RECIPES AND HELPFUL HINTS

(Not including Dyes, Medical Assistance to the Military, Advice to Soldiers, Coffee and Tea Substitutes, Candles, Soap, Spinning, Weaving, Shoes, Knitting)

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], January 19, 1860, p. 1, c. 2
Cranberry Pudding.--Boil one pint and a half of cranberries cleared of the stalks in four ounces of sugar and water, until they are broken and form a kind of jam; make up a large ball of; cover it well with rice washed clean and dry; then round each fold a floured piece of cloth, which tie as for dumplings.  Boil them one hour; sift sugar over when served, and butter in a boat. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], February 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 2
Valuable Recipe for Dysentery--Take of peach leaves one handful, pour one pint of boiling water over them; then add one tablespoonful of Epson Salts.  Take a wine glass full every two or three hours till it operates freely; then take the tea without the salts three times a day until cured.  The tea must be cold when the salt is put.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 15, 1860, p. 2, c. 8
A teaspoonful of salt and teaspoonful of mustard stirred quickly in warm water and swallowed after any poison taken into the stomach by accident, will instantly act as an emetic.  As soon after as the stomach is quiet, drink a cup of coffee, clear and strong, or swallow the white of an egg.

               
A simple but very effectual remedy for biliousness, arising from any cause whatever, will be found in drinking half a tumbler of lemon juice.  It can be repeated, if necessary, and will put many a headache to flight.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], July 24, 1860, p. 2, c. 3
                Preserving Fruit.--As many of our readers will soon be engaged in preserving fruit, we publish the following recipe, which is furnished the Mobile Tribune by a correspondent:
               
Any glass jar, with a mouth large enough to admit the fruit, will answer the purpose.  Corks to fit may be procured at any of the drug stores.  Select the most solid ones, or those least porous.  When the fruit is properly cooked, fill up the jars with it and the syrup, and let them stand fifteen minutes.  By that time the fruit will settle down in the jars.  Then fill up the jar with hot syrup, and put in the cork tightly and seal it over with a composition of one-third beeswax and two-thirds rosin, melted together and applied with a small mop.  After the jars have cooled, fill up all the air holes that may be seen with more of the composition and put away the jars for use when wanted.  A light syrup will answer, as there is no danger of fermentation if properly sealed.  Crushed sugar makes the best syrup and is the cheaper in reality.  Jars made for this purpose, with good corks in them, may be procured at the crockery stores.  The jars should be tempered to prevent cracking, by putting into each but a small quantity of hot syrup at first.  A small blister can be seen on the sealing wherever any air has escaped.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, September 1, 1860, p. 3, c. 1
               
How to put up shirt bosoms.—We have heard ladies expressing a desire to know by what process the fine gloss observable on new linens, shirt bosoms, &c., is produced, and in order to gratify them, we subjoin the following recipe for making Gum Arabic Starch:
               
Take two ounces of fine white gum arabic powder—put it into a pitcher, and pour on it a pint of more of boiling water (according to the degree of strength you desire,) and then having covered it, let it set all night.  In the morning pour it carefully from the dregs into a clean bottle, cork it, and keep it for use.  A table spoonful of gum water poured into a pint of starch made in the usual manner, will give to lawns, (either white or printed) a look of newness, when nothing else can restore them after washing.  It is also good (much diluted) for thin white muslin and bobinet. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, September 8, 1860, p. 1, c. 7
               
Hard Butter Without Ice.—To have delightfully hard butter in summer, without ice, the plan recommended by that excellent and useful publication, the Scientific American, is a good one.  Put a trivet, or any open flat thing with legs, in a saucer; put on this trivet the plate of butter; fill the saucer with water; turn a common flower-pot over the butter, so that its edge shall be within the saucer and under the water; plug the flower-pot with a cork, then drench the flower-pot with water; set in a cool place until morning, or if done at breakfast the butter will be very hard by supper time.  How many of our town boarding-school girls, who have been learning philosophy, astronomy, syntax and prosody, can write an explanation of this within a month. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], September 12, 1860, p. 1, c. 1
                    Useful Information.--A friend furnishes us the following facts, which will not spoil by becoming generally known:
                Cotton clothing of children, and adults also, will not burn with a flame, if rinsed in Alum water.  A handful of alum to a tub of water is sufficient.
               
Water standing in cases, in factories and on bridges, will keep sweet in warm weather, and not freeze in cold, if a few pounds of Lime are stirred in each cask. 

DALLAS HERALD, December 26, 1860, p. 4, c. 1

Cakes for the Holidays.

                A lady correspondent of the American Agriculturist gives the following receipts for making good cake for the holidays:
               
Welcome Cake.—Stir a cup and a half of sugar and half a cup of butter together, with three well beaten eggs.  Sift a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, and half a teaspoonful of soda with three small cups of flour; this, with half a cup of milk, must be mixed with the above, and baked in a moderately quick oven.  By adding raisins and currents, ½ lb. of each, a very good fruit cake may be made.
               
New Year's Cake.—1 cup of butter, 1 of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar, ½ teaspoonful of soda, and caraway seeds to the taste.  Flour must be added till the dough is fit to roll—these require a quick oven.
               
Spice Cake.—1 cup of sugar, 2 of molasses, ½ cup butter, a teaspoonful of spice, and one of soda dissolved in a little milk; add flour till it is quite stiff; then roll thin and cut in cakes.   Bake quick.
               
Wealthy Cake.—Take ½ pound of butter, ¾ pound of sugar, the same of flour, 4 eggs, 2 lb. of seeded raisins, 1 pound of currants, ¼ pound of citron, 1 gill of brandy.  Spice well with nutmeg and ground cloves.  Bake slowly three hours.  This cake will keep six months.  Icing for the cake:  beat the white of two eggs to a froth, then stir in half a pound of powdered sugar.  Flavor with a little essence of lemon, and spread on with a knife when the cake is cold. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, February 20, 1861, p. 4, c. 1
               
Golden Pie.—Take one lemon; grate the peel, and squeeze the pulp and juice in a bowl—be sure to remove every seed—to which add one teacup of new milk, one tablespoonful of powdered starch, and the yolks of three eggs, well beaten; pour this mixture into a nice paste crust, and bake slowly.  Beat the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, and when the pie is just done pour it over the top evenly, and return to the oven, just to stiffen, not brown. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 4, 1861, p. 1, c. 6
               
Camphor and Flowers.—Two or three drops of a saturated solution of camphor in alcohol, put into half an ounce of soft water, forms a mixture which will revive flowers that have begun to droop and wilt, and give them freshness for a long time.  Let the fair ladies, whose most appropriate sphere is among the flowers, try the experiment.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 15, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
Keep Off the Moths.--It is usual, during the summer months, for dry goods and clothing houses, as well as private families, to use large quantities of camphor for the purpose of preserving their goods from the moths.  Now, as camphor is one of the most necessary drugs for medicinal purposes, and as our means for receiving further supplies are restricted, it behooves us to husband the supply now on hand, especially as many other and more plentiful articles will answer equally as well for the removal of these destructive insects.
               
