SOCKS, STOCKINGS, AND OTHER KNITTED ITEMS:
Articles from Civil War Newspapers


COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 7

Hosiery!

Ladies' White, Slate and Blue Mixed Cotton Hose; Ladies' Lisle Thread and Lisle Thread Open Work Hose; Children and Misses' Open Work and Striped Hose; Boys and Youths' Hosiery Gents' All Linen Half Hose; Gents' White Lisle Thread, best, &c., &c., at
                                                                                               
Geo. W.  Atkinson & Co's.
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, May 21, 1861, p. 2, c. 2

Soldier's Kit

                At this time, when so many are preparing for the wars, a memorandum of the things necessary to take along as baggage will not be unacceptable.  The desired catalogue is contributed, by an old soldier, as follows:
               
. . . four pair of woolen socks. . .
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, July 12, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
[Letter from "A Daily Purchaser" to the newspaper, Camp McDonald, July 8, 1861, Brig. Genl. Phillips, Col. M. A. Stovall]

               
Our camp is almost always alive with the fair sex--they cheer our lonely hours, and the soldier feels that he has something to fight for at each exhibition of their smiling faces.  Let the girls come and see us and "bring their knitting."
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, July 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 2

To the Ladies of Alabama.

                                                                                                            Executive Department,
                                                                                                           
Montgomery, Ala., July 20.
               
Knowing that the women of Alabama are anxious to do everything in their power for the comfort of the soldiers in the service of the Confederacy, I beg leave to suggest that each one of them knit one pair of substantial woolen socks, and deposit the same with the Judge of the Probate Court of the county in which she resides, who will have them forwarded to the Governor of Alabama, at Montgomery--from whence they will be forwarded free of cost to the soldiers before the cold weather commences.  The Governor deems nothing more necessary, than this suggestion, to secure from the patriotic ladies of the State a sufficient number of socks to protect the feet of our brave soldiers from the frosts of winter.
               
Each of the newspapers in the State are respectfully requested to publish this communication free of charge.                                                                 A. B. Moore.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 9, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
Socks by Machine.--We are informed that Mrs. Douglass has on hand a good lot of socks made of the best material by the celebrated Knitting machine noticed in these columns some months ago.  Let them be bought for the soldiers.  The coarsest are 25 cts. and the finest 37 1/2 cts.--cheaper than socks can be made by hand.--Thomasville Enterprise.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 10, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

Stocking Yarn.

Belleville Factory is manufacturing cotton Stocking Yarn for soldiers' socks, unbleached, bleached or dyed.  Also wrapping twine and sewing thread.  Address
au6tw-tw                                                                                              Gorge Schley, Augusta, Ga.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 21, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
Cotton Socks for the Army.--A local correspondent of the Nashville Union, who says he has worn in Winter for five years, a coarse cotton sock, pronounces it for comfort, warmth and economy unequaled by the "yarn" or the "woolen sock."  He says it is proven by experiment, that the best and cheapest sock for our soldiers is the cotton, provided they are made of coarse, loose yarns, and twisted three ply soft.  The supply of wool is likely to fall short, and if cotton will answer all the purposes of the woolen, we can from the abundance of cotton easily supply our forces.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 21, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
   
            Clothing for the Soldiers.--All who can do so should, at the earliest possible day, make up something like the following, for their friends and relatives, omitting such, of course, as have heretofore been furnished: . . .
               
Two pair of heavy woolen socks.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 25, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
               
The Vicksburg Whig says that nearly every lady, old and young, in Warren county is busily engaged knitting socks for the soldiers--and that the result of their labor will soon be collected together and sent on to the army.  The worthy example should be followed in every county, city and town throughout the South.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, August 28, 1861, p. 1, c. 5

Clothing for the Soldiers.

                All who can do so should, at the earliest possible day, make up something like the following, for their friends and relatives, omitting such, of course, as have heretofore been furnished: . . .
    
           Two pair of heavy woolen socks. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, August 28, 1861, p. 1, c. 7
    
           Cotton Socks for the Army.--A local correspondent of the Nashville Union, who says he has worn in Winter for five years, a coarse cotton sock, pronounces it for comfort, warmth and economy unequaled by the "yarn" or the "woollen sock."  He says it is proven by experiment, that the best, and cheapest sock for our soldiers is the cotton, provided they are made of coarse, loose yarns, and twisted three ply soft.  The supply of wool is likely to fall short, and if cotton will answer all purposes of the woollen, we can from the abundance of cotton easily supply our forces.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, August 28, 1861, p. 2, c. 2

For the Southern Watchman.
To the Little Girls of Georgia.

                I was shown the other day two pairs of good woollen socks, knit by a little girl only eight years of age, (Fannie Bugg, of Oglethorpe co.,) intended for a member of the "Oglethorpe Rifles."  This is a noble example for the little girls of our State.  There are at least thirty thousand of them in Georgia under twelve years of age, who can knit.  Now, let each of them do as Fannie has done, and there will be sixty thousand pairs of good warm socks for our gallant soldiers in the field, produced in this way with little trouble and expense, in a very short time.  Let each little girl get her mother to prepare her some yarn and put her to knitting immediately, and by the 1st of October there will be a bountiful winter supply of socks for all our soldiers, gotten up by *our little girls, * which would be doing a noble part.  I hope to hear of many thousands of Georgia's noble-hearted little girls going into the work, and that none of our soldiers will want socks during the winter.
                                                                                               
Respectfully, yours,
                                                                                                               
M. P. Caldwell. 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, August 31, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
                                                                               
Culverton, Hancock County, Ga.,
                                                                                               
August 24th, 1861.
To the Editor of the Chronicle & Sentinel:

               
. . . The quantity of sewing and knitting which has already been done, is almost incalculable.  Indeed, there has not, since the organization of the Society, been a time when there was no work going on.  The ladies, one and all, irrespective of classes, vie with each other in the making of garments.  The contagion has even caught the little misses at school, and in their leisure moments they are manifesting their patriotism, and contributing their mite in the preparation of socks. . . .  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 3, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
               
Bless the Little Girls.—On Saturday afternoon last, a large number of little girls convened at the residence of Dr. A. M. Parker, on Whitehall street, and formed a knitting club—both for improvement and to furnish the soldiers with good warm woolen socks to keep Jack Frost off their toes.  [Atlanta Confederacy.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, September 19, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
The Franklin (Tenn.) Review says that the young ladies of the Tennessee female college, in that place, knit socks for the soldiers one hour in each day.  This is done at the suggestion of the esteemed President, C. W. Callender, than whom, the Review adds, there is not a more accomplished gentleman and efficient educator in the Southern Confederacy.
 

AUGUSTA [GA] DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL, September 19, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
The Franklin Review states that Mrs. McFadden residing in Williamson county, has knit fifteen pair of socks for our volunteers already, and is still engaged in knitting.  If all of the gentle sex would evince this spirit of practical patriotism, there will be no complaint of our soldiers being badly clothed the coming winter.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 26, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
Stocking Yarn.  We learn from the Augusta Constitutionalist that the Graniteville Factory has commenced the manufacture of cotton yarn for the making of socks and stockings--the machinery for the purpose having been recently imported from England.  The yarn is said, by those who know, to be of the best quality, and it will be sold at reasonable prices.

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 27, 1861, p. 1, c. 3

To the Ladies.

                All in want of yarn to knit socks for our soldiers, can be supplied by calling on
                                                                                               
Jno. S. Coulson. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, October 2, 1861, p. 2, c. 1 (not sure if gloves knitted)
We were shown recently a lot of heavy woollen gloves, comforts, &c. fabricated by Misses Matthews, of Jackson county, for some of our brave volunteers in Virginia.  We had no idea that such articles could be gotten up here in such beautiful style.  They reflect much credit upon the taste, skill and patriotism of the young ladies, and will no doubt contribute much to the comfort of those for whom they were made.
 

DALLAS HERALD, October 2, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Wanted,
100 Pair Socks for the
Soldiers.

                                                                                                                Geo. W. Guess.

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 5, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
                                                                                               
Bastrop, Sept. 27, 1861.
Editor State Gazette:
    
           Sir--At a meeting held by the ladies of Bastrop county, on the 6th of August, they proceeded to organize an "Aid Society," for the benefit of our soldiers, during the war.
    
           The immediate object of the society was to procure thick clothing, blankets, wollen [sic] socks, &c., for Capt. Highsmith's company, which had left this county, to join Parson's regiment.  In the course of two weeks, we obtained a sufficient quantity of clothing to render them comfortable during the winter.
    
           The members of the society are not engaged in spinning yarn, knitting socks, collecting blankets, and making comfortables, to be sent to our soldiers, wherever they may be needed.  Application has been made to the Governor, for material from the Penitentiary, of which, of obtained, we intend to manufacture winter clothing for the destitute, thereby hoping to alleviate to some degree, the hardships incident to a soldier's life.
    
           MISS. L. SCOTT,    }  Corresponding Committee.
    
           MRS. S. J. ORGAIN} 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 8, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
                                                                                                               
Richmond, October 4.
. . . Our young ladies are hard at work with knitting needles.  Visit them when you will, they meet you knitting in hand.  The formation of some of the socks which they have produced does not indicate a very exact knowledge of human anatomy.  I saw one last evening, which, I am told, was intended for the foot of the entire Southern Confederacy.  From its size, I judged it would make rather a loose fit.  Socks are costly luxuries now-a-days.  The coarsest yarn costs two dollars a pound, and a pound of yarn will not quite make five pairs of socks.  The weather is still very warm, but the trees show where the fingers of Jack Frost have pinched 'em.
                                                                                                                               
Hermes.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, October 9, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
               
Soldier's Aid Society.--The following report speaks volumes in favor of the ladies of Clarke county:
               
Quarterly Report of the Soldier's Aid Society of Clarke county.
No. of coats                           301                          Canteen covers                    160
               
pants,                     297                          Comforters                              6
               
shirts,                     794                          Havelocks                              60
               
draws,                    621                          Extra garments,                      65
               
socks,                    348                          Total                                 2,595
    
           The Society takes this opportunity to thank the Ladies of Watkinsville for their cheerful assistance in making the above mentioned articles.
    
           Sept. 30, 1861.                                                                       Susan A. Lipscomb, Sec.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
Knitting Machines.  We this morning saw a New Orleans made knitting machine at work, making stocking legs with great rapidity out of stout worsted yarn.  The machine will knit all kinds of thread, and in that respect is greatly superior to the northern made machines.  It was made by Mr. Spellman, an ingenious mechanic, for some of our patriotic ladies; the castings having been furnished by Messrs. Leeds & Co.  If necessary for knitting of soldier's socks, hundreds of these machines could be furnished and put into operation in a comparatively short space of time.
                                                
New Orleans Delta.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 15, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
               
A Noble Woman.—Mrs. Jane Tunstall, living near Richmond, aided by her two daughters, has made, since the commencement of the war, one hundred and seventy-two soldiers' garments.  She laid aside the scraps left from the "facings," unravelled them, carded and spun the woolen part of the fabric, and has knit three strong and beautiful pairs of socks for the soldiers out of the yarn thus obtained.  Can there be a scarcity of wool for the army with such an example of economy before the country?  Can any nation be subdued who is blessed with such women?—Never.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, October 16 [26], 1861, p. 2, c. 2
               
We are requested by the young ladies and little girls of the Bellville Academy, to return their most cordial and heart-felt thanks to the Mrs. Glenns, Nichols, Johnson, Bell, Hutchens, Peters, Fabin, for having the wool spun for the knitting of socks for the Texas soldiers.  This is quite laudable in the young ladies of our little villa, in employing their idle "play-time," that might otherwise be unprofitable, in working for the comfort of those who are fighting the battles of the Southern Confederacy.—Are there not other schools in this county, and other young ladies that will do likewise?  So far the wants of the soldier have been promptly responded to by the ladies of the county, and they need no coo [sic] through the press to incite them to duty they owe to the soldier. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 24, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Knitting for the Soldiers.

Knitting for the soldiers!
               
How the needles fly!
Now with sound of merriment--
               
Now with many a sigh! 

Knitting for the soldiers!
               
Panoply for feet--
Onward bound to victory?
               
Rushing in retreat? 

Knitting for the soldiers!
               
Wrinkled--aged crone
Flying flying needles
               
By the ember stone. 

Crooning ancient ballads
               
Rocking to and fro,
In your sage divining
               
Say where these shall go! 

Jaunty set of stockings
               
Neat from top to toe,
March they with the victor?
               
Lie with vanquished low? 

Knitting for the soldiers!
               
Matron--merry maid,
Many and many a blessing
               
Many a prayer is said. 

While the glittering needles
               
Fly "around! around!"
Like to Macbeth's witches
               
On enchanted ground. 

Knitting for the soldiers--
               
Still another pair!
And the feet that wear them
               
Speed they onward--where? 

To the silent city
               
On their trackless way?
Homeward--bearing garlands?
               
Who of us shall say? 

Knitting for the soldiers!
               
Heaven bless them all!
Those who win the battle,
               
Those who fighting fall. 

