree], on the Tyler road, was arrested at this place, and is now in jail.  A similar robbery was committed at Jamestown, about a week previously. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 14, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
           
A sensation rumor was current a few days ago, that Col. Montgomery, in command of the United States troops at Tyler, had been killed.  It was unfounded.  Late intelligence from Tyler, represents everything quiet and that the excitement that had prevailed had entirely subsided. 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], September 21, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The wine crop in this county has been large.  We know not what quantity has been made for export.  It is certain that much more than a supply for home consumption has been secured.  We observe that other counties in eastern Texas have manufactured large quantities also, from the native grape.  We were shown through the cellar of our friend Col. Yarbrough, and find that he has several hundred gallons which bids fair to be excellent.  Although his wine is now and still fermenting, we were able to detect the difference in the several kinds.  He has seven distinct manipulations for manufacturing, producing a marked difference in the flavor, color, aroma, &c.—Tyler Reporter. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN, September 29, 1867, p. 5, c. 2
           
The cotton worm has about run its course in this county, having swept nearly, if not quite all the fields.  It is thought that a full half crop of cotton is made.—Tyler Reporter, Sept. 18.
           
If burglary, and a very bold and successful burglary at that, makes a city, then Tyler has really reached unexpected dimensions in short order.  Every few nights somebody is robbed, and the thief seems to be no respecter of persons, for he visits private houses, store rooms, etc., with the same degree of complacency.—Ibid.  

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], October 5, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Reporter says, that in Smith county, it is thought a full half crop will be made.
           
The Reporter states that Mr. Henry Elliott, residing near Tyler, has been arrested by the military, to be conveyed to Mississippi, to answer the charge of killing a U. S. soldier.
           
The Reporter commenting upon a wedding says, emphatically, "sich [sic] is life," doubtless meaning thereby, that he is not shocked by the occurrence.
           
If burglary, and very bold and successful burglary at that, makes a city, then Tyler has really reached unexpected dimensions in short order.  Every few nights somebody is robbed; and the thief seems to be no respecter of persons, for he visits private houses, store rooms, etc., with the same degree of complacency.
           
Last Thursday night this agent of the devil helped himself to a goodly supply of articles from the store of Mr. McFaddin.  We believe it is not known precisely what or how much he got.  A considerable quantity of goods were recovered next morning, some having been badly hidden not far off, and some thrown on the street nearby for some unknown reason—not, we presume, because they were marked so high!  The entrance was made by breaking a back door.—Reporter. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], October 19, 1867, p. 2, c. 4

The National Index.
--------

            We have received the first number of "The National Index" published at Tyler, Texas, and edited by Col. S. D. Wood of Harrison county.  The paper presents a neat appearance, and doubtless will be hailed as a "messenger" of true loyalty, by the free negro mongrels and radicals of Texas.  Col. Wood is a writer of some ability, and is well calculated to wield a ready pen in vindication of whatever principles he may honestly entertain but it is somewhat surprising to witness how far below the legitimate standard of logical argument, he has fallen in his first debut through the columns of the Index before the people.  The scrutiny of thought and deep seated malignity and hatred displayed clearly indicate what is to be the political course and position of the "Index."  It is Radical in the extreme and judging from the lights before us it is ready to out vie Stevens, Sumner, Butler, &c. (had it the ability) in oppressing and degrading the Southern people.
            Here at this remote day from the bloody tragedies of a war in which the people on both sides were engaged in a life and death struggle to maintain their honest convictions of right, this new light of fanaticism, finding no fault with the masses of the South, goes back and digs up old obsolete "Bugbears" of dragging men from their beds at the still hour of midnight, and hanging them in the presence of their wives and children.  These things have played out, and no longer excite the pulse of the nation.  Graver questions are at issue, and have to be settled the utmost patience of the people is taxed almost to bankruptcy, and the energies of the good men of the country are well directed, restoring the country to its pristine purity.  The leaven of common sense is sweeping through the nation, and the great principles of truth and justice are fast becoming the standard of action, and radicalism is dying out with its own corruptions.
           
We would say to the "Index" that its utmost abilities are demanded to sustain it from its waning destiny.  That "great archangel" that you speak of has sounded his "trump" in some of the Northern States, and it has in nowise aroused the conservatives to stand 'abashed' but upon the other hand its bugle notes are heard with alarm and consternation throughout the Radical camp, and bids fair to crush them before its clarion voice ceases to thrill the nation.  We give an extract from the leading article of the "Index" that our readers may understand for themselves its true spirit.
           