One of our most prominent druggists has recommended us to suggest the use of Vanilla leaves, which grow in abundance in the neighborhood of Summerville.  Tobacco leaves are also an excellent substitute.  Either of these articles are just as good for the preservation of clothes as the more expensive article of camphor. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 24, 1861, p. 4, c. 2
               
How to Take Care of the Hair.--As to men, we say, when the hair begins to fall out, the best plan is to have it cut short; give it a good brushing with a moderately stiff brush, while the hair is dry; then wash it well with warm soap suds; then rub into the scalp, about the roots of the hair, a little bay rum, brandy, or camphor water.  Do these things twice a month--the brushing of the scalp may be profitably done twice a week.  Damp the hair with water every time the toilet is made.  Nothing ever made is better for the hair than pure soft water, if the scalp is kept clean in the way we have named.  The use of the oils or pomatums, or grease of any kind, is ruinous to the hair of man or woman.  We consider it a filthy practice, almost universal though it be, for it gathers dust and dirt, and soils whenever it touches.  Nothing but pure soft water should ever be allowed on the heads of children.  It is a different practice that robs our women of their most beautiful ornament long before their prime; the hair of our daughters should be kept within two inches, until their twelfth year.
                                                                                                               
Hall's Journal of Health.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, June 5, 1861, p. 4, c. 2
               
Water muffins.—Sift one quart of flour; add one teaspoonful of salt; make a batter with tepid water, putting first into the flour two teaspoonful of cream tartar; when just ready to bake, add one teaspoonful of car soda [sic?], dissolved.  Bake on a griddle, in rings. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 7, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
To Drive Away Mosquitoes.--Camphor is the most powerful agent.  A camphor bag hung up in an open casement will prove an effectual barrier to their entrance.  Camphorated spirit applied as perfume to the face and hands will act as an effectual preventive; but when bitten by them, aromatic vinegar is the best antidote.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, June 19, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Seasonable Hints about Personal Comfort.

                A thin shawl may be made warm by folding a newspaper inside of it.  The paper is impervious to the wind and cold air from outside, and prevents the rapid escape of the warm air beneath it.  Every one knows that the heat of the body is carried off much more rapidly in a high wind than in a calm.  The wind blows away the heat envolved [sic] from the body, but in a perfectly still calm this heat remains, and constitutes an atmospheric envelope so nearly of the same temperature with the body itself that the latter is not so quickly robbed of the natural heat.
               
A piece of silk oil cloth, stitched in the folds of a shawl, is more flexible than the paper, and will last a whole winter.  It has the advantage of securing inward warmth without the additional weight of a thicker garment.
               
When you set out on a winter journey, if you are liable to suffer from cold toes, which many people do in spite of "rubbers," fold a piece of newspaper over your stockings, which you can readily do, if your boots and shoes are not irrationally tight.  This is better than 'rubbers,' which are, in fact, very cold comforters in extreme, while they make the feet sweat in moderate weather.  The main use of India rubber overshoes is to keep out water, and for that they are second only to a stout, waterproof, first-rate calf-skin boot.  There is not a more villainously unwholesome article of wear made than the hightopped rubber boot.  It makes the foot tender, especially in children, gives an ugly gait, and when left off in any weather, the wearer is liable to catch cold.  Saint Crispin is the best friend of the human foot, when his leather and stitches are honest.
               
The constitutional vivacity and temper of a person has much to do with his endurance of cold, for his vivacity is a sort of nervous fire that lessons the sensibility to outward impressions.  An indifferent milk and water person, without energy and force, is at the mercy of every cold blast that sweeps the corner.  He, and especially she, has no defence but to wear a dozen shawls during the day, and sleep under a bale of blankets at night.  One without any mental purpose, (unfortunately there are such,) though in vigorous health, is much more liable to catch cold than a spirited delicate body bent on some positive pursuit. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, June 22, 1861, p. 4, c. 1
Interesting to Housewives.--Fly time is now fairly upon us, and these troublesome little insects are as much of a nuisance as the Black Republican army in St. Louis.  The weapon wherewith to repel this invasion may be found in the following, which we find in an exchange:
    
           Take three or four onions and boil them well in a pint of water, and then brush the liquid over your glasses and frames, and the flies will not light in smelling distance of them.  The receipt is a safe one, and will do no injury to your furniture. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, June 26, 1861, p. 1, c. 7
               
To Clean Glass.—Common newspaper is one of the best articles.  The chemical operation of some ingredient of the printing ink gives a beautiful polish.  Slightly moisten a piece of paper; roll it up and rub the glass; then take a dry, soft piece and repeat the process.  No lint will remain, as in the case of using cloth.
               
Bites and Stings.—Apply instantly, with a soft rag, most freely, spirits of hartshorn.  The venom of stings being an acid the alkali nullifies them.  Fresh wood ashes, moistened with water, and made into a poultice, frequently renewed, is an excellent substitute—or soda or salaratus—all being alkalies.
               
To Take Out Thorns or Splinters.—Make a plaster of turpentine and tallow, spread on a piece of leather and apply it to the wound. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, June 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
  A globule of belladonna, taken every morning, by each and every member of a family—adults, children, servants and all inmates—will prevent the spread of scarlet fever in every household that may adopt it, as certainly as vaccination will prevent small pox. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 4, 1861, p. 3, c. 4
               
Starch of Home Manufacture.--We commend the following recipe for making starch, to all who may wish to try it, it having been furnished us by one who has tried it, and who knows it to be a good one.  This starch will be found as good an article as that which comes from Yankeedoodledum:
               
Take a peck of unground wheat of the best quality; pick and soak it carefully.  Next put into a tub; pour on sufficient clear, soft water to cover it, and then set it in the sun.  Be sure to change the water every day, keeping it in the sun as much as possible, or an equally warm place in the house, should the weather prove unfavorable.  When all the grains of wheat have become quite soft, rub it well in your hands, and separate it from the husks, which must be thrown into another tub.  Let the soft wheat settle in a mass; and then pour off the water and put it on fresh; stir it well, and let it settle again.  Repeat this every day, till the last water comes off clear and colorless.  Then pour the water finally off.  Take the starch out of the tub, collect it into a thin bag, and hang it for a few days in the sun; after which spread on dishes or a sheet to dry.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, July 10, 1861, p. 4, c. 2
               
Making Vinegar.—To eight gallons of clear rain water add three quarts of molasses; put into a good cask; shake well a few times, then add two or three spoonfuls of good yeast cakes.  If in summer, place the cask in the sun; if in winter, near the chimney, where it may warm.  In ten or fifteen days add to this liquid a sheet of brown paper, town in strips, dipped in molasses, and good vinegar will be produced.  The paper will, in this way, form what is called the "mother," or life of vinegar.—Genessee Farmer.
               
Parsley.—Parsley may be preserved through the whole season, and in every climate, by the following process:  pull or cut your parsley when full grown, hang it up to dry, and when wanted for use, rub a little of it betwixt the palms of the hand, put it in the pot, and it will immediately resume its smell, flavor and color, although it may have been kept for years. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, July 16, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
               
Hard Butter Without Ice.—To have delightfully hard butter in summer without ice, put a trivit [sic], or any open flat thing with legs, in a saucer, put on this trivit [sic] the plate of butter; fill the saucer with water, turn a common flower pot upside down over the butter, so that its edge shall be within the saucer and under the water.  Stop up the hole of the flower-pot with a cork, then drench the flower-pot with water, set it in a cool place until morning, or if done at breakfast the butter will be very hard by supper time.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], July 20, 1861, p. 3,  c. 2
                Antidote for Intermittent Fever--Substitute for Quinine--Dr. D. B. Phillips, late of the United States Navy, now of the Confederate Navy, says:
               
"Raw corn meal unsifted and freshly ground, administered in doses of a large table spoonful six or eight times a day, or a tea made of fodder, is an admirable remedy in intermittent fever.--The yellow corn is the better variety, and a drink made of a table spoonful of the meal stirred in a glass of water and taken frequently, is not only a good remedy but a pleasant and refreshing beverage, which may be taken in all stages of the disease without the slightest evil effects. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, July 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 2
               
A correspondent of the Peedee Times recommends the Boneset (Eupatorium Perfoliatum) as a substitute for quinine.  It is a valuable suggestion; let our Lady Bountifuls see to gathering and drying it.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 16, 1861, p. 1, c. 6

Persimmon Beer.