Might our benedictions
               
Speedily win reply,
Early would they crown ye
               
All with victory! 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, November 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3
               
Stockings for the Army.--The following rules are laid down for the direction of ladies wishing to knit socks for the soldiers:  Get large needles and a coarse yarn.  Cast on seventy-eight stitches, and knit the leg ten inches before setting the heel.  The heel should be three and a half inches long, and knit of double yarn, one fine and coarse, for extra strength.  The foot should be eleven or twelve inches long. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, November 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
Stockings for the Army.  The following rules are laid down for the direction of ladies wishing to knit socks for the soldiers:  Get large needles and a coarse yarn.  Cast on seventy-eight stitches and knit the let ten inches before setting the heel.  The heel should be three and a half inches long, and knit of double yarn, one fine and one coarse, for extra strength.  The foot should be eleven or twelve inches long.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUTNRYMAN, November 13, 1861, p. 2, c. 3

Voice from the Bellville School

                The wool kindly provided by the worthy Editor of the Countryman, and spun by a few patriotic ladies of Bellville and vicinity; we, the pupils of the Bellville Academy, (some of us very little girls) have knit into socks for Texas soldiers.  We feel it a privilege thus to be allowed to contribute to the comfort of our brave soldiers, and to them we would say, that so long as is necessary, we pledge ourselves to keep our fingers busy in their behalf:
               
Names                                    No. of fleeces spun.
Mrs. L. A. Johnson......................................2
"    Sarah Glen.............................................1
"    Margaret Glenn.....................................1
"    Amanda Hutchen..................................1
"    Sarah McPeters.....................................1
"    Margaret Fabin......................................1
"    Francis Nichols.....................................1
"    Nancy Granville....................................1
"    Abby Bell..............................................1—10
No. Socks Knit by Young Ladies & Little Girls
               
Names                                    Pairs
Miss Jane Glenn..................................4
"     Cally Glenn...................................2
"     Sallie  Glenn..................................2
"    Virginia Minton..............................2
"     America L. Francis........................4
"     Madora Francis..............................2
"     Victoria C. Howard........................4
"     Laura V. Howard............................1
"     Mary L. Reed..................................4
"     Eliza A. Reed...................................1
"     Carry E. Reed...................................1
"     Mary Matthews................................3
"     Lizzie Matthews...............................1
"     Susan Bell........................................3
"     Angalina Bell...................................2
"     Clarinda Reams................................2
"     Eliza Reams.....................................1
"     Joanna Goode..................................1
"     Melissa Hutchens.............................1
"     Mary McPeters.................................1
"     Caroline Nichols...............................1
"     Ellen Nichols....................................1
"     Laura Railey......................................3
               
_________.................................1—48 

DALLAS HERALD, November 20, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
                                                                                                                  
For the Dallas Herald.

Ladies' Aid Society,

                The Ladies' "Aid Society" of Lancaster, and vicinity have sent forward this day in the care of G. W. O'Connor, H.  C. Thompson; John Wilson, J. H. Moffet, and Thomas Bernard, the following "army supplies," to Col. H. W. Stone's regiment in Missouri: . . .
225 prs heavy yarn socks                                   120 00 . . .
               
It is hoped these articles will reach the army in three weeks, and supply some of the wants of our brave hearted soldiers, and comfort them while toiling for us amid the difficulties of a winter campaign.  May they be as freely received as they are given.
               
The ladies of the Society return their hearty thanks to those who have aided in this noble enterprise.
                                                                                                               
Mrs. Emily Guy, President.
Mrs. Anna Moffett, Secretary,
Lancaster, Nov. 9th, 1861, 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, November 20, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Knitting vs. Novels.

                Twelve months ago, every young lady who had "traveled," whom we saw on the cars, steamboat, stage line, or omnibus, had, as an indispensable article of traveling elegance, one or more yellow-backed novels, or Yankee "Lady's Books."  Now, we see nothing of the kind.
               
The other day we were noticing the nimble fingers of a beautiful young lady in the cars, who industriously added to the length of a white wool sock, all the way from Macon to Atlanta.  At first, we did not recognize her, but finally, with a modest smile she made herself known to us.  She was the daughter of an old friend, and of a highly respected and talented family.  She was a little girl when we last saw her.  She informed us that she had been in Southern Georgia, teaching for two years; that she was now returning to her home to attend her sister's wedding; that her brothers were in the army, and she must send them socks, which was her excuse for shilling away the hours of travel with knitting instead of a novel.
               
Can men who have such sisters be conquered?  Never!  never!!
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, November 21, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
                                                                                                               
Milledgeville, Nov. 14.
. . . [at the Georgia legislature]  To-day the galleries in the House are filled with ladies--the pleasant weather draws them out.  We will just mention, for the benefit of our spicy correspondent "Jennie Freedom," that all belles at the Milledgeville Hotel are minus hoops; and that of evenings, while entertaining their gentlemen acquaintances, they are busily engaged in knitting gloves, comforts, socks, &c., for the soldiers.  This is as it should be. . . .
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNRYMAN, November 27, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
More Socks.—We have received ten pair of yarn socks from Mrs. W. J. M. Lyons, for the benefit of our soldiers at Galveston.  Also, two pair of cotton socks from Mrs. R. Moore, for the same purpose, and take this opportunity to state to those who are knitting for the soldier, that where yarn is not most convenient, cotton will answer the same purpose; as some even prefer the cotton to the yarn sock.  We never use the latter, and doubt not that there are those in the service equally as fastidious as ourself. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 10, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
                                                                                                               
Richmond, December 7.
. . .Richmond ladies are busily engaged in knitting woolen comforts and helmets or vizers for the soldiers. . . .                                                                                                Hermes.    
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Woman's Invention.--The Eutaw (Alabama) Observer states that a lady of that place, being desirous of obtaining a military scarf for a relative, and not being able to buy one to suit her, cut up and carded a silk dress, spun it into thread, and crocheted it into a most beautiful and elegant scarf.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, January 16, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

There's but one Pair of Stockings to
Mend To-night.

An old wife sat by her bright fire-side,
               
Swaying thoughtfully to and fro,
In an ancient chair whose creaky craw
               
Told a tale of long ago;
Wile down by her side on the kitchen floor,
Stood a basket of worsted balls—a score. 

The good man dozed o'er the latest news,
               
Till the light of his pipe went out;
And unheeded, the kitten with cunning paws,
               
Rolled out and tangled the balls about;
Yet still sat the wife in the ancient chair,
Swaying to and fro in the fire-light glare. 

But anon, a misty tear-drop came
               
In her eyes of faded blue,
Then trickled down in a furrow deep,
               
Like a single drop of dew;
So deep was the channel—so silent the stream,
The good man saw naught but the dim'd eyebeam. 

Yet marveled he much that the cheerful light
               
Of her eye, had weary grown,
And marveled he more at the tangled balls—
               
So he said in a gentle tone:
"I have shared thy joys since our marriage vow,
Conceal not from me thy sorrows now." 

Then she spoke of the time when the basket there
               
Was filled to the very brim,
And now there remained of the goodly pile
               
But a single pair—for him;
Then wonder not at the dimmed eye-light;
There's but one pair of stockings to mend to-night. 

I cannot but think of the busy feet,
               
Whose wrappings were wont to lay
In the basket awaiting the needle's tines—
               
Now wandered so far away;
How the sprightly steps to a mother dear
Unheeded fell on the careless ear. 

For each empty nook in the basket old,
               
By the hearth there's an empty seat;
And I miss the shadows from off the wall,
               
And the patter of many feet;
'Tis for this that a tear gathered over my sight;
At the one pair of stockings to mend to-night. 

'Twas said that far through the forest wild
               
And over the mountains bold,
Was a land whose rivers and darkening caves,
               
Were gemmed with the fairest gold;
Then my first-born turned from the oaken door,
And I knew the shadows were only four. 

Another went forth on the foaming wave
               
And diminished the basket's store—
But his feet grew cold—so weary and cold—
               
They'll never be warm any more—
And this nook in its emptiness, seemeth to me,
To give forth no voice but the moan of the sea. 

Two others have gone towards the setting sun,
               
And made them a home in its light,
And fairy fingers have taken their share,

To mend by the fire-side bright;

Some other baskets their garments fill—
But mine!  Oh!  mine is emptier still. 

Another—the dearest—the fairest—the best—
               
Was taken by the angels away,
And clad in a garment that waxeth not old,
               
In a land of a continual day.
O!  wonder no more at the dimmed eye-light,
While I mend the one pair of stockings to-night.
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, March 6, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

Country Brown Jeans Wanted.

                I wish to purchase for the "Confederate Continentals," 500 yards best brown Jeans, delivered immediately at my store; also, for same, 500 yards Georgia Plains and 100 pair cotton and woolen Socks.
mar6-2t                                                                                                   A. K. Seago. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 22, 1862, p. 3, c. 6
               
The course of the Athens, Macon and Augusta factories in fixing the price of their cotton goods at moderate rates, has met with universal commendation.  Mr. McCullough, near Gladden's Grove, Fairfield District, S. C., is manufacturing and selling cotton yarn at $1 a bunch.  This is a fair, even a liberal price, for the consumer to pay, considering the price which he has to take for his cotton.—Charleston Courier.
               
Would it not be well for the Georgia factories to imitate the patriotic course of Mr. McCullough.  Our soldiers need socks.  Our wives and daughters are willing to knit them.  The factories throughout the country should, in a corresponding spirit of liberality, aid this good work.
               
There is much deep and smothered indignation all over the land against the greedy extortioner.  Let the Courts and Grand Juries make diligent inquiry in regard to the matter, and bring guilty parties under inflections of the penal code, or the people, it is believed, will take the remedy into their own hands and commit acts of vengeance, which every good citizen should discourage and deplore.  The extortioners may be sure of one thing, that our soldiers will not be permitted to fight their battles with bare backs and empty stomachs whilst there are goods and provisions in the country.—Macon Mess.
 

CHICAGO TIMES, June 25, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
The act of knitting has hitherto been esteemed merely industrial; but, by a verse in a most stirring war song, we see that it is now numbered among woman's more poetical doings.  Thus stands the knitting needle in immortal company:
    
                                           "Soldiers brave, will it brighten the day,
     
                                          And shorten the march on the weary way,
      
                                          To know that at home the loving and true
                                               
Are knitting, and hoping, and praying for you?"               

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Knit Jackets.
50 Jackets,

Suitable for Soldiers.   For sale by
                                                                                                      
Holcomb, Cope & Co.
               

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, August 6, 1862, p. 4, c. 7

Wanted!

5000 pair woolen and cotton socks;
500 bushels dried apples and peaches;
1000 yards country Cotton Cloths, plain, striped and checked;
1000 yards Woolen Linsey for Overshirts;
500 yards        "       Jeans for Coats and Pants for all which the best market price will be paid in cash.
July 16.                                                                   I. M. Kenney.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, August 23, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Stockings for the Army.
The Ladies Only Rest for Lack of Yarn.

                There is an old adage, which has run through ages, that "In time of peace we should prepare for war."  In these days of war, desecration and bloodshed by the meanest of enemies, the noble women of our own Sunny South--the land of fair savannahs and crystal lakes--of the palmetto and magnolia--have rendered this adage in a different form:  they now have it "In summer prepare for winter"--and gloriously have they so far responded to the maxim.
    
           We are happy to learn that both in city and country, the lady friends of the soldier have been making preparations for their comfort in the winter.  Our own volunteer companies, we understand, have been nearly or quite supplied, but there remain several weeks yet in which to push forward the good work of knitting stockings for the army.  In one locality of Adams county, we have already heard of one hundred extra pair of army socks; and there are doubtless many more accumulating in other portions of the county.  In the city, many good knitters are idle for the want of yarn.  Cannot they be supplied.  Let us remember that time now is precious, and that the soldier must be warmly clad as he advances on the enemy's country next month. ...
    
           To concentrate our energies, and to further to object contemplated, we are requested to state that Mr. R. M. Spurgeon, of the Courier Office will receive all stockings or socks that are now ready, and pack and direct them to the points desired.  He will further take charge of any yarn that may be appropriated for the good purpose, and use his best endeavors to have it distributed where it will be promptly knit into socks.
    
           Let us at once put forth our best efforts for this most essential branch of the Home Service.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, August 28, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Another Call.

                Colonel Johnson, of General Price's staff, has issued the following call:

To the People of Mississippi.

                Quitman, Miss., Aug. 6.  I am in your midst for the purpose of procuring shoes and yarn socks for General Price's army.  Some of his veterans--men who have been in six or eight pitched battles and twenty skirmishes--are to-day destitute of these two articles, necessary even in camp, but indispensable when the army takes the field. ... Gen. Price desires that the patriotic men of this State should furnish the shoes, and her glorious women the yarn socks.  If possible, he would like every white woman in the State to knit at least one pair of socks for his army.  While I make this appeal, I think it is proper to add, that I do ask a donation but am prepared to pay a liberal price for both shoes and yarn socks.  I shall be pleased to contract with tanners and shoe manufacturers for shoes now on hand, or to be made hereafter; and will be obliged to any person who will let me know where I can make contacts. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Knitting for the Soldiers.--This is an important matter, and one which we hope will engage the early and earnest attention of all the women of the country who have it in their power to aid in providing for the wants of our brave soldiers.  The season for cold weather is rapidly approaching.  In a very few weeks our soldiers will require their supplies of winter clothing.  Among the articles they will need, and which should be furnished them with as little delay as possible, are good, warm, comfortable socks.  The pittance which the soldiers receive from the Government for clothing, is not enough to supply them with outer clothing alone; and hence many are unable to pay for the under clothing which their necessities compel them to have.  Last year at this time, there were thousands of fair fingers busily employed in knitting for the soldiers, and, thanks to the untiring efforts of the noble hearted women of the South, the defenders of the country were as comfortably clad during the last winter, as could have been expected.  Next winter there will be more than double the number of soldiers in the field that there was last, and renewed and redoubled exertions will be necessary in order to prevent suffering in their ranks from the want of sufficient clothing.  It is the duty of those who remain at home to provide for those in the field, and we feel assured that those who have fathers, husbands, sons, brothers and friends in the army, will not fail to do all that love, patriotism and duty require.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], September 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Something for the Ladies.