"Four long years of anguish, endured in a monarchial government, where wealth alone was regarded, and poverty a sufficient crime to condemn one to servitude, and cast him in the scale below the negro has sufficed to convert many.  There now remains within their bosoms no love for a cause so utterly depraved for an object which when dissected has proved so wholly corrupt and rotten from centre to circumference, that the stench therefrom would suffocate a nation of less magnitude than ours.  They need only understand the means by which this corrupt mass are to be kept in subjugation thenceforth.  There remains but the two parties, one loyal, one disloyal.  That part loyal has the ascendancy and is going to keep it.  Many of our week brethren and new converts [illegible] when some have [illegible] of the [rest unreadable] 

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], October 19, 1867, p. 3, c. 2
           
We are in receipt of the first number of the National Index, published at Tyler, Texas, and edited by Col. S. D. Wood, for a number of years a citizen of this county.  The paper is large and elegantly printed, at the low price of $3, currency, per annum; but as it is altogether radical in politics, we cannot recommend it to the households of the faithful. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], October 26, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
[Summary:  Article on Miss Mollie E. Moore—very hard to read] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN, November 1, 1867, p. 2, c. 3
           
The wine crop in this county has been large.  We know not what quantity has been made for export.  It is certain that more than a supply for home supply has been secured.  We observe that other counties in the Eastern portion of Texas have manufactured large quantities also from the native grape.—Tyler Reporter. 

DALLAS HERALD, November 2, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
           
Telegraph to Tyler.—We are pleased to be able to announce that Mr. W. A. Wherry, of Marshall, has succeeded in securing sufficient subscriptions of stock to the Texas Telegraph, to complete the line from Marshall to this place.  The line will be constructed and in operation to this place, by the 10th of November.—Tyler Reporter. 

DALLAS HERALD, November 2, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The District Court for Rusk county, failed to hold its fall term at Henderson.  Judge Ector having heard through the newspapers that he had been removed, declined to hold court, and his supposed successor, failed to appear.  It seems that the 6th District is left without a Judge.—Tyler Reporter. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 2, 1867, p. 2, c. 3
           
The Telegraph Line to Tyler—Mr. W. A. Wherry of this place commenced work the first of the present week, putting up his Telegraph line to Tyler, via Henderson, Texas.  He proposes running the line into Tyler about the first of December.
 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN, November 14, 1867, p. 8, c. 2-3

Smith County

            J. F. Rasbury to be county judge, vice Samuel D. Gibbs removed.
           
McD. Lorance to be clerk of county court, vice R. A. Godley removed.
           
J. W. Wright to be clerk of district court, vice George M. Johnston removed.
           
J. A. Robinson to be sheriff, vice Breans [sic] Marsh removed.
[c.3]     Jefferson Calhoun to be assessor and collector of Taxes, vice Wm. J. Smith removed.
           
Joel Bell to county treasurer, vice Wm.  S. Walker removed.
           
Samuel Henderson, Tillman Turner, W. B. Butler, Jr., and John Murphy to be county commissioners, vice David Y. Gaines, John W. McDougal, J. E. Rucker, and B. W. Thompson removed. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], November 23, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
[Summary:  Negro mass meeting in Tyler.  See Marshall Texas Republican

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], November 23, 1867, p. 2, c. 5
           
The Tyler Index says that the U. S. District Court is now in session at that place, and business is being rapidly disposed of.  Judgment given by default in so many cases, brings a peculiar smile to the countenance of that important individual, the Register in Bankruptcy, he seeming to understand the causes.  Gen. T. J. Jennings is acting District Attorney, Mr. Twiner being unable to come.  The business of the State will be taken up on Monday next.
           
The Radical meeting at Tyler, headed by Whitmore and others of his calibre, who are beneath the notice of white people, is thus described by the Reporter:
           
Scene on the Streets of Tyler—Time, last Friday.—About a thousand niggers, on horseback and on foot, marching around the square.  Big nig. squalls out, "Hurrah for the bonnie blue flag!  Another big nig. says "Hush, you damn fool, dat de rebs had."  No difference:  "hurrah for de bonnie blue flag!" rings up and down the smoky lines; demonstrating the clearness of their minds upon the doctrines to which they had just been listening.
           
It seems from the following, from the Tyler Reporter that even the negroes refuse to endorse the proceedings of Whitmore & Co's., Radical meeting at that place:
           
A report has gained circulation that Wm. Taylor, f.m.c., a member of the Board of Registration for this county, participated in and endorsed the proceedings of the Radical meeting here on Thursday and Friday.  We are authorized by him to say that he was only present on Thursday, and does not endorse the proceedings or what war [sic] said in the various speeches of the occasion.  He says that he would rather promote harmony between the two races than assist in producing discord.
           
It is reported through our exchanges that the Federal dead at Tyler, Hempstead, and Lavaca, are to be removed to the military cemetery at Galveston.
           
The Austin Republican, the San Antonio Express, and the Houston Transcript are the only papers in the State that favor Convention, Radico-Negro reconstruction, a negro suffrage State Constitution, negro supremacy, negro jurors, negro officers, State, county, and municipal.
           
The National Index goes the whole hog, and is entitled to be placed at the tail of the list.—Tyler Reporter.
           
Lieut. E. O. Gibson, 26th U. S. Infantry, has been appointed Adjutant of the post at Tyler. 