To the Editor of the Charleston Mercury:
               
In response to your call, contained in The Mercury of a late date, I send you the following from the Southern Cultivator for March:
               
The best Persimmons ripen soft and sweet, having a clear, thin, transparent skin, without any rough taste.  A good ripe persimmon is a delicious morsel; most animals fatten on them; the chicken, duck, turkey, goose, dog, hog, sheep and cow, all eat them greedily.  The fruit, when mashed and strained through a coarse wire sieve, makes delightful bread, pies and pudding.  When kneaded with the wheat bran, and well baked in an oven, the bread may be put away for winter use in making Beer, and used when wanted.
               
The following is one of the very best receipts for making the Beer:
               
Sweet ripe persimmons, mashed and strained-------1 bushel.
               
Wheat bran------------------------------------------------1/2  "
               
Mix well together, and bake in loaves of convenient size; break them in a clean barrel, and add 12 gallons of water and two or three ounces of hops.  Keep the barrel in a warm room.  As soon as fermentation subsides, bottle off the beer, having good long corks, and place the bottles in a low temperature, and it will keep and improve for twelve months.
               
This beer, when properly made, in a warm room, is an exquisitely delightful beverage, containing no alcohol, and is, to the connoisseur of temperate taste, not inferior to the fermented juice of the vine.
               
The ordinary way of making it is more simple, and the drink is relished heartily by most persons.  A layer of straw is put in the bottom of the cask, on which a sufficient quantity of fruit, well mashed, is laid; and the cask then filled with water.  It should stand in a warm room, and if the weather is cold, fermentation will be promoted by occasionally putting a warm brick or stone in the barrel.  The addition of a few honey locusts, roasted sweet potatoes, or apple peelings, will make the beer more brisk.  Wheat bran always improves the quality. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, August 20, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
               
A Remedy for Killing Bed Bugs.—When the crevices are large enough, insert gum camphor, or make a solution of two ounces of camphor and one pint of alcohol, and apply in the cracks with a feather.  Follow up the application a few days and you will exterminate your disagreeable visitors.  In warm weather musquitoes [sic] may be kept at bay by keeping a cloth wet with camphor near the person.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, August 28, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
"T. A.," in the Houston Telegraph, says that a strong tea, made from corn shucks, has been used successfully as an anti-periodic, for the arrest of chills.  It requires several big drinks, at intervals of an hour.  Also, a tea of ripened seedpods of the common cockle-burr, he says, has also been used for the same purpose, when quinine failed to break the chills. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
Useful Hints to Planters' Wives.--Editors Rural:--The following recipes are at your service:
               
Corn Starch, or Farina.--Grate well filled green corn from the cob into a tub of clean water, say a bushel into each tub.  Let it remain a few hours, then strain the contents of each tub into fresh water.  The finest hair sifter or fine muslin must be used for a strainer.  After straining into fresh water, let it remain twelve hours or more; then pour off the water--the starch will be precipitated to the bottom of the tub, which must be spread on a clean cloth, and dried in the sun.  It must be kept stirred to prevent it from molding.--When thoroughly dry put it into glass jars.
               
Corn Starch Blanc Mange.--Take a teacup full of the starch, mix it up with cold water perfectly smooth; add this to a quart of milk which must be boiled, stir in the starch while the milk is boiling; it must be stirred while it is boiling to prevent it from burning.  Let it boil up once or twice, then take off and pour it into moulds.  This Blanc Mange must be eaten with loaf sugar and cream.--Any seasoning, such as lemon, or vanilla, can be used to season it; and if preferred the Blanc Mange can be sweetened while it is boiling.                                                                                  Mrs. W. P. W.
               
Auburn, near Laconia, Arkansas.
                                                                                                         
[Southern Rural Gentleman.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 30, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
The Virtues of Borax.--The washer women of Holland and Belgium, so proverbially clean, and who get up their linen so beautifully white, use refined borax as washing powder, instead of soda, in the proportion of a large handful of borax powder to about ten gallons of boiling water; they save in soap nearly half.  All the large washing establishments adopt the same mode.  For laces, cambrics, etc., an extra quantity of the powder is used, and for crinolines, (required to be made stiff,) a strong solution is necessary.  Borax being a neutral salt, does not in the slightest degree injure the texture of the linen; its effect is to soften the hardest water, and therefore it should be kept on every toilet table.  To the taste it is rather sweet, is used for cleaning the hair, is an excellent dentifrice, and in hot countries is used in combination with tartaric acid and bicarbonate of soda as a cooling beverage.  Good tea cannot be made with hard water; all water may be made soft by adding a teaspoonful of borax powder to an ordinary sized kettle of water, in which it should boil.  The saving in the quantity of tea used will be at least one-fifth.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 31, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
Chicken Fried in Batter.--make a batter of two eggs, a teacup of milk and a little salt, and thickened with flour; have the chickens cut up, washed and seasoned; dip the pieces separately in the batter, and fry them in hard lard; when brown on both sides take them up and make a gravy as for fried chickens.  Lard fries much nicer than butter, which is apt to burn. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 1, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
Hot Spice for Steaks, &c.--Three drachms each of black pepper, ginger, and cinnamon, seven cloves, mace half an ounce, one quarter of an ounce of cayenne pepper, nutmegs one ounce, white pepper one ounce and a half; mix; more cayenne may be added if desired.  This is a delicious adjunct to chops, steaks, soups, etc. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 7, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

For Curing Beef.

Prepare your brine in the middle of October, after the following manner:  Get a thirty gallon cask and see that it is quite tight and clean.  Put into it one pound of saltpeter powdered, fifteen quarts of salt and fifteen gallons cold water; stir it frequently until dissolved; throw over the cask a thick cloth to keep out the dust; look at it often and skim off the scum.  In about two weeks it will be ready for use and if kept in a cool, dry place and skimmed when necessary the same brine may answer to cure all the beef a family can use in the course of a winter.  For salting your beef prepare some large new tubs, bore holes in the bottom and raise them one or two inches opposite the holes that the bloody brine may run off.
                As soon as the beef has been cut into pieces of suitable size for packing, rub each piece well with good Liverpool salt--a vast deal depends on rubbing the salt into every part--sprinkle a good deal of salt in the bottom of the tub and when each piece has been well salted, lay it in the tub and be sure to put the fleshy side downward.  When the tub is full cover it over with a layer of salt and let it remain for ten days, then take it out, brush off the salt and wipe the pieces with a damp cloth; put it in the brine with a board and weight to keep it under.  In about ten days it will look red and be fit for the table.
                The best time to begin to salt beef is the latter end of October, if the weather be cook, and from that time by the use of the same brine (for the older it is the better) beef may be had in succession throughout the winter.

Another--For Curing Beef or Pork.

Water, one gallon; salt, one and a half pounds; brown sugar, half pound; saltpeter, half ounce; potash, half ounce.  In this ratio, the pickle to be increased to any quantity desired.  Let these be boiled together until all the dirt from the salt and sugar (which will not be little) rises to the top and is skimmed off.  The pour the pickle into a large tub to cool, and when cold, pour it over your beef or pork which has been packed after passing through the process of salting and dripping, a slight sprinkle of powdered saltpetre having been mixed with the salt.
                The brine may be poured over the meat two days after killing, but the brine will have to be drawn off and reboiled as often as the presence of bloody matter may render it necessary.
                In giving the above receipts a fair test, it will be well to bear in mind the importance first of securing the best article of brine that can be made.  It should be strong and free from every particle of dirt which will show itself on the surface in the form of scum which must be removed.  Before the meat is packed ready for the brine to be poured on, it should be allowed to remain in salt, with the fleshy side downward, until it has thoroughly dripped.  If the brine is tinged with bloody matter after it has been poured over the meat, it is evidence that the dripping was not thorough and the brine should be drawn off and reboiled until perfectly clear.  As long as anything remains liable to acidify there is present an element of impurity which will impart itself to the meat and will injure and perhaps spoil it.
                Hoping these suggestions will not be out of place and the information herewith communicated upon a subject, at this time, of very great importance to the country, may prove beneficial to the public, I remain yours, &c.,                                                               J. R. Galtney.
Bloomfield, August, 1861. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], September 10, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
We are informed that a ripe Dog-wood berry taken three times a day, just before eating, will cure ague and fever.  It wouldn't cost much to try.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, September 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
               