                We understand the ladies in the vicinity of Brook's Chapel, have had a meeting for the purpose of contributing to the wants of Price's men, and have gone to work with the spinning wheel and needle, in order to have as many socks ready as possible to be sent to them before leaving this section.  Each one, from eight years up, is determined to knit one pair at least--and they will do what they have promised.  This is a movement in the right direction and is another example as well of the patriotism as [well?] as of the unconquerable spirit of our mothers and daughters.  We notice the circumstance not particularly to illustrate their known patriotism but that other neighborhoods may have notice and that there may be a concert of action on the part of others who are desirous of doing likewise.  Some ladies who cannot get wool are making them of cotton--others of cotton and wool in equal proportions, and those who have the material altogether of wool. 
  
             One young lady, just from school, was asked if she would knit one pair, who promptly replied, "yes, and five others."  The questioner thought prudent to propound no more in that shape.  A call for one pair seemed to her to imply a want of the true grit and hence somewhat of indignation in her reply.  We are authorised to say that Dr. Wilbourne, an old citizen of the county, will receive the socks when ready, and deliver them to Gen. Price.
    
           For socks, all yarn, white or colored, of good size and length in the leg and foot, I will pay seventy-five cents per pair.  They may be sent to me or to Dr. France at this place, where they will be paid for, or may be left with the station agent of the nearest depot of any of the three railroads now in our possession, and sometime soon I will call or send an agent to get them and pay for them.
                                               
Thomas C. Johnson.
                                                                                                                      
Aide to Gen. Price.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Wool for Socks.

                Persons having wool, which they desire spun into yarn, to be appropriated for soldiers' socks, can have the same attended to by leaving it at the counting-room of the Daily Courier office. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Clothe the Soldiers.

                Governor Shorter, of Alabama, has addressed a stirring appeal to the ladies of that State, calling for assistance for the soldier.  He says that the government will not be able to supply socks for the whole army, and reminds them of the importance of clothing to the soldier during the ensuing winter.  Those who cannot afford to furnish such articles of clothing gratuitously, will be paid at the rate of fifty cents a pair for heavy cotton, and seventy-five cents for good woolen socks.  The aid societies and judges of the probate courts throughout the State will act as receiving agents, and forward at the expense of the State to the quartermaster at Mobile, or to the assistant quartermaster at Montgomery.
                                                                                                               
Memphis Appeal.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

 To the People of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Composed of
the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.

                At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged, has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous cooperation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Mississippi River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for the wants of our army, to seek for and develop new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invades of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
    
           In this emergency, Maj-Gen'l T. H. Holmes, commanding in this Department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which, if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material at its command will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving, may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes; while those who have looms adapted to the purpose, can furnish blankets, or some other article answering the same object.
    
           The clerk of each county in the States named is required, either to take charge of, or appoint some suitable person to receive and forward all goods manufactured for army purposes, in the county in which he resides, to the nearest Post Quartermaster of the Confederate States Army, who will be furnished with funds to pay for the same on delivery, with cost of transportation added.  For his services, the agent who may attend to the collection and forwarding of these goods, will be allowed a reasonable compensation by the Post Quartermaster to whom he delivers them.  No limit will be placed on the prices of the articles thus furnished--the General commanding having confidence that a patriotic people will not extort upon their government in its hour of need.  The Post Quartermasters who receive the supplies in the way indicated, are requested to forward them to these headquarters without delay, and, as far as possible, to keep this office advised of the amount of clothing being made in their vicinity for the army.
    
           Merchants in these States who have for sale clothing suitable for army purposes, are requested to furnish immediately, to the nearest Post Quartermaster, a memorandum invoice of the articles, with prices annexed, to assist him in making purchases for the Quartermaster's Department.  Authorized purchasing agents are also abroad in various localities, and it is expected that the people will aid them in their efforts to procure supplies, by advising them as to the places where stored.
    
           The Major General commanding does not deem it necessary to do more than inform the people of this Department regarding the necessities of the troops under his command, and suggest a plan by which they can be promptly and comfortably clad.  He feels assured that this appeal will suffice to put in operation every spinning wheel and loom throughout the limits of the Department, and that neighbor will vie with neighbor, and community with community, in praiseworthy efforts to furnish clothing for the army.
                                                                                                                        
JNO. D. Adams,
 
                                                                                           Capt. and Acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                                                                                               
Trans Mississippi District,
Papers throughout the country will please copy, and call public attention to this appeal.
                                                                                                               
[True Democrat, Ark.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
To Crochet Workers.  One of the most acceptable presents a young lady can forward to her "jularkie" in the army, is a woolen helmet, made to draw over the head, down as far as the breast, leaving an aperture of about five inches, so that the eyes, nose and mouth may be uncovered.  Upon a bitter cold night, when the soldier is on guard, as he draws his helmet over his head he will thank his lady-love for her acceptable present, and bless her for thinking so kindly of him.  It protects the head and throat admirably, and almost secures complete exemption from bronchial affections.  Those soldiers who own them, value them very highly.                                      [Claiborne County Dispatch. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Sock Manufactory.—An enterprizing firm in Wilmington, N. C., has a factory in operation in that city that turns out daily 1000 pairs of thick strong and soft socks, suitable for soldiers' wear, which are supplied to North Carolina troops.  The same firm, we see, are endeavoring to establish a branch of their business at Montgomery, Ala., for furnishing the troops of that State in like manner.  It would be a great blessing to the army could a similar factory be located on a large Scale in every Confederate State.
               
These and clothing establishments, and tan yards, and shoe shops, are eminently worthy of the attention of capitalists of liberal, patriotic spirit, as contra-distinguished from those public scourges—those sons of Balial, those worse than Pagans—those infinitely degraded creatures who, human in form, wage war against humanity itself, and put the religion of the Gospel, which many of them profess, and the church of Christ, of which many of them are members, to open shame, by their insatiate race for lucre, and their heartless exactions.  We mean, of course, the Extortioners.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 1, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
Knitting for the Soldiers.--This is an important matter, says the Charleston Mercury, and one which we hope will engage the early and earnest attention of all the women of the country who have it in their power to aid in providing for the wants of our brave soldiers.  The season for cold weather is rapidly approaching.  In a very few weeks our soldiers will require their supplies of winter clothing.  Among the articles they will need, and which should be furnished them with as little delay as possible, are good, warm, comfortable socks.  The pittance which the soldiers received from the government for clothing, is not enough to supply them with outer clothing along; and hence many are unable to pay for their under clothing, which their necessities compel them to have.  Last year at this time, there were thousands of fair fingers busily employed in knitting for the soldiers, and thanks to the untiring efforts of the noble hearted women of the South, the defenders of the country were as comfortably clad during the last winter, as could have been expected.  Next winter, there will be more than double the number of soldiers in the field that were last, and renewed and redoubled exertions will be necessary in order to prevent suffering in their ranks from the want of sufficient clothing.  It is the duty of those who remain at home to provide for those [illegible], and we feel assured that those who have fathers, husbands, sons, brothers, and friends in the army, will not fail to do all that love, patriotism and duty require.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], October 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

To the Ladies of Mississippi and Alabama.

                Two months ago, a call was made upon the ladies of Mississippi to furnish socks for General Price's army.  The gentleman who made the call, is informed that the ladies of Mississippi are doing all they can to answer it.  Finding it impossible in many sections of the State to get wool, they are doing the next best thing--knitting cotton socks, which will be highly acceptable to our brave men.  Each soldier ought to have at least two pairs of socks.  As the manufacture of so many pairs (which ought to be done in a short time) may entail a heavy burden upon one State, it has been determined to appeal to the ladies of Alabama to aid in the work, more especially since Alabamians now compose a part of the army of the Tennessee.  If each lady of these two States will furnish one pair of socks, it will give the army more than an abundant supply.  These articles are for the use of the whole command, without distinction, and no lady knows but what the very pair she knits may be distributed to some noble fellow who is near and dear to her by the ties of blood or affection.  The socks, whether of yarn or cotton, should be thick and of good length in the leg and foot.  Hundreds of ladies will donate these articles, but there are many who cannot and ought not to give them.  To such seventy-five cents will be paid for yarn, and fifty cents for cotton socks, by Major Brinker, at Tupelo.
    
           Many packages can be sent up by private hands, but to facilitate matters, the Southern Express and the Pioneer Express companies have generously offered to transport to Tupelo free of charge all packages of socks intended for the army, if deposited at any of the stations on the several railroads of these two States; and in cases where any of the socks are charged for, they will collect the bills and hand the money to the agent at the station where they were received.  It is recommended that parties getting up a package should appoint a suitable person to see that it gets into the hands of the Express company.  All packages should be directed to Major Isaac Brinker, Post Quartermaster, Tupelo, and superscribed "Socks for the Army."
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 3, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

To the Ladies of Mississippi and Alabama.

                Two months ago a call was made upon the ladies of Mississippi to furnish socks for Gen. Price's army.  The gentleman who made the call, is informed that the ladies of Mississippi are doing all they can to answer it.  Finding it impossible in many sections of the State to get wool, they are doing the next best thing--knitting cotton socks, which will be highly acceptable to our brave men.  Each soldier ought to have at least two pairs of socks.  As the manufacture of so many pairs (which ought to be done in a short time) may entail too heavy a burden upon one State, it has been determined to appeal to the ladies of Alabama to aid in the work, more especially since the Alabamians now compose a part of the army of the Tennessee.  If each lady of these two States will furnish one pair of socks, it will give the army more than an abundant supply.   These articles are for the use of the whole command without distinction, and no lady knows but what the very pair she knits, may be distributed to some noble fellow who is near and dear to her by the ties of blood or affection.  The socks, whether of yarn or cotton, should be thick and of good length in the leg and foot.  Hundreds of ladies will donate these articles, but there are many who cannot and ought not to give them.  To such, seventy-five cents will be paid for yarn, and fifty cents for cotton socks, by Major Brinker, at Tupelo. ... 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 7, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Clothing the Army.

. . . There is a corresponding obligation on the part of the citizen to do a part toward the relief of the army, and that part is the full measure of his ability, even should it be attended with self sacrifice and reduce the number of comforts around him.  In his quiet and peaceful home he should think of the poor soldier while braving the storms and plodding over the snow-clad mountains of Virginia to defend us from the grasp of the oppressor.  It is no time for selfishness.  Every man that has a blanket should send it to the soldiers.  In this genial climate we can readily save ourselves from suffering with cotton comforts and other means of command.  Every man who has a wool mattress should spare it to the government, and resort to cotton and moss, which are abundant.  There are thousands of light half-worn carpets that might be cut into blankets 6 ½ feet by 5, and sent to the army.  And then, again, insignificant as it may appear, there is an abundance of warm winter clothing, already made up, stored away in our closets and wardrobes, very much of which could be spared without any serious inconvenience to the owner.  Let all these things be brought forward from their hiding places and forwarded to some convenient point to be shipped forthwith to the army.  Coarse cotton socks are also in great demand, and the women of Georgia, by an effort, could supply every soldier from the State with two or three pairs before the close of the year. . .  

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 16, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Wanted--Wool for Army Socks.

                A friend informs us, that he has cards and a spinning-wheel for yarn, and that he will cheerfully undertake the making of a few more pairs of socks, if any one will furnish the wool at the Courier Office counting-room.  Who will bring forward the one article needful? 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], October 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
    
           Sock Manufactory--An enterprising firm in Wilmington, North Carolina, has a factory in operation in that city that turns out daily one thousand pairs of thick, strong and soft socks, suitable for soldiers' wear, which are supplied to the North Carolina troops.  The same firm it is said, are endeavoring to establish a branch of their business at Montgomery, Alabama, for furnishing the troops of that State in like manner.  It would be a great blessing to the army were a similar factory located on a large scale in every Confederate State.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Sock Manufactory.—An enterprising firm in Wilmington, N. C., has a factory in operation in that city that turns out daily 1000 pairs of thick, strong and soft socks, suitable for soldiers' wear, which are supplied to the North Carolina troops.  The same firm, it is said, are endeavoring to establish a branch of their business at Montgomery, Alabama, for furnishing the troops of that State in like manner.  It would be a great blessing to the army were a similar factory located on a large scale in every Confederate State.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
[list of sock contributors, with how many pair supplied--total 746 pair]
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 2-3

Practical Hints for Hard Times
"What man has done, man may do."
NO. 1 – SHOES.

. . .           9.  KNITTED SHOES AND BOOTS.—Persons skilled in crochet work can produce a fabric which is as thick, as tough and as inelastic as leather.  It has been proposed to make shoes on this plan and to render them fit for out door use by giving them a sole, and by saturating the uppers with water proof or enamel. . . . 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Gloves for the Soldiers.—These articles of comfort, we fear, will be overlooked.  They are almost as indispensable as socks in a cold climate, yet few seem to think of the necessity of supplying them.  As almost every little girl in the South can knit a pair of gloves, we would earnestly call the attention of the ladies to that particular article of soldiers' wear.  Make them of wool, and the thicker the better.
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, November 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
How to Knit a Worsted Cap for the Soldiers.--Put on 150 stitches, and knit, ribbed, one finger and a quarter's length.--Take off, for the head piece eighty-one stitches and knit a finger's length, as you would the heel of a stocking; then take off thirty-three stitches, and knit nearly a finger's length, narrowing each side until all the stitches are taken off.  Then take up the stitches as you would the foot of a sock, and knit as on a sock until you have one hundred and twenty six stitches left on the needles.  After narrowing, knit a few rows round, and bind off.
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, November 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Appeal on Behalf of the Soldiers.