DALLAS HERALD, November 30, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
[Summary:  Applications for writs of habeas corpus made before Judge Duval, U. S. Circuit Court judge in Tyler.  Denied due to reconstruction acts.] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], December 3, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
After reading such Radical sheets as the San Antonio Express, and Tyler Index, which out-Herod Herod in abusing everything Southern, and misrepresenting the condition of the country in which they live, in every possible manner calculated to do her injury, it is refreshing to turn to Flake's Bulletin, and be made aware that there are conservative Republicans—men who can take a different view of the political wants of the country, from the great mass of the people, and yet labor honestly for the public welfare—Houston Transcript, Nov. 30. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], December 3, 1867, p. 4
           
The Federal Court sitting at Tyler has refused to issue writs of habeas corpus in three cases, in which the relators were imprisoned by military authority.  The ground taken by Judge Dual [sic] in this case is, that the military are superior in all respects to the civil authority, which has no right to review its action. 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], December 4, 1867, p. 1, c. 4
           
Out Telegraph Line.—On last Monday, October 28, Mr. Wherry, with an ample corps of operators, commenced to distribute the poles to their proper places for the new line, from Marshal [sic] to Tyler.  On Wednesday morning, with wagon, cart, ladders, mattocks, spades, cleats, hammers and hatchets, another detachment was raising the poles, nailing on cleats and stretching the wire, and before 11 o'clock they had passed far beyond the eager gaze of those who had looked on so wistfully in the morning.  We had accorded to Mr. Wherry a good deal of energy and practical business qualification, but in this undertaking he has exhibited almost invincible perseverance and industry.  WE are assured, from frequent conversations with Mr. W., and from what we have witnessed, that in the course of fifteen or sixteen days he will be in Henderson, and from thence to Tyler in ten or twelve days more, so that by the 25th or 26th of November we shall be able to converse with our friends in Marshal [sic], Jefferson, and Shreveport, or even those farther off if we wish.  This will be a new era in the history of events for Tyler, and the forerunner, we hope, of more extensive and important improvements in the future.—National Index. 

DALLAS HERALD, December 7, 1867, p. 4, c. 1
           
The Tyler Reporter has quite a lengthy well written report of the negro mass meeting held in that place on the 7th.  Such a scene as was presented on that occasion, no doubt brought the blush of shame to those that had been participants in bringing together such a concourse of negroes, under false pretences.  Gov. Pease, Gov. Hamilton, and other distinguished characters, with a huge dinner were announced for the occasion.  But ah!  No Hamilton, very little dinner, and not even Pease were there to satisfy their hunger and not a Radical friend would so much as invite the "poor pilgrims," to their homes or tables to partake of their "so called" hospitality and equality.
           
The Index, (which, by the way, is the only sensible thing we have ever seen it do) ignores the whole affair, does not so much as ever refer to, or make mention of it.  Doubtless it is growing wiser, children generally do as they get older.  "When I became a man, I put away childish things."—Harrison Flag. 

HARRISON FLAG [MARSHALL], December 7, 1867, p. 2, c. 2
[Summary:  Argument between Tyler Index and Marshall Harrison Flag

TEXAS REPUBLICAN [MARSHALL], December 7, 1867, p. 1, c. 9
[Summary:  Letter from Secretary of Loyal League at Austin appeared in Galveston News, dated October 1, 1867 from Henry Young to J. B. Vance of Burleson County.  Lists "truly loyal papers of Texas, of which the following is a list given my by the Governor:"  1) Austin Republican, 2) San Antonio Express, 3) McKinney Messenger, 4) Quitman Clipper, 5) Meridian Beacon, 6) Livingston Union Republican, 7) "name unknown, published at Tyler, Smith county." 

WEEKLY AUSTIN REPUBLICAN, December 11, 1867, p. 2, c. 1

Opinion of the Federal Court.

                                                                                    Tyler, Nov. Term, 1867.
Ex Parte
M. C. Moore, charged to have been illegally arrested and imprisoned by Lieut. D. L. Montgomery, at Tyler.
Ex Parte
John T. Kelly, charged to have been wrongfully arrested and imprisoned by Major S. H. Starr, at Mount Pleasant, Titus County.
Ex Parte
Calvin Chancey, alleged to have been illegally arrested by Lieut. Barrett, and held in confinement at Tyler by Lieut. Col. Montgomery.
[Summary:  Above asking for writs of habeas corpus—district judge has no authority because of Reconstruction Act giving power to military.] 

FLAKE'S BULLETIN [GALVESTON], December 17, 1867, p. 2, c. 1
           
It is said that Mr. J. G. Woldart [sic], of Tyler, Texas, will ship this season thirty barrels of wine to New Orleans.  It is said that he receives for it five dollars a gallon.  Some idea of the profit of wine culture may be formed from the experience of the Germans around Cincinnati.  They sell grape juice to the wine manufacturers at from eight cents to one dollar and twenty-five cents per gallon.  From two to five hundred gallons is the usual yield per acre, six and seven hundred gallons are sometimes made, and there are reports of still greater crops. 

DALLAS HERALD, December 29, 1867, p. 2, c. 4
[Summary:  Order for election to determine whether to be a constitutional convention, and what delegates
The county of Smith shall elect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2]