Tobacco for Disease of the Throat.—The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal makes the following observations in a review of Sir Benjamin Brodie's letter in the London Times, on the "Use and Abuse of  Tobacco:"
               
"There is a local effect of tobacco, when smoked, which we have not as yet seen mentioned, and which, in a therapeutical aspect, may be of considerable importance; we refer to its action in preventing that peculiar condition of the throat which, if neglected, is liable to terminate in follicular inflammation, or what is more properly known as clergyman's sore throat.  It has been said that few, if any, instances of this affection can be found to exist in those in the habit of smoking, and we know of one or two instances where it yielded at once to the potent influence of tobacco.  It most probably acts by allaying commencing irritation, which, if allowed to increase, would end in inflammation; and, perhaps, counteracting any spasmodic condition, of the surrounding muscles-— very natural source of trouble in this distressing disease." 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 14, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
Substitute for quinine.  Dr. D. B. Phillips, late of the United States Navy, now of the Confederate Navy, says:
"Raw corn meal unsifted, and freshly ground, administered in doses of a large tablespoonful six or eight times a day, or a tea made of fodder, is an admirable remedy in intermittent fever.  The yellow corn is the better variety, and a drink made of the tablespoonful of the meal, stirred in a glass of water, and taken frequently, is not only a good remedy but a pleasant and refreshing beverage, which may be taken in all stages of the disease without the slightest evil effect. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 21, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
Typhoid fever in the army.  Messrs. Editors:  Every day we hear the sad tidings of death among our boys in the army, from that scourge, Typhoid Fever.  A gentleman of the medical profession, now in our city, a citizen of Texas, expresses his surprise that the potent remedy of Spirits of Turpentine has made so little progress in the country for the cure of this ailment.  My friend Dr. R., a man of splendid professional ability, says that if any remedy can ever be called a specific, Spirits of Turpentine may be so considered in cases of Typhoid Fever.
                He begins with small doses of about ten drops every two hours, and continue the remedy in larger doses, giving as high as a teaspoonful at a dose, till the right action is seen on the skin.  Spirits of Nitre may be needed to relieve the stranury apt to follow the administration of turpentine, but nothing further is ever needed.--Atlanta Confederacy.
    
           We will add our humble testimony to the efficiency of this remedy.  During a serious spell of Billious fever, from which we suffered for several weeks, last summer, the use of turpentine mainly, brought us out safe and sound. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 27, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
                Removing sunburn.  If your young lady friends would like to know what will take off tan and sunburn, tell them to take a handful of bran, pour a quart of boiling water on it, let it stand one hour, then strain.  When cold put to it a pint of bay rum.  Bottle it and use it when needed.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], September 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 2-3

The Tomato Catsup Question Up--Who Will Settle It.

Editors Confederacy:  Having seen a call through your valuable paper for a receipt for making good Tomato Catsup, I send you one that I have tried for the last ten years, and it has proved good.  I have made and kept Catsup by this receipt three years, and found it as good as when first put up.
               
Take one peck of large, ripe tomatoes; having cut them up, put them into a preserving kettle; let them boil half an hour; then press and strain the pulp through a hair sieve; put back into the kettle and add one ounce of salt, one ounce powdered mace, half ounce powdered cloves, one teaspoonful of ground black pepper, the same of Cayenne pepper, and eight tablespoonsful of ground mustard.  Mix the ingredients with the tomato pulp, and let it boil slowly four hours.  Then put it in a tureen and let it stand until next day uncovered; when cold, stir into it one pint of best cider vinegar.  Put it in bottles and seal the corks.  It is then ready for use.
Yours respectfully,

Mrs. H. C. Holcombe.
Atlanta, Sept. 26th, 1861.

September 27th, 1861.
Mr. Editor:  I enclose you a receipt to make Tomato Catsup, which I have used several years, and have seen none better.  If you are fond of it, try it; I think you will be pleased with it.  I think many of our soldier boys would relish it finely, and their friends ought to make a double supply.
                                                                                                                   
S.V.H.

Tomato Catsup.

Have your fruit perfectly ripe; wash and mash it; boil it well; when done, strain it through a sieve, and to four quarts of the liquid, add one quart of good vinegar--apple is preferable--also, two tablespoonsful of ground mustard, two of fine salt, two of ground black pepper, two of whole allspice, one of cloves, two large onions cut fine, three pods of green pepper, and half pound of sugar.  Boil it to a proper consistency; then strain again, bottle and cork tightly.
                I will send you another which I prefer to Catsup, and no doubt would be much relished among our sick soldiers.
                    [You have told us how much vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper, &c., to use, but you did not say how much tomatoes.  We suppose you meant "right smart."--Eds. Confed.]

Green Tomato Sauce.

                Slice a peck of green tomatoes; sprinkle each layer lightly with salt; let them stand all night; next morning, wash them, and if too salt, let them stand a short time in cold water; take them out and let them drain; slice 12 or 15 large onions, put them with the tomatoes in a kettle, with 3 pods of green or red pepper, cut in thin slices; also, a half pound of white mustard seed, once ounce of ground allspice, half ounce of mace, two ounces of cloves, one ounce of ground black pepper, and half a pound of sugar.  Cover the whole with good vinegar, and boil rapidly until the tomatoes are done.  Then add two tablespoonfuls of ground mustard and stir it in well. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], October 2, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

The Catsup Question.

Messrs. Editors:  I see, in your last issue, some receipts for making Tomato Catsup.  I send you a bottle of catsup, which I hope you will do me the honor to try, and, if you think it worthy, you can publish the following receipt by which it is made.

Tomato Catsup.

To every gallon of peeled tomatoes, add 4 tablespoonfuls of salt, 4 of black pepper, 2 of allspice, 8 pods red pepper, 4 spoonfuls of mustard seed.  Bruise your spices and add to the tomatoes; then boil slowly three hours; strain it and boil it again, till it is thick enough, when you take it off, add one pint of vinegar to the gallon, and bottle.
                I also send you a jar of "Axejar Pickle," which I think would be more desirable for our soldiers than catsup.
                Try it at dinner to-day, and see if you can't agree with me.  It requires only vinegar enough to keep it moist, and could be sent without doing damage to any other articles in a box, which you know is preferable to other pickles and sauces, which require a quantity of vinegar to keep them.  If you would like to publish the receipt, I will send it to you with pleasure.
                Respectfully,                                                                         Mrs. S. B. Robson.
                Monday Morning, Sept. 30, 1861.
               
[The catsup and the Axejar are both very fine as we learn by testing them.  Please send us the receipt for making the pickle.] 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], October 6, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
    
           The willow bark, the bark of the root of the wild plum, and piperine, can be advantageously used as substitutes for Quinine. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], October 9, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

Recipe for Dysentery and Flux.