                Gov. Vance, of North Carolina, has issued the following address to the people of that State.  Its patriotism will apply in every quarter of the Confederacy.  He says:
               
After the most strenuous exertions on the part of its officers, the State finds it impossible to clothe and shoe our soldiers without again appealing to that overflowing fountain of generous charity--the private contributions of our people.  The rigors of winter are approaching, our soldiers are already suffering, and must suffer more if our sympathies are not practical and active.  The quartermasters Department is laboring faithfully to provide for them, but, owing to speculation and extortion, will fall short.  The deficiency must be supplied by the people.  We shall have an active winter campaign, and how can our troops, if ragged, cold, and barefoot, contend with the splendidly equipped columns of the enemy?
               
The articles most needed, and which the State finds it most difficult to supply, are shoes, socks and blankets, though drawers, shirts and pants would be gladly received.  If every farmer who has hides tanning would agree to spare one pair of shoes, and if every mother in North Carolina would knit one strong pair of either thick cotton or woolen socks for the army, they would be abundantly supplied.  A great lot of blankets, also, might yet be spared from private use, and thousands could be made from the carpets upon our parlor floors.  With good, warm houses and cotton bed clothing, we can certainly get through the winter much better than the soldiers can with all the blankets we can give them. . . .
                                                                                                                               
Z. B. Vance.
               
Raleigh, October 15, 1862.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, November 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Socks for the Army.

Capt. Horne, of the 3d Kentucky Regiment, is here, just from Holly Springs, for the purpose of getting socks for his company.  They are entirely destitute of socks, having lost all their camp equipage and clothing in their retreat from Corinth.  He says this was general, and the Government has not enough for that whole army, and consequently he wishes to get them in the vicinity of Natchez.  He will be here until the 17th inst., and any person wishing to contribute as above, will leave them at the Provost Marshal's office.  If more than enough for the Captain's company are deposited, he would be glad to take them to the balance of the regiment. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Practical Hints for the Times.
"What man has done, man can do."
No. III—CLOTHING.

. . . 2.  Knitted Garments.--The crochet—or hooked—needle gives such rapid results that it is surprising we do not see more of its products in common use.  For coarse work, its advantage over the common knitting needle is as ten to one.  In the articles of male attire—the ladies will pardon my non intrusion into the secret domain of the toilet and bureau—the crochet needle would be found superlatively useful in furnishing the country with gloves, socks and stockings—with the heel and toe knitted in the ordinary way, to avoid the rough knots—cravats, scarfs for the ears and neck, undershirts, drawers, and what would be as exceedingly great comfort to our soldiers on night duty a helmet of woolen yarn, made to protect the head, ears, chin and neck, and worn under the military cap.
                3.  Winter Yarns.--The scarcity of wool compels us to look around for substitutes.  The warmest pair of gloves ever worn by the writer was made of rabbit fur, carded and spun with cotton.  The negro clothes manufactured by our Yankee friends, in former years, were more or less intermixed with cow hair.  The idea may be useful.
               
If all the scraps of tattered blankets and worn out carpets that are now left to decay, on every square mile of these Confederate States—to say nothing of the wool locked up in mattresses—were picked to pieces, and carded with cotton, they would probably suffice to furnish more than half the socks now needed by our soldiers.  True, the staple will be found short and crisp, and probably the barbs of the wool would be worn smooth, but these defects will be met and remedied, in part, by mixing the wool with cotton. . . . 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
How to Knit a Worsted Cap for the Soldiers.—Put on 150 stitches, and knit, ribbed, one finger and a quarter's length.  Take off, for the head-piece, eighty-one stitches, and knit a finger's length, as you would the heel of a stocking; then take off thirty three stitches, and knit nearly a finger's length, narrowing each side until all the stitches are taken off.  Then take up the stitches as you would the foot of a sock, and knit as on a sock until you have one hundred and twenty-six stitches left on the needles.  After narrowing, knit a few rows round, and bind off. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
We call special attention to the advertisement for "Socks for our Soldiers," by Capt. Wharton, of the Quartermaster Department.  This is a subject that should interest the ladies of the country.  They can serve the country and themselves too, if they choose to exercise a talent that most all ladies are familiar with.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
                                                                                               
Holly Springs, Friday, Oct. 31.
               
The noble women of Mississippi have again elated the hearts of our brave and suffering troops by a timely and welcome contribution of 1,400 pairs of socks, which are now being distributed to poor fellows nearly—some entirely—bare-footed.
               
Could the generous ladies of Natchez and of Columbus but witness the distribution of their donations and know how they are ameliorating the sufferings of the soldiers; could they see the joy that lights up, like a soft sunbeam, the countenances of the brave fellows at the receipt of such welcome testimonials of remembrance from fair and gentle hands; could they but hear their grateful thanks and praises, how fully would they feel repaid for the noble work they have so generously undertaken.  Could they see, as they might frequently, stalwart, noble specimens of manly nature melted almost to tears by the receipt of such presents, sometimes by chance accompanied by names dearly cherished of old, and now recalled by a like name inscribed in neat chirography, recalling scenes of home and its loved ones; could they know and feel all this, these fair ladies would feel thankful indeed that they were able to impart such happiness to their patriotic and suffering defenders.
               
A little note accompanying such tokens of careful remembrance, having written in it, in neat characters, "Mary," "Nannie, "Hattie," or whatever the name of the generous donor may be, together with a cheering word, often softens a heart and melts a nature hardened and apparently implacable, awakening feelings of tenderness which long have slumbered and almost become forgotten.  More especially does this apply to Kentuckians, Tennesseans, and Missourians, brave and noble men, who, when their own homes were wrested from them by the tyrant's mandate, have locked arms with their brothers who are in like danger, forsaking their homes, their joys, everything but liberty, spilling out their hearts blood, a consecrated communion, as free as water, upon fields rendered immortal by their valor and prowess.  To these men of dauntless daring, who are far away from their homes and their loved ones, and the hands of whose fair women, tied and trammelled by the despot's chains, are unable to contribute to their comfort, how pleasant is the though that we are a national and sympathetic brotherhood and sisterhood, as evinced in the kind care of the ladies of the South, noble, self-sacrificing women, whose shibboleth is universal goodness.
               
I have before me a little note which accompanied a pair of socks from Natchez, which fortunately fell into the possession of Captain MacLean, of Gen. Price's staff.  In the neatest imaginable chirography is inscribed:  "For the Giant of the West, from Sallie—kill a Yankee for me!"  Whoever patriotic Sallie intended the present for, it certainly fell into the hands of one of the "giants of the West," in the person of dauntless "Mac."  Indeed, they could scarcely have failed to have done so had they been allotted to either Gen. Price or his staff, who have won the title of "giants in person and giants in fight."  The old "Tycoon" himself is over six feet two inches in height, and his weight does not fall much below 200, and in both of these respects, he is equaled by Col. Taylor, and Capts. Loughborough, Maclean and Gains, of his staff.
               
Though the socks donated by the ladies of Natchez and Columbus have gone far towards making comfortable a portion of the Missourians, Arkansians, Texans, Mississippians, and Alabamians of Gen. Price's command, they are but as a drop in the bucket.  Let the ladies of the latter States continue to exert themselves still further for the comfort of the brave and gallant defenders of their homes and honor—each one at least contributing a pair of socks and forming together a working and contribution society, whose every member will be thanked and blessed by those brave men around whose troubles and trials you will be throwing a softening guise and holy influence, worthy of as great consideration as their personal comfort.  Many generous women find themselves thanked by letter from those soldiers who they have aided; and no doubt could all our soldiers learn the names of their considerate benefactors, as many as could find the writing materials would do likewise.  In the name, then, of those of our troops who are unable so to do, and in the name of the gallant and beloved General who leads them forth to battle, to whose Sterling patriotism they bow, and under whom they go forth to battle regardless of the Price of victory in bloodshed and suffering, thanks are hereby returned collectively to the generous ladies of Mississippi. . . .
                                                                                                               
N'Importe. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, November 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
How to knit a worsted cap for the soldiers.--Put on 150 stitches, and knit, ribbed, one finger and a quarter's length.  Take off for the head-piece, eighty-one stitches, and knit a finger's length, as you would the heel of a stocking; then take off thirty-three stitches, and knit nearly a finger's length, narrowing each side until all the stitches are taken off.  Then take up the stitches as you would the foot of a sock, and knit as on a sock until you have one hundred and twenty-six stitches left on the needles.  After narrowing, knit a few rows round, and bind off. 

SAN ANTONIO HERALD, November 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
A valuable donation of 100 pounds of wool to the Ladies Southern Aid Society of San Antonio, by Mr. Caldwell, and 40 pounds by Mrs. Cline, will give the members an opportunity of knitting socks for the soldiers; a number of the members have offered their services to do so.
               
Any lady who has it in her power to prepare the wool for knitting, will confer a great favor by reporting it to the President, Vice President, or Treasurer.
               
A list of articles sent by the Society to the destitute of Gen. McCulloch's command in Arkansas will be given next week. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, November 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Army Correspondence.
From the Mobile News.

Holly Springs, Oct. 31.  The noble women of Mississippi have again elated the hearts of our brave and suffering troops by a timely and welcome contribution of 1,400 pairs of socks, which are now being distributed to poor fellows nearly--some entirely--barefooted.
    
           Could the generous ladies of Natchez and of Columbus but witness the distribution of their donations and know how they are ameliorating the sufferings of the soldiers; could they seen the joy that lights up, like a soft sunbeam, the countenances of the brave fellows at the receipt of such welcome testimonials of remembrance from fair and gentle hands; could they but hear their grateful thanks and praises, how fully would they feel repaid for the noble work they have so generously undertaken.  Could they see, as they might frequently, stalwart, noble specimens of manly nature melted almost to tears by the receipt of such presents, sometimes by chance accompanied by names dearly cherished of old, and now recalled by a like name inscribed in neat chirography, recalling scenes of home and its loved ones; could they know and feel all this, these fair ladies would feel thankful indeed that they were able to impart such happiness to their patriotic and suffering defenders.
    
           A little note accompanying such tokens of careful remembrance, having written in it, in neat characters, "Mary," "Nannie," "Hattie," or whatever the name of the generous donor may be, together with a cheering word, often softens a heart and melts a nature hardened and apparently implacable, awakening feelings of tenderness which long have slumbered and almost become forgotten.  More especially does this apply to Kentuckians, Tennesseans, and Missourians, brave and noble men, who, when their own homes were wrested from them by the tyrant's mandate, have locked arms with their brothers who are in like danger, forsaking their homes, their joys, everything but liberty, spilling out their hearts' blood, a consecrated communion, as free as water, upon fields rendered immortal by their valor and prowess.  To these men of dauntless daring, who are far away from their homes and their loved ones, and the hands of whose fair women, tied and trammeled by the despot's chains, are unable to contribute to their comfort, how pleasant is the thought that we are a national and sympathetic brotherhood and sisterhood, as evinced in the kind care of the ladies of the South, noble, self-sacrificing women, whose shibboleth is universal goodness.
    
           I have before me a little note which accompanied a pair of socks from Natchez, which fortunately fell into the possession of Capt. MacLean, of Gen. Price's staff.  In the neatest imaginable chirography is inscribed:  "For the Giant of the West, From Sallie--kill a Yankee for me!"  Whoever patriotic Sallie intended the present for, it certainly fell into the hands of one of the "giants of the West," in the person of dauntless "Mac."  Indeed, they could scarcely have failed to have done so had they been allotted to either General Price or his staff, who have won the title of "giants in person and giants in fight."  The old "Tycoon" himself is over six feet two inches in height, and his weight does not fall much below 200, and in both of these respects he is equaled by Col. Taylor and Capts. Loughborough, MacLean and Gains, of his staff.
    
           Though the socks donated by the ladies of Natchez and Columbus have gone far towards making comfortable a portion of the Missourians, Arkansians, Texans, Mississippians and Alabamians of Gen. Price's command, they are but as a drop in the bucket.  Let the ladies of the latter States continue to exert themselves still further for the comfort of the brave and gallant defenders of their homes and honor--each one at least contributing a pair of socks and forming together a working and contribution society, where every member will be thanked and blessed by those brave men around whose troubles and trials you will be throwing a softening guise and holy influence, worthy of as great consideration as their personal comfort.  Many generous women find themselves thanked by letter from those soldiers who they have aided; and no doubt could all our soldiers learn the names of their considerate benefactors, as many as could find writing material would do likewise.  In the name, then, of those of our troops who are unable to do so, and in the name of the gallant and beloved General who leads them forth to battle, to whose Sterling patriotism they bow, and under whom they go forth to battle regardless of the Price of victory in bloodshed and suffering, thanks are hereby returned collectively to the generous ladies of Mississippi. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Important to Soldiers' Aid Societies.--The following notice, from the Quartermaster General's Department, is published in the Richmond papers:
               
It is announced for the information of all concerned, that the Quartermaster's Department will pay for shoes, blankets and other articles of clothing, which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States of the Confederacy, to their soldiers in the field, at the prices stated in the following table; provided, that such articles are supplied under the direction of the County Courts or other county tribunals: . . .
Woolen Socks...                                   1.00 . . .
               
Payment will be made upon delivery at the nearest Quartermaster's Post on the line of railroad transportation, and the articles will be sent or issued to the Chief Quartermaster of the nearest military department, by whom they will be issued, so far as may be needed, to the particular troops for whom they were intended.  In all cases, however, where such troops shall be already supplied, the articles will be issued to others who may require them.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, December 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                               
Paulding, Miss., Sunday, Nov. 30, 1862.
. . . . P.S.—Allow me to suggest to those who are calling on the country women for socks, clothing, &c., for the army, to at least furnish them with cards.  We know several ladies who would gladly furnish the material, board themselves, and work for nothing, if they could get the cards for a reasonable price.  We think that the Government could do it if it wants us to clothe the soldiers.  What has become of our Selma Card Manufacturer?                                                                      Susan,
                                                                                      
And many other Ladies in East Mississippi. 

DALLAS HERALD, December 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
We have been shown a donation of 31 pairs worsted socks, 50 flannel overshirts, 2 undershirts, and 6 pair flannel drawers, for the soldiers, made by a lady and her two daughters, in Grimes county.  The flannel was all of home manufacture, and the best article of the kind we have seen in many a long day.  This donation is worth at least $75, probably $100.—Telegraph.
               
According to our calculations, the above articles would bring not less than $450. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Soldiers' Clothing.

                The Richmond papers publish an important announcement from the Quartermaster General's Office, dated Richmond, Nov. 28th.  It gives notice that that Department will pay for shoes, blankets, and other articles of clothing which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States to their soldiers in the field, provided that such articles are supplied under the direction of the county authorities—and offers the following prices therefore:  Caps $2, Jackets $12, Pants $9, Flannel Shirts $8, Cotton Shirts $1, Striped Cotton Shirts $1.50, Drawers $1, Shoes $6, Woolen Socks $1, Overcoats with capes $25, Blankets per pair $15.
               
The articles so furnished will be issued, as far as needed, to the particular troops for whom they are intended—but if they are already supplied, to others.  Payments will be made on delivery at the nearest Quartermaster's post.
 

WASHINGTON [ARK] TELEGRAPH, December 10, 1862
Our soldiers are nearly destitute of woolen socks.   Will not the ladies make an effort for their relief?  A supply of knitting yarn always on hand at the Quartermaster's office in this place.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON], December 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
Important to Soldiers' Aid Societies.  The following notice, from the quartermaster-general's department, is published in the Richmond papers:
    
           It is announced, for the information of all concerned, that the quartermaster's department will pay for shoes, blanket and other articles of clothing, which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States of the Confederacy, to their soldiers in the field, at the prices stated in the following table, provided, that such articles are supplied under the direction of the county courts or other county tribunals: . . .
Woolen socks................     $1 . . .
    
           Payment will be made upon delivery at the nearest quartermaster's post on the line of railroad transportation, and the articles will be sent or issued to the chief quartermaster of
the nearest military department, by whom they will be issued, so far as may be needed, to the particular troops for whom they were intended.  In all cases, however, where such troops shall be already supplied, the articles will be issued to others who may require them. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, December 17, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
    
To knit heels to socks double, so that they may thus last twice as long as otherwise, skip every alternate stitch on the wrong side, and kit [knit?] all in the right.  This will make it double, like that of a double ply ingrain carpet. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, December 24, 1862, p.  3, socks appeal 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
We have been shown at Morse's drug store ten pair excellent woolen socks knit by the hands of Mrs. Rawley, for the soldiers of Capt. Martin's company--also a large and beautiful bed spread of cotton yarn knitted with two needles, all the handiwork of Mrs. R.  With such ladies in our midst our soldiers need not want for clothing to keep out the chilly blasts of winter while fighting their country's battles; and we trust all who can will follow the example of Mrs. R. and other patriotic ladies. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Notice!

                Mrs. Woodall, from the General Hospital of Pemberton's Army, is now in the city, and the Military Aid Society is anxious to make a collection of all things needed in hospitals and which cannot be purchased, that she may take charge of them and take them on to Meridian for the use of the wounded in the impending battles along the Mississippi lines.
               
Contributions are solicited of old rags, spices and liquors of all kinds; old stockings, net shirts; old stockings and socks are especially solicited, they make the best covering for wounds, from the fact of their retaining moisture longer than other rags.  All things sent to the Society rooms on Jackson street, between Dauphin and St. Francis, will be packed for Mrs. Woodall.  Contributions are requested to be sent at the earliest possible time. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, January 1, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Concert for the Soldiers.  The young ladies of Church Hill, having learned, through the Rev. R. M. Miller, who is just from Grenada, that the members of a battalion, composed of Alabamians and Mississippians, are almost entirely destitute of socks, propose giving a concert on Wednesday evening, Jan. 7th, at the residence of Mrs. A. N. Beavin, the proceeds of which will be devoted to the relief of the above mentioned battalion.  Mr. Miller's stay at home is but limited, hence our haste in endeavoring to procure the requisite articles. We hope the short notice given our friends will not prevent their attendance, provided with socks.
    
           Doors open at &.  Performances to begin at 7 1/2 o'clock.  Price of admission 1 pr. socks, or $1.  jan1.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, January 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Blankets and Supplies for the Soldier.

                We are prone to forget that there are many a poor soldier, who are yet without blankets these cold, stormy nights.  Warm ourselves, we are too apt to forget those who are in the field, suffering from exposure.  We are informed that there is still a great lack of blankets and socks.  If we look around our premises, cannot we find one or more carpet that can be spared; a few more pairs of socks?  If so, let them be forwarded immediately to Mr. James Carradine's store.  The soldiers are yet in want; let us respond to their wants, liberally and promptly. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, January 21, 1863, p. 3, c. 7

Socks for the Soldiers!

I will give for good Socks of all sizes--Cotton 75, Woolen $1 00, and want all I can get soon, as the poor soldiers are suffering for them.
Jan 21.                                                                                                                    I. M. Kenney.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 4, 1863, p. 3, c. 4

For the Southern Banner.
To the Women of Oglethorpe.

                The quartermaster General of Georgia has made a stirring appeal to you for "Socks for the Soldiers!"  Shall it be in vain?  To be free from the thralldom of death to all your hopes--to be worthy matrons, wives, sisters and daughters of the noble men now battling for all we hold dear on earth, you will nobly respond now and in the future, as you have so nobly done in the past, to every call made upon you.  I am well assured of this fact.  I merely wish to call your attention to the request of Gen. Foster, believing, as I most sincerely do, that in no other land on this earth, does there dwell a more self-sacrificing--a more determined, or a more homogeneous aggregate of patriotic woman than are found within the lines of Oglethorpe county.  Send me your socks, then, with your names upon each pair.  Let your servants knit for the soldiers and put their names too upon their contributions.  Let the little daughters knit socks also, and put their names and ages on each pair:--So that I may fill my large box to running over, and so that no "brave soldier boy" from Oglethorpe county can ever say that the frosts and snows were destroying his efficiency for want of socks.
                                                                                               
Francis James Robinson,
                                                                                                               
Clerk Superior Court.
Lexington, Ga., Feb'ry 2d, 1863.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, February 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
    
           WORTHY OF IMITATION.--We have been informed that Mr. B. J. Smith, principal, of the Austin Collegiate Female Institute, has established a rule in his school, that each young lady shall knit six pairs of socks for our soldiers now in the field, and that he has set aside a certain sum for the purpose of procuring woolen yarn for those who cannot furnish it themselves.  This is a praiseworthy undertaking, and, if carried out generally in all the other female seminaries in our State, would furnish a large supply of a very necessary article in time for the next winter campaign, should the war last that long.  It will also, in addition, teach the young ladies a very valuable and important branch of their education.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, February 10, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Socks for the Soldiers.  Having been detached from the 4th Kentucky Regiment, commanded by Col. R. P. Trahue, for the purpose of collecting a supply of socks for them, I will remain in Natchez a few days, and shall be pleased to receive from the benevolent citizens of Natchez and Adams county, any number of Cotton or Woolen Socks that can be collected to the number of 800.  Persons from the country may send to Mr. Jas. Carradine or Fleming & Baldwin's.
                                                                                               
Julius O. Metcalfe, 4th Ky. Reg.
Natchez, Feb. 10, 1863.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, February 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Knitting Machines.—The Columbus Sun says that Mr. Keith, of that city, has a knitting machine in operation, which lays the nimble fingers of our fair ones completely in the back ground.  Mr. K. has three of these machines, and is preparing to put them in operation when he will be able to turn out several dozen pairs of hose each day.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 25, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

To the Women of Clark County.

                I have forwarded 400 pair of socks to Atlanta.  I have now on hand between 50 and 100 pair.  Contributions come in daily.  One generous woman, this week, gives 10.  Shall I get 1000 pair from the women and children of noble old Clark?
    
           John Calvin Johnson, Cl'k.
Feb. 20, 1863. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, March 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Practical Hints for the Times.
Knitted Garments.

                The crochet—or hooked—needle gives such rapid results that it is surprising we do not see more of its products in common use.  For coarse work, its advantage over the common knitting needle is as ten to one.  In the articles of male attire—the ladies will pardon my non intrusion into the secret domain of the toilet and bureau—the crochet needle would be found superlatively useful in furnishing the country with gloves, socks and stockings—with the heel and toe knitted in the ordinary way, to avoid the rough knots—cravats, scarfs for the ears and neck, undershirts, drawers, and what would be as  exceedingly great comfort to our soldiers on night duty a helmet of woolen yarn, made to protect the head, ears, chin and neck, and worn under the military cap.

Winter Yarns.

                The scarcity of wool compels us to look around for substitutes.  The warmest pair of gloves ever worn by the writer was made of rabbit fur, carded and spun with cotton.  The negro clothes manufactured by our Yankee friends, in former years, were more or less intermixed with cow hair.  The idea may be useful.
               
If all the scraps of tattered blankets and worn out carpets that are now left to decay, on every square mile of these Confederate States—to say nothing of the wool locked up in mattresses—were picked to pieces, and carded with cotton, they would probably suffice to furnish more than half the socks now needed by our soldiers.  True, the staple will be found short and crisp, and probably the barbs of the wool would be worn smooth, but these defects will be met and remedied, in part, by mixing the wool with cotton.

Spinning Thread or Yarn.

                When factories fail to supply the demand, and spinning wheels cannot be had, and even when cards are beyond reach, there is yet a resource to be had in the instrument used before either factories or spinning wheels were known, and mentioned by Solomon in his last chapter of the book of Proverbs, where in his graphic picture of the virtuous woman, he says:  "She layeth her hands to the spindle and her hands hold the distaff."  The simple process to which he alludes, and which was then the only mode of spinning, was this:  The wool, flax, or cotton was loosely distributed over a small branching [illegible] or leafless bush from which it was fed to the spindle and the last of steel, like the spindles of our ordinary spinning wheels, or of tough hard wood, was loaded near the blunt end with a disk of metal or a ball of hardened clay, and was twirled by the fingers like a child's [illegible] or button with a straw stuck through it.  The revolutions of this spindle accomplishes the twisting of the thread, as we do now by the more rapid and [illegible] instrumentality of the wheel or the [illegible] as the process may be, it can be made to give excellent thread and yarn, which may be more economical than the now costly hanks of the factory.  Many years since there was a poor person in the neighborhood of Savannah who plied one of the instruments just described, with surprising dexterity and success.  It can be done again. . . .

Substitute for Socks.

                In Galton's "Art of Travel" an English work containing many useful hints, it is [illegible] that in some respects a [most of this section illegible.] . . . .
                                                                       
[apparently from Savannah Republican.] 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, March 18, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

Wanted Immediately!

Mountain Irish Potatoes, Rye, Flour, Good Lard, New Bacon; Tallow, Beeswax, Butter, Eggs, Rags, Cotton and Woollen Socks for soldiers, Gray and Brown jeans for Soldiers, striped and checked cloth--for which the best market price will be paid, cash up.
March 18.              I.. M. Kenney.

 

PEORIA (IL) MORNING MAIL, March 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 5

Aiken's [sic?]
Knitting Machine.

                It the most useful and desirable article ever invented for a woman to earn money with, it will give her a most agreeable employment by which she can make great profits.
               
It can be made, in the hands of woman, to earn with ease and comfort, $10 to $20 per week.  An old lady, too old to do anything else, can earn money right along by its use.

Aikin's Knitting Machine.

                Young ladies who want to earn some money, can, by the use of this machine, employ a part or the whole of their time very independently and satisfactorially [sic].
               
A farmer, who raises wool, cannot afford to be without a machine.  If he raised $50 worth the machine will convert the $50 worth into $100 worth.
               
A farmer has girls growing up, he wants them to earn something.  In no other way can they do it so respectably and agreeably as by the use of this machine.
               
Wives and families of Volunteers find in it their best friend and protector.  Whole families can be supported by its use.  Thousands attest to this fact.

Aikin's Knitting Machine.

                It knits the material for a pair of Stockings in four minutes.  In a day a woman can make and finish complete for market from one dozen to two dozen pairs.
               
The stitch it makes is precisely the same as that made with Knitting Needles, except in this:  that the machine makes it firmer and more durable than the needles can possibly.
               
It knits the Stockings all but the tip of the toe; the heel is knit on the machine, narrowing and widening is done by simple motion of the [rib?] screw.
               