We have the following from Mrs. E. C. Jennings, of Oxford.  She is a highly intelligent lady--well known to us, and we place every confidence in her recommendation:
               
Take sweet gum bark and make a strong tea; to one quart add one gill of brandy and an ounce vial of laudanum, with a little sugar to make it palatable.  Take a teaspoonful until the disease abates.  I have known one dose to effect an immediate cure of the worst case I ever saw, and I know it to be a never-failing remedy.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 12, 1861, p. 1, c. 2
               
Receipt for Making Corned Beef.—A correspondent, whom we know to be a good housekeeper, sends us the following:
               
Sprinkle the beef with salt, and let it lie till the animal heat is all out.  Then for every 100 pounds of beef, take 4 quarts of salt, 4 ounces of salt petre, pounded finely, and 4 pounds of brown sugar, all well mixed.  Scatter some over the bottom of the barrel, and put down one layer of beef—over this sprinkle a portion of the mixture of salt, salt petre and sugar, allowing a larger portion for the top layer.  Proceed with each layer in the same manner, till the beef is all packed.  Keep it well covered with salt, and you will have corned beef, equal to Fulton Market.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, October l9, 1861, p. 4, c. 1
               
How to Wash Clothes.—Soak the clothes over night, or longer, in cold water, rubbing soap, with the hand, on the dirty spots; in the morning wring out, and put in a pounding barrel, the dirtiest at the bottom; on these pour plenty of boiling hot suds; pound them, taking off the top layers as fast as done, and you will find that but a few of the very dirtiest will need any rubbing whatever, and but little boiling.  In this way I usually get my washing all out of the way before breakfast Monday mornings, and though not exactly a pleasant recreation, yet the horrors of washing day are diminished fully one half.—Rural New Yorker. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 22, 1861, p. 1, c. 7
               
The willow bark, the bark of the root of the wild plum, and the piperine can be advantageously used as substitutes for quinine.  A Mr. Dance, of Texas, has made quinine from a tree common to our Southern forest.  The Houston (Texas) Telegraph thinks it is made from the prickly ash.  In its taste it has the same long, lingering, bitter sensations that quinine leaves. 

ALBANY [GA.] PATRIOT, October 31, 1861, p. 2, c. 2
A Recipe for Putting up Beef.--A Gentleman who has tried the following recipe warmly recommends it:
    
           Cut the beef into pieces of the proper size for packing, sprinkle them with salt lightly, and let them be 24 hours, after which shake off the salt and pack them in a barrel.  In ten gallons of water, put four gallons salt one pound salt peter half-pound black pepper, half pound allspice and a half gallon of sugar.  Place the mixture in a vessel over a slow fire, and bring it to a boil; then take it off and when it has cooled pour it on the beef sufficient to cover it and fill the barrel.  After the lapse of three or four days turn the barrel up side down to be sure that the beef is all covered by the brine.  If the beef is good, it will make it fit to set before a king.  The beef will keep good for a long time.
    
           During the scarcity and exorbitant price of Bacon, our readers might try the recipe, and test its virtues. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 1, 1861, p. 2, c. 4

Peach Leaf Yeast.

Hops cost $2 00 per pound, leaves cost nothing, and peach leaves make better yeast than hops.  Make it thus:  Take three large peach leaves and three medium sized potatoes, boil them in two quarts of water until the potatoes are done; take out the leaves and throw them away, peel the potatoes, and rub them up with a pint of flour, adding cold water sufficient to make a paste, then pour on the h hot peach leaf tea, and scald for about five minutes.  If you add to this a little old yeast, it will be ready for use in three hours.  If you add none, it will require to stand a day and night before use.  Leaves dried in the shade are as good as fresh ones.  As this is stronger than hop yeast, less should be used in making up the dough.  I have tried this often, and I am   
                                                          
A LOVER OF GOOD BREAD.
               
[We find the foregoing in the Richmond Whig of the 23d October, and would take great pleasure in commending it to our readers, if it had only told us whether sweet or Irish potatoes were meant.--Eds. Confed.] 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, November 2, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
Liquid blacking.  One pound of ivory black, three quarters of a pound of treacle or molasses, two ounces sweet oil, rub these well together and then add one pint of vinegar and one pint of beer. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 5, 1861, p. 2, c. 4. 

Directions for Keeping Sweet Potatoes Through the Winter.
by Samuel Johnson, of Desoto, Mississippi.

----

A good method of keeping them is to dig them, without cutting the potatoes, as soon as the leaves are bitten by frost, and the same day they are dug put them in a hill, which should be elevated six inches at the bottom above the surrounding earth, and also place under the hill a floor of boards and a heavy coat of cornstalks, on them, and the potatoes on the cornstalks.  As many as one hundred and fifty bushels may be put in a hill with safety.  Form the hill as near a circle as convenient, and also have it tall in proportion to its base.  Then cover it well with cornstalks, next a course of boards which are dry, and then a light coat of dirt, commencing with the dirt at the bottom of the hill and going half way to the top of it.  The hill should then be sheltered and well drained, eighteen inches deep, all around it.  Ten days from the time the hill is put up, cover it all over with dirt four or five inches deep, and if the winter be a cold one cover still deeper.  I have kept sound every year for eighteen years on the above method, and think it a good one for general use.
                I have known the potato kept well in a cellar under a brick house.  The house was twenty feet square, the wall twenty inches thick, and went into the ground two feet--the floor two and a half feet above the level of the ground, one half of it next to the fire place was tongued-grooved, the other half was made of plank as it came from the mill--the room over the cellar was used regularly the year round as a cook house, had two doors and two windows to the room above the cellar--the wall which surrounded the cellar had a few small air holes in it, which were left open until the potatoes went through a sweat, and were then closed.
                I have heard from reliable authority that the sweet potato has been preserved in a high state of perfection, the year round, in the town of Covington, Tennessee, by placing them in a cellar under a brick house, and filling, as they are heaped, with pulverized charcoal, and also covering them sufficiently deep to prevent the cold or heat from damaging them.  I am fully convinced that the small potato may be kept well, quite cheap, and kept in such a way as to undergo a small amount of freezing and thawing, and yet not be damaged by it.  If so, our army and navy should have the benefit of them, this coming fall, without fail.
                The method of preserving them, as last alluded to, is this:  take the potatoes, pile them, when dug, in a ordinary house, cover them a few inches deep with crab grass, then let them remain in that condition about ten days, at which commence and bake them in a good brick oven, having its heat just enough to blister the potatoes, but not so hot as to scorch them, laying only one layer deep of potatoes on the bottom of the oven.  Each oven full should remain in the oven from the time they are put in until it is cold.  After baking them, box them in shallow slated boxes, and they are ready for transportation.
               
Potatoes raised and saved as first directed, cost about twenty cents a bushel; yield an average of one hundred and fifty bushels per acre.  The cost of seed, cultivating, digging and putting up, about eighteen dollars, per acre; there are raised annually in the State of Mississippi perhaps three millions of bushels, and in North Mississippi, I think I may safely state, fully half of what are raised annually, rot from imperfect keeping; and as they are worth in every family fifty cents a bushel, the State loses annually, by not preserving them well, over a million of dollars, yet might, if they be kept with certainty by baking, be made an article of commerce in so preparing them. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, November 9, 1861, p. 4, c. 2
    
           Save your okra seeds.  Okra is the best substitute for coffee that is known.  Besides this, the okra plant will kill out noxious weeds, even coco, better than any other known means.  The okra plant makes a shade so dense, that nothing will grow in it.  Gardens that have been allowed to go to the weeds have in this way been cleared of them.  Fields may be in the same way.  An acre of okra will produce seen enough to furnish a plantation of fifty negroes with coffee in every way equal to that imported from Rio.  The green pods taken from an acre of okra and dried, would furnish the best thickening for soup in the winter, that could be made.  Okra is the most valuable plant that is raised.  Save your okra seeds.--Telegraph. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
Corned Beef.--A lady asks us how to cure beef for plantation use, as the "cattle upon a thousand sandhills are about to be sacrificed on the alters [sic] of secession."  An unexceptionable recipe for corned is the following, which we have always used:
               