It knits a great variety of fancy work, such as Shawls, Nubias, Opera Capes, Under Sleeves, Comforts, Military Sashes, Sontags, Rigolets, Clouds, Head Dresses, Tidies, &c., &c.

Aikin's Knitting Machine.

                It knits Under Shirts and Drawers, the most serviceable and durable that can be made; also, Table Covers, Suspenders, Purses, Cravats, Leggins, &c.
               
It is so simple that a child can comprehend it, and know the "why and wherefore" of it.  A Sewing Machine may be used for years and the operator hardly know how the stitch is made.
               
It cannot get out of order, if well used, so simple is its construction.  If it get out of order so that it can't be fixed in five minutes we will give the purchaser a new machine.
               
It is portable--weight complete but forty pounds, and can be carried as easily as a valise of same weight.  The freight on it to any point is from 50 cents to $1.50.

Aikin's Knitting Machine.

                It can be made to earn more in one month than a Sewing Machine can in a year.  It is an actual producer of goods for sale—goods for which there is always a market.
               
By its use a woman feels independent, and that she is "doing business on her own account."  She knits yarn into stockings, sells them and knits more.
               
Every country merchant can employ one or more Machines with great profit, knitting the yarn he takes in into stocking for retail and wholesale trade.
               
It is no new, untried thing, but has been in most successful use in all the Factories of the East, so that now millions of collars worth of goods are every year made on it.

Aikin's Knitting Machine.

                Some say, "Why, it will soon knit enough to glut the market!"  No so.  Twenty million dollars worth of such goods are annually imported.  Stop importations.
               
It is used in Penitentiaries, Blind Asylums, and other public institutions, where there are many feet to clothe.  Blind women can work it very successfully.
               
Soldier's Aid Societies, Mite Societies, &c., find this machine a most useful and satisfactory article.  By its use they are enabled to accomplish much to enhance the comforts of the soldier and the poor.

Price of Machine Complete, $50.

                For other information, send for circular and samples of work.  (Send stamp.)  Agents wanted in every considerable town.  Address

Branson & Elliot, General Agents,

120 Lake Street Chicago

N.B.—Should any of the readers of the MAIL desire this Machine, the Proprietor of this paper can order it for them at manufacturers' prices. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON], May 5, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
Savannah Wove Socks.--We have upon our table a pair of soldier's thick cotton socks woven by machinery by Mr. Hacket, of this city, which are superior to any we have ever seen, either of domestic or foreign manufacture.  We understand that the machine is capable of weaving several pairs of socks per hour, which only require a little finishing at the heel and toe by hand to complete a most perfect and serviceable article--Savannah News.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, June 17, 1863, p. 3, c. 2

                                                                Meeting of the Ladies of Athens.

                                                                                                                Athens, June 12th 1863.
    
           In response to a call by the President of the Ladies' Volunteer Association, Mrs. Rutherford, the ladies of Athens assembled at the Town Hall, on Thursday, June 11th, to elect the officers of the Association for the ensuing year.  The same corps of officers were retained, with one exception.
    
           The Secretary read the annual report.  The amount of work accomplished during the year being as follows:  339 shirts, 349 pr drawers, 155 pr socks, 159 pr pants, 49 coats, 36 comforts, 9 mattrasses [sic], 15 overshirts, 27 sundries.  Total, 1,138 articles.--After supplying the four companies during the year, the following amount of clothing still remains in possession of the Society:  103 shirts, 81 pair drawers, 41 pr socks.  Hospital supplies have been forwarded as follows:  To Atlanta, 6 boxes hospital stores.--To Richmond, Va., 7 boxes, 1 barrel, $138.  To Dalton, Ga. 1 box, 25 shirts, 17 pr drawers, 30 pr socks, 5 comforts, ? mattr'ses.  To Union Point, one supply for hospital.

                                                                Treasurer's Report.

Cash received,                                                                      $596 40
Cash paid out,                                                                        296 40
Balance on hand June 11th,                                                   $300 00
    
           Amount collected for relief of Fredericksburg sufferers, $752.
    
           The President introduced the following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted by the meeting.  They are considered equally obligatory on absent members:
    
           Resolved, That each member of the Society will furnish six pair socks during the next six months.
    
           Resolved, That each member of the Society will furnish six bottles wine during the ensuing four months.
    
           Resolved, That no member of the Society shall refuse work sent by her Directress, unless a case of violent illness shall justify a conscientious rejection.
    
           Without further business, the meeting adjourned.                        P. Thomas.
                                                                                                                  
Secretary & Treasurer.
L.  Rutherford, President. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], June 12, 1863, p. 2, c. 8
Home Knit Socks.  We have on hand a large lot of Home Knit Wool Socks, which we offer for sale.  Also Striped Shirts and other articles in the Clothing and Furnishing line.
                                                                                                                       
W. F. Herring & Co.,
                                                                                                                               
Atlanta, Ga. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], June 27, 1863, p. 2, c. 8

Knitting Machines Wanted.

We are engaged in manufacturing Army Socks for the Confederate Government and want to obtain more Machines.
Parties owning any of Aiken's machines, no matter what gage, and who are willing to sell for $200, will please forward to us per Express C. O. D.

                                                               
                                John Judge & Co., Columbia, S. C. 

SAN ANTONIO HERALD, July 25, 1863, p. 2, c. 4
               
The Ladies' Southern Aid Society of San Antonio is much indebted to Mrs. Houston for a supply of Knitting Yarn prepared by her own hands for the benefit of our soldiers this winter.  The members of our society will get any amount they may wish for knitting by applying to Mrs. Maverick, the Treasurer.  The President of the society recommends busy fingers as a relief for the anxious hearts of her country women in this hour of trouble, which doubtless is the prelude to a brilliant day for our beloved South. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, August 12, 1863, p. 3, c. 4

Socks!  Socks!  Socks!

                Wanted for Georgia Soldiers before Winter:  5,000 pairs Cotton and Wool Socks.  Go to knitting.  I will pay for best cotton socks 85 cents.  Best wool socks, $1.25.--For the Georgia Relief & Hospital Association, by whom the socks are given, free of cost to Georgia soldiers.
Aug. 12                                                                                                  I. M. Kenney.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, September 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 2
                                                                                               
Camp Near Orange C. H. Va.
                                                                                                               
Aug. 31, 1863.
Miss Paulina Thomas,
               
Sec. Ladies' Aid Society, Athens, Ga.
    
           I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the following articles of clothing for the "Athens Guards:"  ten pair socks, eleven shirts, and nine pairs drawers.  Twenty-three Testaments were also received. . . .  When the women of the south give their smiles and words of hope to cheer the Southern soldiers, while their needles industriously contribute to their comfort, we will not despair of the achievement of Southern independence. . . .
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Cotton and Wool Cards for Socks.

                                                                                                            Office of Clothing Bureau   }
                                                                                                           
Mil. Dist. Texas, &c.          }
                                                                                                           
Houston, Sept. 24th, 1863.}
               
Any person delivering twenty-five pairs of homemade Socks, strong and well made, to Capt. W. J. Mills, A. Q. M., in charge of the Clothing Depot, at Houston, will receive one pair of cotton or wool Cards, at their option.
                                                               
                                                E. C. Wharton,
                                                                                                     
Major & Q. M. Chief of Bureau.
 

ATLANTA [GA] DAILY INTELLIGENCER, October 11, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

To the Women of Georgia.

                                                                                                Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 9, 1863.
    
           You responded nobly to my first appeal to you for socks.  But few anticipated the measure of our success.  From *my heart* I thank you for what you have so cheerfully and so promptly done.  You have enabled me to make many a war worn soldier bless the dear women at home, as he placed your love tokens on his weary feet.
    
           Women of Georgia, and such others as contributed to my sock fund, in the name of over 10,000 soldiers, do I most cordially thank you.  But you must enlarge the circle of your benefactions.  God loves the cheerful giver and also the liberal soul.  Let us devise and execute liberal things.  It will take, besides what I have on hand, nearly 50,000 pair of socks to carry our Georgia *heroes* comfortably through the coming winter.  Send in those already knit under my late call.  Ship to me at this place as before directed.  Organize *at once*, throughout Georgia, into Societies, and let your Secretaries, with the approval of your Presidents make requisitions on me for the number of bunches of yarn which each Society will undertake to work into socks.  I hope to make arrangements for point, and I will forward the yarn required.  Continue to place the name upon each pair of socks knit and sent.  I am keeping a *faithful* record of the names of my fair colleagues in this good work, with an account of the amount of work done by each one.  May I not hope to put upon every Georgian in the army needing them a good pair of socks before spring.  Methinks I hear a hundred thousand women, answering, Yes, send on your yarns; we will soon fill your the [sic] bill.--By the bloom which has lately been over us, let me exhort you to redoubled energies for those who are your *only preservers*, under God, from a far deeper gloom and an intolerable destiny.   By the groans of our wounded and the deaths of our noble sons on our battlefields all over the South, whose deeds of imperishable glory have illustrated names that mankind will not willingly let die, let me exhort you to strain every nerve to hold up the courage and strengthen the arms of those from a far deeper gloom and an intolerable destiny.   By the groans of our wounded and the deaths of our noble sons on our battlefields all over the South, whose deeds of imperishable glory have illustrated names that mankind will not willingly let die, let me exhort you to strain every nerve to hold up the courage and strengthen the arms of those still surviving the shock of battle!  By the brightness of the future, opened up by the glorious and God-given victory upon the banks of that stream of death, the now historic Chicamauga, let us thank God, take courage and press forward, till we conquer a peace.
    
           Let the loss of some dear father, husband, son, brother or *loved one,* nerve you to redoubled determination *never* to cease struggling till we are thoroughly and totally divorced form those whose hands are red with the best blood of the Confederate States.--  Cheer our soldiers, discourage desertions, hurry off able bodied furloughed men to the front and stimulate them to prefer honorable deaths in the face of the enemy, to dishon-lives [sic] prolonged by shrinking from duty.--Women of Georgia, you have done much in our great and bloody struggle.  You can and will do much more, and your heroism will be admired wherever and as long as true patriotism shall find a lodgment in the human heart.  Let the example of the three patriots of Switzerland, headed by the heroic William Tell, who took a solemn vow to cease not in their efforts until Switzerland was free from the horrid tyranny of the infamous Gasler; *fire* our hearts to choose annihilation rather than subjugation.  The one will give us an honorable record, the other a sickly existence under the most abhorrent of despotisms.  The one is the result of a noble self-respect, the other the fruit of a degraded self-abasement.  Rather than yield when our men fail us, let us have multiplied examples of the Maid of Orleans, who when wounded by an arrow, drew out the arrow, exclaiming, "It is glory, not blood which flows from the wound."  But I need not write about yielding, with an humble reliance upon the God of battles, if we, men and women, will but do our duty before another year shall roll over us, the bloody sword will likely be sheathed, and the bright banner of peace will gloriously waive over our ransomed homes.
                                                                                               
Ira R. Foster,
                                                               
                                Q. M. Gen. of Georgia.
    
           All papers in the State are requested to give the above one or two insertions and much oblige our Georgia soldiers.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 13, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

To the Women of Georgia.

                                                                                                                Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 9, 1863.
               
You responded nobly to my first appeal to you for socks.  But few anticipated the measure of our success.  From my heart I thank you for what you have so cheerfully and so promptly done.  You have enabled me to make many a war worn soldier bless the dear women at home, [illegible] placed your love tokens on his weary feet.
               
Women of Georgia, and such others as contributed to my sock fund, in the name of over 10,000 soldiers, do I most cordially thank you.  But you must enlarge the circle of your benevolence [illegible].  Let us devise and execute liberal things.  It will take, besides what I have on hand, nearly 50,000 pair of socks to carry our Georgia heroes comfortably through the coming winter.  Send in those already knitted under my late call.  Ship to me at this place as before directed.  Organize at once, throughout Georgia, into Societies, and let your Secretaries, with the approval of your Presidents, make requisitions on me for the number of bunches of yarn which each Society will undertake to work into socks.  I hope to make arrangements for an ample supply of yarns for the purpose contemplated.  Notify me of your nearest railroad point, and I will forward the yarn required.  Continue to place the name upon each pair of socks knit and sent.  I am keeping a faithful record of the names of my fair colleagues in this good work, with an account of the amount of work done by each one.  May I not hope to put upon every Georgian in the army needing them a good pair of socks before Spring.  Methinks I hear a hundred thousand women, answering, Yes, send on your yarns; we will soon fill your bill.  By the gloom which has lately been over us, let me exhort you to redouble energies for those who are your only preservers, under God, from a far deeper gloom and an intolerable destiny.  By the groans of our wounded and the deaths of our noble sons on our battlefields all over the South, whose deeds of imperishable glory, have illustrated names that mankind will not willingly let die, let me exhort you to strain every nerve to hold up the courage and strengthen the arms of those still surviving the shock of battle!  By the brightness of the future, opened up by the glorious and God given victory upon the banks of that stream of death, the now historic Chickamauga, let us thank God, take courage and press forward till we conquer a peace.
               