"To every twenty five pounds of beef, put one ounce of saltpetre, one pound of brown sugar, and one quart of salt.  Molasses will do as well as sugar.  Rub the beef well with the mixture, and place it in a barrel, so that the liquor exuding from the beef will cover it.  Turn it every day, and in a week you will have fine corned beef.  No water should be used.  To preserve it for a long time, after a week, pour off the liquor, boil it a short time, until the scum arises, remove that, and when cold, pour it again upon the beef.  Beef so prepared will keep for many months, and be equal to the best "Boston Mess."  For family use, there is no better recipe than the above; for plantation use, a little more salt may be used.  Beef so prepared may be kept for a long time without becoming hard. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], November 28, 1861, p. 2, c. 2
                The manner of making potash in the most perfect way is this:  a quantity of vegetable matter is burnt into gray ashes, and the ashes boiled in water, so as to make a very strong lixivium or ley; after which, the ley, being previously strained, is evaporated over a quick fire almost to dryness, the matter remaining is put into an iron crucible, melted, and then poured on an iron plate, where, when cool, it appears in the form of a solid lump of potash. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], December 4, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

How to Cure Bacon with Little Salt

                To 5 gallons water, 7 lbs salt, 1 lb of sugar or 1 pint molasses, 1 tea spoonful saltpeter; mix, and after sprinkling the flesh side of the hams in the salt, pack in a tight barrel--hams first, then shoulders, lastly midlings.  Pour over the brine, and if not enough to cover, make another draft of the above and repeat till all is covered--leaving the meat in brine from 4 to 7 weeks according to size. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], December 18, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
                A respected correspondent sends us the following, which he says is a specific cure for Dyspepsia and all derangements of the liver.  The materials can be found in any drug store.  He says:
               
"It may be used with impunity for an indefinite time.  1 oz. of Liverwort, 1 do Black Root, 1 do Black Snakeroot, 1 1/2 do Senna.  Mix these several articles together, and put them in a large pitcher or any other convenient vessel, pour over them five half-pints (or a quart and half-pint) of boiling water, cover the vessel closely and set it away.  After steeping 18 or 20 hours, stirring occasionally during that time, strain it through a coarse cloth, and then add about a half-pint of good brandy, or some other good spirits.  Bottle, and in the summer or warm weather in the winter, keep it in a cool place to prevent it from souring.  Dose, a table spoon full three times a day, and always immediately after eating.  Some constitutions may require a little more, and others a little less; each one must adjust the dose to suit themselves.  There is no harm in the remedy, and if necessary it should be persisted in for weeks and months."         Philos. 

ALBANY [GA.] PATRIOT, December 19, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
The following receipts have been furnished us for publication by Mrs. Gen. Hansell of Marietta--a lady whose elegant accomplishments, and skill in all the departments of housewifery, will entitle her experience to the highest consideration.  They have come in a good time, and will be properly appreciated by the country at large: . . .

For Corning Beef or Pork.

                To one gallon of water, take 11-2 pounds of salt, half pound of brown sugar, half ounce of saltpetre; in this ration, the pickle to be increased to any quantity desired.  Let these be boiled until all the dirt from the salt and sugar rises to the top and is skimmed off.  Then throw the pickle into a large, clean tub to cool, and when *perfectly cold*; pour it over the meat, which must be in a tight barrel or box, which will not leak. After three or four weeks it is cured.  The meat must be kept well covered with the brine by putting something heavy on it.  The meat must not be put in the brine until it has been killed at least two days, during which time it must be spread out and lightly sprinkled with saltpetre.  Twenty gallons of water, 30 pounds of salt, 10 pounds of sugar and 10 ounces of saltpetre will fill a barrel.  The same brine can be used a second time by boiling and skimming it well. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], December 21, 1861, p. 2, c. 2

Valuable Recipes.

                The following recipes are furnished by one of the most experienced house-wives in our State, and we can assure our readers that they are good.
               
These recipes have been going the rounds of the press with a very material error in one of them, which we now correct--our attention being called to the mistake by the excellent lady who furnished them. . . .

For Corning Beef or Pork.

                To one gallon of water, take 1 1/2 pounds of salt, half pound of brown sugar, half ounce of saltpetre; [Here our correspondent says the following ingredients should be added:  to every half gallon you put in half ounce of Soda ash in two ounces of Carbonates of Soda.--Ed. Con.] in this ratio, the pickle to be increased to any quantity desired.  Let these be boiled until all the dirt is skimmed off.--Then throw the pickle into a large, clean tub to cool, and when perfectly cold, pour it over the meat, which must be in a tight barrel or box, which will not leak.  After three or four weeks it is cured.  The meat must be kept well covered with the brine, by putting something heavy on it.  The meat must not be put in the brine until it has been killed at least two days, during which time it must be spread out and lightly sprinkled with saltpetre.  Twenty gallons of water, 30 pounds of salt, 10 pounds of sugar, and 10 ounces of saltpetre will fill a barrel.  The same brine can be used a second time by boiling and skimming it well. 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], December 25, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
               
To restore faded parasols.--Sponge the faded silk with warm water and soap, then rub them with a dry cloth, afterward iron them on the inside with a smoothing iron.  If the silk be old it may be improved by smoking with spirits, in which case the ironing would be done on the right side; thin paper being spread over to prevent glazing. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 28, 1861, p. 3, c. 3
               
A certain cure for coughs.--A remedy never known to fail:  Three cents' worth of liquourice; three cents' worth of rock candy; three cents' worth of gum arabic.  Put them in a quart of water, simmer them till thoroughly dissolved; then add three cents' worth of paregoric, and a like quantity of antimonial wine.  Let it cool, and sip whenever the cough is troublesome.  It is pleasant, infallible, cheap and good. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 7

From the Fayetteville Observer.
Smoke House Salt—Home-Made Salt.

                Messrs. Editors:--As salt is exceedingly scarce and high you will please permit me through the medium of your paper to give a few directions respecting home-manufacture of salt.  Dig up the dirt in your smoke houses as low down as is very salt.  Throw a few bushels of this dust into a hhd., bbl., vat or  something of the kind.  Apply water and stir it up well and allow it to settle.  Then have you a stand prepared with clean sand as though you were going to drip them as you do ashes.  Then dip the water gently out of your hhd., bbl., or whatever it is, and pour it up in this sand to drip.  When you dip all out add more water and stir up again as before.  Do this until you get all the strength out of the dirt, then add more and proceed as before.  Dripping it through the sand will, I think, cause it to get clear.  It is an idea of my own, but I think it will answer the purpose well.—You can at the same time carry on your boiling and as you drip down through the sand keep adding the water to your boiler, and once a day boil down.  I think there can be plenty of salt thus made to answer the demands of the people at present or until there can be a supply obtained elsewhere.  It does not do well to drip the dirt at the start as you would ashes, because the water will not run through readily.  And to make it without dripping the water through; the salt is muddy; therefore, dripping it through the sand is suggested.                                                            MOORE. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Practical Directions for Making Bread.

To the Editor of the Charleston Mercury:
               
As most of the ingredients for raising bread, as yeast powders, &c., are becoming scarce, I think a good receipt given to housekeepers not out of the way:  Take about eight or ten middling sized Irish potatoes, pare and cut them very fine; then set them on to cook, with about three times as much water as will cover them.  When done, mash them fine in the same water, then add flour enough to make a thick batter.  Remember the flour must be put in while the water is boiling hot; let it then cool off until about lukewarm, and then add a little piece of sour dough, say a teaspoonful to start with.  Of course, after the housekeeper has once made this yeast, she can always keep a little of the old to add to the new.  If kept in a warm place it will be fit for use in about six hours.  Add plenty of this to your flour, and you will have the lightest and best tasted [sic] bread that you would wish for.
                                                                                                               
F. W. Claussen.
Claussen Mills, January 30. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 18, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
A Substitute for Milk and Cream.—Beat up the whole of a fresh egg, in a basin, and then pour boiling tea over it gradually, to prevent its curdling.  It is difficult from the taste to distinguish the composition from the richest cream.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], March 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

To Destroy Lice.

Messrs. Editors:
The following simple method for destroying lice, those troublesome little insects of the genus pediculus, has been frequently used by my mother with success:  Roast an egg done, mix only the yelk [sic?] with just enough lard to produce a salve.  Grease the head thoroughly, and in twenty-four hours, or less time, not a live louse or nit can be found.
                If you think this recipe will be beneficial to our soldiers, you may and should publish it in your paper.
                Very respectfully,
                ALABAMA.
Feb. 27, 1862. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, March 4, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Malone's Mixture for a Cough or Cold.—Take one tea cup of flax seed, soak it all night;  in the morning put in a kettle two quarts of water; a handful, split up, of liquorice root; one quarter of a pound of raisins, broke in half.  Let them broil till the strength is thoroughly extracted, then add that flax seed which has been previously soaked.  Let all boil half an hour more, watching and stirring, that the mixture may not burn.  Then strain, and add lemon juice and sugar to the taste.  Take any quantity of it cold through the day, and half a tumblerful of the above mixture warm at night.  The recipe is excellent.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], March 25, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

Corn Beer.

Take one pint of corn and boil it until it is soft, add to it a pint of molasses and one gallon of water; shake them well together and set it by the fire, and in twenty-four hours the beer will be excellent.  When all the beer in the jug is used add more molasses and water.
                The same corn will answer for six months, and the beer will be fit for use in twelve hours by keeping the jug where it is warm.  In this way the ingredients used in making a gallon of beer will not cost six cents, and it is better and more wholesome than cider.  A little yeast greatly forwards the "working" of the beer.--Augusta (Ga.) Cultivator. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Sore Throats--Salt as a Remedy.--In these days, when diseases of the throat are so prevalent and in many cases so fatal, the use of common salt is recommended as an effectual remedy.  We commenced by using it three times a day--morning, noon, and night.  We dissolved a large tablespoonful of pure table salt in about half a tumbler full of cold water.  With this we gargled the throat most thoroughly before meal time.  The result has been that during the entire winter we were not only free from the usual coughs and colds to which, so far as my memory extends, we have always been subject, but the dry, hacking cough has entirely disappeared.  We attribute this satisfactory result entirely to the salt gargle. 

DUBUQUE HERALD, April 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
                Rules for Health (a la Dr. Hall)--Imprimis.--Never go to bed with your feet sticking out of the window, particularly when it is raining and freezing.
                More than three pigs feet and half a mince pie eaten at midnight will not generally cause the consumer to dream of houris, paradises, accommodating bankers, and other good things.  At least, they are not apt to do so.
                Never stand in the rain barrel all night.  It checks perspiration, and spoils rain water for washing purposes.
                Never spank your children with the hand saw, or box their ears with the sharp edge of a hatchet.  It is apt to effect the brain.
                Never stand in the hall with the door open, with nothing but your he-mise or your che-mise on, talking to a friend more than half an hour at a time.
                To enlarge the muscles of the arms and legs, climbing up and down the chimney (especially if the house is a four storied one) three or four times before breakfast, is a cheap exercise and gives voracious appetite.
                Ear-ache in children is a common and vexatious complaint.  To cure it at once, bore a hole in the tympanum with a gimlet, and pour in oil and things.  If the child keeps on crying, bore it all the way through to the other ear.
                Corns may easily be cured.  The most torturing corn can at once be extirpated as follows:  Take a sharp knife; find the joint of the toe whereon the corn resides; insert the knife in the articulation; pry off the toe, and throw it away.  It will never return again, unless your dog brings it back to you in its mouth.--(Patent applied for.)
                Never allow your masculine children to ride a saw horse, as it tends to knock-knees and bowleggedness. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
Rice Cakes.—As rice is the cheapest kind of food we have, as well as the most nutricious [sic], the following from a correspondent of the Field Notes, will be read by every good house-keeper with interest.
               
While visiting the West India Islands, I became very fond of rice, cooked after this fashion:  they boil the rice in the usual manner and let it cool, then add a little water or milk to it, making it about the consistency of common buckwheat cakes.  Add to this a little salt and a handful of flour, and bake on a griddle as you would batter cakes and buckwheat.  An egg will help some by making them bake quicker.  Try it, housekeepers; I thin you will find it an excellent dish.  Any dyspeptic can eat these rice cakes. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 15, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Castor Oil.—The New Orleans Crescent has been furnished with the following recipes for preparing castor oil from the castor bean:
               
Strip the seeds of their husks or pods; then bruise them in mortars.  Afterwards they are to be tied in linen bags, and boiled in water until the oil which they contain rises to the surface.  This is carefully skimmed off, strained, to free it from any accidental impurities, and bottled for use.  Pressed castor oil is obtained like almond oil, by bruising the seeds into paste with water, and distilling the mixture, when the oil passes over. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Cut off the Back Legs of Your Chairs.

                I will tell you a secret worth knowing.  A thousand things not worth half so much have been patented, and elevated into a business.  It is this:
               
If you cut off the back legs of your chairs, so that the back part of the seat shall be two inches lower than the front part, it will greatly relieve the fatigue of sitting, and keep your spine in much better shape.  The principal fatigue in sitting comes from your sliding forward and thus straining the ligaments and muscles in the small of the back.  The expedient I have advised will obviate this tendency, and, as I have suggested, add greatly to the comfort and healthfulness of the sitting position.  The front edge of a chair should not be more than fifteen inches high, for the average man, nor more than fourteen for the average woman.  The average chair is now seventeen inches high for all, which no amount of slanting in the seat can make comfortable—Lewis' Gymnasium.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Make Your Own Salt.

                Editor Enquirer:  Having seen in your paper, a month or two ago, a statement that Salt in considerable quantities could be made from the dirt in old smokehouses, I have given it a trial, with entire success.  Being satisfied that n o one having a smoke-house that has been used for several years, need be personally uneasy about the price of salt for a year or two to come, I give you my experience as a guide for others.
               
I dug up earth, which I found by taste to be strongly impregnated with salt to the depth of two or three inches, and filled a flour barrel with it, first putting in the bottom a layer of straw and about six inches of clean sand.  Through this salty earth water was dripped, just as ley is made, and the brine was quite strong  and of a color much resembling pale ley.  This I boiled down until the salt solidified, and sunk to the bottom of the vessel, leaving but little brine, and that of a dark color.
               
The salt thus obtained is coarse-grained, and but little darker than that ordinarily used to cure meat; and I am satisfied that if the brine, before boiling, were dripped through a barrel of clean sand, the salt would be as white and clean-looking as the imported article.  My experience indicates that about a pint and a half of salt can be made from a gallon of strong brine, and I believe that at least ten or twelve gallons of such brine may be dripped through each barrel of earth from the smoke-house.                               M.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
               
Castor Oil.—The New Orleans Crescent furnishes the following directions for the preparation of this delicious beverage:
               
Strip the seeds of their husks or pods; then bruise them in mortars.  Afterwards they are to be tied in linen bags, and boiled in water until the oil which they contain rises to the surface.  This is carefully skimmed off, strained to free it from any accidental impurities, and bottled for use.  Pressed castor oil is obtained like almond oil, by bruising the seeds into paste with water and distilling the mixture, when the oil passes over.
 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], April 23, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Salt.

                Our fellow-citizen J. D. Matthews, Esq., exhibited to us a few days since, a specimen of salt manufactured from the dirt in his smoke-house.  It was apparently as strong as any salt, though not so white.  He informs us that the process is simple.  The dirt is thrown into a box or barrel, and water poured over it, as in making ley.  The drippings are boiled down, and a good article of salt is the result.  He made, he informed us, half a gallon from two bushels of dirt.

                Dr. Anthony, of Oglethorpe, also informed us the other day that he had tried the experiment successfully.

 

DALLAS HERALD, April 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
               
Substitutes for Soda.—A lady of Fluvanna county sends the following, which we publish for the information of housekeepers.—True Democrat.
               