Let the loss of some dear father, husband, son, brother or loved one, serve you to redoubled determination never to cease struggling till we are thoroughly and totally divorced from those whose hands are red with the best blood of the Confederate States.  Cheer our soldiers, discourage desertions, hurry off able-bodied furloughed men to the front and stimulate them to prefer honorable deaths in the face of the enemy, to dishonored lives prolonged by shrinking from duty.  Women of Georgia, you have done much in our great and bloody struggle.  You can and will do much more, and your heroism will be admired wherever and as long as true patriotism shall find a lodgment in the human heart.  Let the example of the three patriots of Switzerland, headed by the heroic William Tell, who took a solemn vow to cease not in their efforts until Switzerland was free from the horrid tyranny of the infamous Gesler, fire our hearts to choose annihilation rather than subjugation.  The one will give us an honorable record, the other a sickly existence under the most abhorred of despotism.  The one is the result of a degraded self-abasement, [illegible] men fail us, let us have multiplied examples of the Maid of Orleans, who, when wounded by an arrow, drew out the arrow, exclaiming, "It is glory, not blood which flows from the wound."  But I need not write about yielding, with an humble reliance upon the God of battles, if we, men and women, will but do our duty before another year shall roll over us, the bloody sword will likely be sheathed, and the bright banner of peace will gloriously waive over our ransomed homes.
                                                                                                                               
Ira R. Foster,
                                                                                                                    
Q. M. Gen. of Georgia.

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 14, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
It would seem from an article in this morning's Telegraph that the offer made by Maj. Wharton of one pair of cards for 25 pair of soldier's socks was not understood to be a fair remuneration for the socks, but was all Maj. W. was authorized to offer, as the government price for the cards is $25, and for the socks $1 a pair.  It appears that 100,000 pair of socks are now wanted for our soldiers to prevent them from suffering during the approaching winter, and Maj. W. is doing all the regulations allow him to do to supply that want.  It cannot of course be expected that poor families will undertake to knit socks for so inadequate a remuneration, but the deficiency ought to be supplied by those who are able, while ladies who are able to do it may knit socks for the offer made or without any remuneration, or may put their negro servants to knitting for the soldiers so as to save them from suffering.  If all the women in Texas would apply themselves to supplying this important want, our soldiers would be comfortably supplied in less time than we are talking about it. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 19, 1863, p. 1, c. 4

[For the Republican]

                                                                                                                Savannah, Ga., Oct. 13
To the Ladies of Savannah,
               
Mr. Editor:--Will you allow me a short space in your columns, through which I wish to address a word to the Ladies of Savannah.  In your issue of a few days ago, I noticed an appeal from Mr. Ira R. Foster, the Quartermaster General of Georgia, to the Ladies, in which he says there are now fifty thousand pairs of socks wanted before our troops in the field can be supplied.  He makes a proposition, which I think a very good one—that is, to form societies for the purpose of knitting socks for the soldiers, and promise to furnish as much yarn as each society will volunteer to knit into socks.  Surely every Georgian will respond to the call.  I, for one, am willing to enter the field at once.  Now, are there not others who will unite with me to assist in forming in our city a society, to be called "The Ladies' Knitting Society."  I will put the ball in motion, and if a few others will join with me we will keep it going until the good work gets bravely on in our midst, and thousands shall reap the benefit of our labors.  Let us hear from the fair daughters of Savannah on the subject.  Let every one respond to the call.

Socks for the Soldiers.

Oh women of the sunny South
               
We want you in the field;
Not with a soldier's uniform,
               
Nor sword, nor spear, nor shield;
But with a weapon quite as keen—
               
The knitting needle bright—
And willing hands to knit for those
               
Who for our country fight. 

Then let the cry go far and near
               
And reach you every one—
Socks!  socks are needed—send them on
               
For every gallant son!
Shall those who bear the Summer's heat,
               
And Winter's cold and rain,
Barefooted trudge o'er bleeding fields,
               
Our liberty to gain? 

No!  Georgia's daughters will arise,
               
And answer to the call;
We'll send you socks for our brave boys,
               
Some large, and others small.
With every stitch we'll pray that God
               
Will shield each gallant form;
And while they fight with willing hands
               
We'll work to keep them warm. 

Our brave boys shall not bear alone
               
The burden of the day,
We'll toil for them with willing hands,
               
And watch, and hope, and pray!
With useful hands to work at home,
               
And fighting men abroad,
We'll conquer if we only place
               
A holy trust in God. 

We cannot sit with idle hands,
               
And let our brave boys fight;
Not while the motto on each heart
               
Is Liberty and Right!
What though we cannot wield the sword,
               
We're with you, hand and heart,
And every daughter of the South
               
Will bravely act her part. 

We're in the field—then send us thread,
               
As much as you can spare,
And socks we'll furnish for our troops,
               
Yea, thousands through the year.
Ho for the knitting needle, then,
               
To work without delay.
Hurrah! we'll try our best to knit
               
A pair of socks a day!
                                                                               
Carrie Bell Sinclair. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 3

To the Women of Georgia.

                                                                                                                Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 9, 1863.
               
You responded nobly to my first appeal to you for socks.  But few anticipated the measure of our successes.  From my heart I thank you for what you have so cheerfully and promptly done.  You have enabled me to make many a war worn soldier bless the women at home, as he placed your love tokens on his weary feet.
               
Women of Georgia, and such others as contributed to my stock fund, in the name of over 10,000 soldiers, do I most cordially thank you.  But you must enlarge the circle of your benefactions.  God loves the cheerful giver and also the liberal soul.  Let us devise and execute liberal things.  It will take besides what I have on hand, nearly 50,000 pair of socks to carry our Georgia heroes comfortably through the coming Winter.—Send in those already knit under my late call.  Ship to me at this lace as before directed.  Organize at once, throughout Georgia, into Societies, and let your Secretaries, with the approvals of your Presidents make requisitions on me for the number of bunches of yarn which each Society will undertake to work into socks.  I hope to make arrangements for an ample supply of yarns for the purpose contemplated.  Notify me at your nearest railroad point, and I will forward the yarn required.  Continue to place the name upon each pair of socks knit and sent.  I am keeping a faithful record of the names of my fair colleagues in this good work done by each one.  May I not hope to put upon every Georgian in the army needing them a good pair of socks before spring.  Methinks I hear a hundred thousand women, answering.  Yes, send on your yarns; we will soon fill the bill.  By the gloom which has lately been over us, let me exhort you to redouble energies for those who are your only preserve, under God, from a far deeper gloom and an intolerable destiny.  By the groans of our wounded and the deaths of our noble sons on our battlefields all over the South, whose deeds of imperishable glory have illustrated names that mankind will not willingly let die, let me exhort you to strain every nerve to hold up the courage and strengthen the arms of t hose still surviving the shock of battle!
               
By the brightness of the future, opened up by the glorious and God-given victory upon the banks of the stream of death, the now historic Chickamauga, let us thank God, take courage and press forward, till we conquer a peace.
               
Let the loss of some dear father, husband, son, or brother, or loved one, nerve you to redoubled determination never to cease struggling till we are thoroughly and totally divorced from those whose hands are red with the best blood of the Confederate States.  Cheer our soldiers, discourage desertions, hurry off able-bodied furloughed men to the front, and stimulate them to prefer an honorable death in the face of the enemy, to dishonorable lives prolonged by shrinking from duty.  Women of Georgia!  you have done much in our great and bloody struggle.  You can and will do much more, and y our heroism will be admired wherever and as long as true patriotism shall find a lodgment in the human heart.  Let the example of the tree patriots of Switzerland, headed by the heroic William Tell, who took a solemn vow to cease not in their efforts until Switzerland was free from the horrid tyranny of the infamous Gesler, fire our hearts to choose annihilation rather than subjugation.
               
The one will give an honorable record, the other a sickly existence under the most abhorrent of despotisms.  The one is a result of a noble self respect, the other the fruit of a degraded self abasement.  Rather than yield when our men fail us, let us have multiplied examples of the Maid of Orleans, who, when wounded by an arrow, drew out the arrow, exclaiming, "It is glory not blood which flows from the wound."  But I need not write about yielding.  With an humble reliance upon the God of battles, if we, men and women, will but do our duty, before another year shall roll over us, the bloody sword will likely be sheathed and the bright banner of peace will gloriously wave over our ransomed homes.
                                                                                                                               
Ira R. Foster,
                                                                                                                 
Q.M. General of Georgia.

NASHVILLE DISPATCH, October 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

About Stockings.

                The Empress Eugenie, having established crinoline, has allowed her imagination to take a lower flight, and aspire to set the feminine world its fashion in the matter of stockings.  She has discarded white stockings, and wears blue and white striped, though she should have added a third color, namely, red, and then she should have the tri-color just where the legitimists would to have it like under her foot.  Can her hostility to white stockings be based on the circumstances that white is the old Bourbon color, if white can be called a color?  Certainly the change she has introduced cannot be held an improvement, white stockings being for woman the prettiest things in which they can put their pretty feet.  "A white stocking is infinitely more effective than a black one," says Mr. Hawthorne, speaking with express reference to young women's feet, and so forth; and few will dissent from his opinion.  It is better than any other kind of stocking.  James II, when Duke of York, preferred to green stockings, on an interesting occasion, as readers of Grammont will recollect; but he was not a disinterested judge.  Blue stockings are objects of prejudice, though Francis Jeffrey said that it mattered little how blue the stocking is, provided the petticoats be long enough to hide it; but long petticoats are a nuisance, and petticoats never can be tolerated long anywhere.  Black stockings ought to be worn only under peculiar circumstances.  Flesh-colored stockings are open to the charge of being delusive.  The yellow stocking belongs properly only to English charity boys; and the red stocking should be confined to very young people, or to persons old enough to be in their second childhood, or to cardinals.  Pink stockings are nice in their places, which are the feet of young women, but they do not show well on either middle-aged or large ladies, who are often very handsome, and therefore should have handsome footings.  In fact, the pink stocking is fit for girls only.  Grey stockings go well with grey hairs.  Mixed, or speckled, or spotted, or ringed, or streaked stockings can be used for show only by children, though some of them answer for a change.  But none or all of these can displace the white stocking, which is an old favorite, and not to be put down, though occasionally it may be thrown into the back ground.  Like the hoop, it is never long out of fashion.  The French Empress will find that she has "put her foot into it" by taking it out of the white stocking, which is to women what to the garden is the white rose. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 27, 1863, p.  1, c. 8
               
Eugenie and Striped Stockings.—The Paris correspondent of the Liverpool Courier says:
               
The Empress, you are aware, possesses the immortal glory of having invented, or at least revived crinoline petticoats.  Such a brilliant act would have fully satisfied the ambition of an ordinary woman.  But Her Majesty has a lofty soul, and aspires to the glory of making another revolution in female costume.  Fir thirty or forty years past, and for ought I know, more, French ladies have been faithful to the white stocking, and they have firmly set their faces against the attempt of English ladies to introduce the red one.  The Empress, thinking that the eternal white had become rather monotonous—the red was too glaring, and blue too literary—asked herself if some other color could not be adopted.  She though long and anxiously; and at last, inspiration came—the stocking might be striped!  The day after this mental illumination the Imperial ankles, and some little space above them, came forth adorned with stockings of blue and white stripes; and all the courtiers proclaimed it the union of the two colors, ravishing to behold.  By this time next year, no doubt the new fashion will be as prevalent as that of crinoline.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 11, 1863, p. 2, c. 6
               
We have received thirty pants of excellent woollen socks from Mrs. Scott, of Waverly, which, as requested, we shall deliver to Major Durant, to be distributed to the California troops in Phillip's regiment.  This is a valuable [sic], and will doubtless be a most acceptable contribution.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 18, 1863, p. 2, c. 3

Ladies' Knitting Society.

                Ladies engaged in knitting socks for the Society will please hand them in on or before Saturday morning, to be forwarded on to the Quartermaster General of Georgia.  The weather is getting cold, and our soldiers are greatly in need of them.
                                                                                                               
Carrie Bell Sinclair,
                                                                                               
President Ladies' Knitting Society.
 

[ATLANTA] DAILY INTELLIGENCER, November 21, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
Young Ladies' Patriotic Society.--This Society was organized Oct. 1st, 1863, and having been only six weeks in operation, have returned to the St. Philips Aid Society fifty three pieces of work.  Thread has been given us by General Foster for knitting.  As we have very few members who know how to knit, the thread is being used very slowly.  As yet, the society is composed of very young members, which has caused a great many to call it a juvenile affair, but the young Ladies of Atlanta are invited to join it.  Surely, some of the Ladies who have *so much* patriotism, will not refuse to join a society that will require *one* garment a week from them.  The Society meets every Saturday afternoon at *three* o'clock, at the City Hall.
                                                                                                               
L. R. Wright, Pres't.
Lizzie Judson, Sec'y.           
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], December 23, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

Clothing for the Soldiers.

                                                                                            Cartersville, Ga., December 21, 1863.
Editors Appeal:  The fact is now notorious that many of the soldiers in the army of Tennessee are destitute of clothing, and are likely to suffer during the winter.  Several communications on the subject have already appeared in the papers, but I am not aware that any general steps have been taken to meet the demands of the occasion.  A recent visit to the camps has satisfied me, if I wanted evidence, that there is need of all that can be done to make the condition of the soldier tolerable, and to enable him to meet the expectations of the public.  There soldiers have already drenched the soil of Georgia with their blood, in defense of the people, their homes and property, and to them and their gallantry they owe all that they now possess.  These soldiers, under grievous disadvantages, still present themselves as a wall of fire between the people of Georgia and their cruel and remorseless enemy.  No appeal can be more eloquent than the simple facts themselves, and surely will not go unheeded by a generous people.  Let it be remembered that among these troops are a large number who are cut off from their own States and peoples by the occupation of the enemy, and who have no resource except upon the general Government.
    
           To aid in meeting these wants of the soldiers, the ladies of Cartersville and vicinity have organized themselves into an association to manufacture comforts and socks, and a liberal fund has already been subscribed by a number of the gentlemen to inaugurate the business and to purchase material.  It is believed that comforts, made of thin domestic, stuffed with cotton, will make the cheapest substitute for blankets, and can be manufactured with great expedition.  Socks, made of cotton yarn, will answer a valuable purpose, and can be supplied in great numbers.
    
           Now I desire you to bring this subject to the notice of your readers by publishing this communication, and by such other suggestions as may occur to you, in order to impress upon all the importance of the object in view.  The ladies, I am sure, are ready to work, and surely the gentlemen can afford to contribute the amount of money required.  We must all act in this great struggle if we desire to save the country from ruin.        Amicus.
                                                                                                                               
C. J. Jenkins
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

Ladies' Knitting Society.

                Having received from the Quartermaster General a large supply of knitting thread, members of the Society, or any one interested in the soldiers, can be supplied by calling on me any time during the week.
               
We have been unable to supply all who have come forward and entered their names as members of the Society, having been entirely out of thread for the last two or three weeks.  But we have now on hand enough for eighty or ninety pair of socks, and we hope those interested in the matter will come forward now and assist us in getting them done as early as possible.  With the beginning of the New Year, let us renew our efforts in behalf of the suffering soldiers, and do all that we can for their comfort.
                                                                                                               
Carrie Bell Sinclair,
                                                                                               
President Ladies' Knitting Society.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, January 1, 1864, p. 1, c. 7
               
Woolen Socks for the Army.—The following directions, which have been furnished by a lady of much experience, may prove useful to those who will engage in knitting woolen socks for the army.  The yarn should be bluish grey, No. 22, and the needles No. 14 to 15:
               
Set twenty-seven stitches on each needle; knit the plain and two seam rows alternately until the ribbing is three inches long; then knit plain seven inches for the leg, remembering to seam one stitch at the end of one needle.  To form the heel, put twenty stitches on two of the needles, and forty-on on the other—the seam stitch being in the middle.  Knit the first row plain, the next row seam, and so alternately until the heel is three inches long, then narrow off the plain row each side of the seam stitch for five plain rows, which will leave thirty-one stitches.  To close the heel, knit the last seam row to the middle of the needle, knit the seam stitch plain, then fold the two needles together, and with another needle take off the seam stitch.  Then knit a stitch from both needles at once and bind the seam stitch over it.  Continue knitting in this manner until but one is left and the heel closed.  Take up as many stitches as there are rows around the heel; knit one row plain; then widen every fifth stitch on the heel needles.  Narrow once on every round at each side of the foot until there are twenty-seven stitches on each needle; knit plain six inches; narrow at the beginning and end of each needle on every third round till you have seventeen stitches on each; then narrow every second till you have seven; then every round until the foot is closed.  One pound of yard, costing from seventy-five cents to one dollar, will furnish four pairs of socks. 

MISSOURI DEMOCRAT [ST. LOUIS], January 1, 1864, p. 2, c. 7
    
           Aiken's Knitting Machine--most useful article ever invented to aid women to earn a livelihood.  Any lady can earn from $10 to $30 per week with it.

Price of Machine, $75

For further information send for circular and examples of work, (enclose stamp).  Address
L. Broad, no. 26, North-Fifth street, St. Louis. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 4, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
A Good Idea.--We observe that the ladies of Mobile, in keeping with the fertility of resources and industry that has immortalized their sex during the war, are making socks from carpet ravellings.  They are a little heterogeneous in color, but not a whit the less warm for that, and will be most acceptable to the soldiers, or to those who need them at home.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
               
An old citizen of Dallas county says that a good article of worsted socks can be purchased in abundance in that county at five dollars per pair and Texas jeans at twenty dollars per yard.  This will, of course, be cheering news to many of our citizens, and especially to the editor of the State Gazette, who expresses an anxiety to procure such articles.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], January 28, 1864, p. 1, c. 3
Mrs. S. C. Law, at the head of a delegation of ladies, passed through our city last evening, in charge of five hundred blankets and fifteen hundred pair of socks, designed for the needy soldiers of Gen. Johnston's army.  This munificent donation to the gallant men of the Tennessee army, is the free will offering of the ladies of Columbus, Georgia, who have shown themselves untiring in their efforts to provide for the wants and comforts of our war-worn veterans.  Mrs. Law has been an active, energetic and efficient worker in the cause since the commencement of the war, and will be remembered as President of the Society of the Southern Mothers of Memphis, in which capacity she acted with great efficiency until that place fell into the possession of the enemy.  Her zeal in the cause, as well as that of her co-laborers, cannot be too highly commended.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 4, 1864, p. 3, c. 5

Socks for the Soldiers.

Wanted in any quantity.  The highest market price or more will be paid.  Be sure you come to me with them.
Feb. 3                                                                                                                     I.M. Kenney.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, February 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
For Knitters.--A lady, in an exchange, tells those who are knitting socks for the soldiers, that the yarn should be bluish grey, No. 22; the needles No. 15 or 16; the leg knit with 27 stitches on the needle; the ribbing three inches long, and then seven inches of plain before setting the heel; the heel itself should be three inches long before narrowing and closing.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, February 17, 1864, p. 1, c. 8
               
Hint to the Ladies.—As a general thing, says an exchange, a large proportion of the socks that have been sent to this office and forwarded to the soldiers are too small.  A tight fitting sock affords not half the comfort of a loose one, and will wear out in one third the time. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, February 18, 1864, p. 3, c. 1
               
A lady, in one of our exchanges, tells those who are knitting socks for the soldiers, that the yarn should be bluish gray, No. 22; the needles No. 14 or 15; the leg knit with twenty-seven stitches on the needle; the ribbing three inches long, and then seven inches of plain before setting the heel; the heel itself should be three inches long before narrowing and closing. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, March 23, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Mr. J. W. Young, of Eufala, Alabama, has three machines in operation, invented by himself, and which turn out three hundred pairs of socks per day. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 5, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
               
Manufactory of Socks in Georgia.—The city of Columbus, Ga., figures most prominently among the cities and towns that are exhibiting in local enterprises and factories encouraging evidence of our ability and resources wherever we find men of faith and spirit willing to try to help themselves and the cause, without exclusive reliance on Nassau and New York.  From the Columbus Times, we take some reports:
                Keith, Manly & Co. have in full blast five superior knitting machines, which are run by steam and capable of turning out one thousand pairs of socks per week.  It is calculated that in a short time, when they get their arrangements a little more perfected, they will be enabled to supply Johnson's army in socks.  The character of their work is very superior, and reflects upon their skill and pains the utmost credit.  Three of their machines are kept constantly running on soldiers' work.  One machine is engaged in knitting for children or rather youths.  One is engaged exclusively on ladies' stockings, and turns off as good and handsome work as the most fastidious could wish, specially when the yarn is fine and well prepared.
               
The yarn mostly used for soldiers' wear is prepared by the Eagle Factory, though they work up a considerable amount prepared by private hands.  The finest yarn used is prepared by the Macon and Tallahassee Factories, though they have not been able to effect arrangements by which to obtain a regular supply of this material, and only use it in filling out private contracts.  They also use various other qualities of yarn furnished by private individuals.  The work done is generally in accordance with the material furnished. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 7, 1864, p. 2, c. 5—copy ad for article

 Cotton Cards and Knitting Pins.
H. & M. Marx,
No. 73....Dauphin Street....No. 73

                Have just received a lot of genuine Whittemore's Cotton Cards and best Steel Knitting Pins. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 22, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
               
Southern Ingenuity—A new machine has recently been invented by Mr. O. D. Pease, an employee of the Naval Iron Works at Columbus, Ga., which manufactures knitting needles, almost as fast as a man can pick them up.  He has already turned out no less than sixty thousand setts of these needles, besides faithfully performing all his regular duties as a government employee during business hours.  Mr. Pease had many difficulties to contend with before he was able to get the machine in operation, but at last has been able to produce an article equal, if not superior, to those that are imported.  As there is a great demand for knitting needles, business men will do well to procure a supply of the different sizes, so that there need be no delay in furnishing our soldiers with plenty of socks on account of wanting the needles to knit them with. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 3, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Socks.--The knitting factory of J. Judge & Co., of Columbia, S. C. turns out 2500 to 3000 pairs of socks per day.  Seventy hands are employed in the factory, and some five or six hundred at their own houses in finishing them after the knitting is done. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], May 5, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
The Ladies' Soldiers Aid association, of Albemarle county, Va., (of which Miss Mary Randolph is president,) since the 1st of December last, have had wool carded and spun, and nine hundred pair of socks knit for the Government, besides giving away three hundred pair of their own.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA], May 5, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
The knitting factory of J. Judge & Co., of Columbia, S. C., turns out 2500 to 3000 pairs of socks per day.  Seventy hands are employed in the factory, and some five or six hundred at their own houses in finishing them after the knitting is done.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, May 15, 1864, p. 1, c. 7
               
The knitting factory of J. Judge & C., of Columbia, S. C., turns out from 2,500 to 3,000 pairs of socks per day.  Seventy hands are employed in the factory, and some five or six hundred at their own houses in finishing them after the knitting is done. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
Little steps towards Southern independence.--The following list of manufactories of general utility, not heretofore made in the South, is copied from exchanges within the past few days, says the Charlotte Bulletin.  It shows that our people are really making some progress towards the independence that we have heard talked of so much.  We have not included the cotton and woollen mills dotted here and there in all the States, or the iron establishments, or the Government works for making arms, powder, etc.
               
We have not doubt there are many other establishments of which we have seen no notice, that are adding to the resources of the country, by making articles that we have heretofore depended upon the Yankees to furnish us: . . .
               
Stocking Factory at Columbia, S. C.
               
Stocking Factory at Eufala, Ala.
               
Stocking Factory at Danville, Va. . . .
               
Knitting Needles at Columbia, S. C.. . .                

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 12, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
A Georgia Lady.--Mrs. Mary Arnold, wife of Wm. F. Arnold, of Coweta County, Georgia, made in the year 1863 one thousand twenty-eight yards of cloth, besides knitting several pairs of gloves and socks for soldiers gratis.  Who cares for Yankee blockades when we have ladies of such untiring energy and perseverance among us?  Three cheers for Mrs. Arnold.   
                                                         
                Lagrange Bulletin. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, July 26, 1864, p. 2, c, 1
A Manufacturing Town.—Danville, Virginia is becoming quite a manufacturing town.  The Register says:--"As a part of the machinery lately introduced into this town, we may mention an apparatus for knitting which has just been put up, and is now in successful operation.  It not being open to general inspection, we have not had the opportunity of witnessing the working of this machine, but we understand it is a valuable invention for saving labor, as it will turn out several dozen pairs of stockings per hour.  It is something new in this land.  The Yankees have heretofore worked the machinery for the Southern people, and no doubt this is one of their machines, brought hither to help along the needles of our good country-women of the South.  We may add, that we have now in Danville, established since the commencement of the wear, two large woolen mills, two factories for making cotton cards, a match factory, and a knitting establishment.  But there is plenty of water-power yet unemployed." 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, July 27, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
We were present for a short time at Colonel Sydnor's auction on Tuesday.  We saw prints sold for $8.50 to $9 per yard, which he assured the audience he had sold for $13.50 per yard one month ago, but which had been left with him for sale again by the purchasers.  The speculation was a loss of about $5 per yard in one month.  We noticed that socks were sold for $5 per pair, which Col. Sydnor stated were sold for $11 per pair only a week previous.  Boy's socks were sold for $3.40 to $3.70 per pair.  Girls hose for $6 to $7 per pair.  We were not able to see the end of the sale, but the prices paid leave no doubt that there has been a heavy decline in prices of late in Confederate money.  It should be borne in mind that we have none but the old issue.  But the truth is there is a great scarcity now of Confederate money.  There is every appearance that it will become more scarce before those who want it can get it.  The taxes for 1864 have not yet been collected but will soon have to be collected.  This should be borne in mind.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, August 11, 1864, p. 1, c. 2-3--long list of contributions to Ladies Soldiers' Relief Society.
includes 247 yds homespun, 20 lbs knitting yarn, 25 pair socks, etc.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, February 1, 1865, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                               
Headq'rs 5th Texas Field Battery,
                                                                                               
Camp Waul, Tex., Jan. 24, 1865.
               
Ed. News:--Permit me, through your columns, to tender the sincere and heartfelt thanks of myself and company to Mrs. Ernst, of Fayette county, and to Mrs. Cole, Mrs. Ball, Mrs. Elliot, Mrs. Ward, Miss Minton, Miss Bracer, Miss Burns and others of Austin county, who made liberal donations of socks to my company.
               
Ever keeping in remembrance this act of kindness, it also reminds us that patriotic ladies sympathize with the soldier in the field, which nerves and encourages him to deeds of valor and glory.
                                                                                                               
Chas. Welhousen,
                                                                                             
Capt. Com'g 5th Texas Field Battery.
 

DALLAS HERALD, March 16, 1865, p. 2, c. 1
               
We are pleased to learn that an effort is being made among some of our citizens to collect as many pair of socks as possible, to be sent to that noble body of Missouri troops under command of Gen. M. M. Parsons, now in Arkansas.  We hear of a number of ladies who are using their exertions in the matter, and with a prospect of getting up quite a quantity.  We are requested to say that all persons desiring to contribute socks, will have them ready by the 5th of April, and delivered to Eld. Chas. Carlton at this place, at which time Capt. Walden, belonging to the above command, will pass through here and convey them to their destination.