To the ashes of corn cobs, add a little boiling water.  After allowing it to stand for a few minutes, pour off the lye, which can be used at once with an acid (sour milk or vinegar).  It makes the bread as light almost as soda. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 8
               
Substitute for Soda.—A lady in Fluvanna county sends us the following, which we publish for the information of housekeepers:
               
To the ashes of corn cobs, add a little boiling water.  After allowing it to stand for a few minutes, pour off the lye, which can be used at once with an acid, (sour milk or vinegar.)  It makes the bread as light almost as soda.—Exchange.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 29, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Bran Beer.

                Editor Enquirer:  Severe imitations of coffee and tea have been proposed, and they make a beverage pleasant to the taste and in this respect much resembling our common table drinks before the war.  But it is not pretended that they have the invigorating properties of real tea and coffee.
               
It is my purpose to suggest not an imitation, but a substitute for tea and coffee, which, if once fairly tried, I think will be adhered to by those giving it a trial.  It has the stimulating effect of coffee, and is exceedingly palatable and wholesome in its effect.  The article to which I allude is bran beer, which can be made quite strong and very cheaply, thus:  Take three quarts of wheat bran (costing three cents), pour on cold or hot water enough to soak it thoroughly, let it stand until the bran sours and rises (which will be about twenty-four hours), then pour on one gallon of boiling water and let it steep in a covered vessel until cold enough to strain through a cloth; strain it through a thin cloth, and let it stand in a pan or pail until the fine flour in the bran settles to the bottom; pour off gently, and to a gallon of water thus expressed add half a pint of molasses, bottle, and set it away until it ferments.  It will have all the life and pungency of ginger pop, and is the most palatable beer I have ever drunk.
               
It will take two or three days to prepare beer in this way; but by starting the process daily a daily supply can be kept up.  It will not cost more than six cents a gallon when molasses costs fifty cents.
               
The fine flour settling at the bottom of the vessel after the water is strained from the bran can be mixed with flour in making bread; and the beer made as above will make bread rise fully as well and as light as soda or yeast.
               
The sour bran will be greedily eaten by pigs. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
               
A Most Pleasant Summer Drink.--To the many thirsty souls in this city, and elsewhere, who suffer inconvenience from martial law, we recommend the following drink, which has not been inaptly called "Cream Nectar," as a thirst assuager, and at the same time a most refreshing and delightful beverage.  It is better than the best "snow drop julep" that was ever manufactured, and Sherry Cobblers cannot begin to compare with it in quality:
               
Take 3 lbs. white sugar, 3 ounces tartaric acid, and 1 quart cold water, put them into a brass or copper kettle, and when warm, add the white of 3 eggs; beat up with 3 teasponsfuls of flour; stir till it boils 3 minutes; when cold, add 1 gill of essence, and bottle up.
               
Directions for use.--Two dessert spoonfuls of the Nectar to each glass; then fill them two-thirds full of ice water, if it can be had, and add a little Carbonate of Soda. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 3, 1862, p. 4, c. 1
    
           The sun flower is highly beneficial in a garden or plantation in another respect--it absorbs the poisonous miasmata which fill the air and cause fevers, and thus--as has been proved by numerous trials--is a preventative of disease in situations where such preventive is peculiarly requisite.
    
           Every farmer and gardener should therefore make it a point to plant sun flower seed in great abundance about their premises, both from sanitary considerations and by reason of the value of the plant and its seeds to horses, cattle, and fowls.
    
           Nothing that is valuable should, in this crisis, be overlooked by our agriculturists.--Ex.
    
           SUBSTITUTE FOR SODA.--A lady of Fluvanna county sends us the following, which we publish for the information of housekeepers:
    
           To the ashes of corn cobs, add a little boiling water.  After allowing it to stand for a few minutes, pour off the lye, which can be used at once with an acid, (sour milk or vinegar.)  It makes the bread as light almost as soda.--Ex.
    
           WORTH KNOWING.--If those who have smoke houses, that have been used for some time, will take the earth floor, put it in barrels and leech it as they do ashes, then boil down the lixivated [?] water, they will obtain more than enough salt to pay for the trouble.  The writer knows of two instances in which the yield of one was ten sacks, and the other enough to supply a large family for a year.--Columbus Sun. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Home Made Soap and Starch.-- A lady sends us the following simple and useful recipe for making soap and starch:  . . .  All of my starch is soft hominy or gruel strained.  If you have not come to it yet, try it.  How much this war will teach us! 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 10, 1862, p. 5, c. 2
    
           Substitute for Quinine--The extremely high price of quinine renders it very difficult for persons of moderate means to purchase it, and yet it has been considered almost indispensable for the cure of our summer and autumnal fevers.
    
           The best substitute for it, (if indeed it be not equal to the quinine itself) may be obtained with all ease by taking the inside bark of the red dogwood (thought to be preferable to the white dogwood) cut it up fine and put it into a kettle covered with pure water; then boil it down to the consistency of molasses or jelly.  During the process of boiling it should be strained once or twice to free it from all impurities.  After thus being boiled down it may be put away in bottles.  When wanted for use, it can easily be made into pills by mixing with flour.
    
           The writer of this has known three cases of severe chills and fevers cured within the last thirty days, by taking a few pills of three or four grams each, in twenty-four hours, taken every hour.
    
           This information is obtained from an eminent Texas physician and chemist, who has thoroughly tested the preparation in his last year's practice--B.--Nat. Union. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 10, 1862, Supplement, p. 1, c. 2
               
Substitute for Quinine.—The extremely high price of quinine renders it very difficult for persons in moderate means to purchase it, and yet it has been considered as almost indispensable for the cure of our summer and autumnal fevers.
               
The best substitute for it, (if indeed it be not equal to the quinine itself) may be obtained with all ease, by taking the inside bark of the red dogwood (thought to be preferable to the white dogwood) cut it up fine and put it into a kettle covered with pure water, then boil it down to the consistency of molasses or jelly.  During the process of boiling, it should be strained once or twice to free it from all impurities.  After thus being boiled down it may be put away in bottles.  When wanted for use, it can easily be made into pills by mixing with flour.
               
The writer of this has known three cases of severe chills and fevers cured within the last thirty days, by taking a few pills of three or four grains each, in twenty-four hours, taken every hour.
This information is obtained from an imminent Texas physician and chemist, who has thoroughly tested the preparation in his last year of practice.—B—Nat. Union. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Smoke House Salt

A correspondent from Newton county gives us his experience in salt making as follows:
               
I put up a flour barrel full of dirt from the floor of my smokehouse which we have used for thirty-six years, dripped water through it, as we generally do with ashes, and when we got a pot full we commenced boiling, and repeated dripping and boiling, until we obtained from the one barrel of dirt at least three pecks of good, strong salt, through a little dark colored, and from the experiment I feel confident that I shall make enough from my smokehouse to salt my pork next fall.  The salt I made was about the color of the fairest kind of brown sugar; and I think, if boiled twice, might be made quite pure.  It has no unpleasant taste or smell.                           J. W. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
               
Home-Made Soap and Starch.—A lady sends us the following simple and useful recipe for making soap and starch. . . . All of my starch is soft hominy or gruel, strained.  If you have not come to it yet, try it.  How much this war will teach us!—Charleston Mercury.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 17, 1862, Supplement, p. 2, c. 4
                                                                                                               
[For the Gazette.
    
           Every man can make his own leather.  Mr. Editor, I wish to make known through your paper an important discovery, which I give the public for the good of the State.  How to get leather and shoes is a question one hears from every one he meets.  All who are in reach of cedar tops, have one of the best tanning materials in the South.  I have not tried pine leaves, but I believe they will do just as well as the cedar.  They can be gathered where the timber was cut last winter or green.  If the timber has been cut long enough for the leaves to be dry, the best way to get the leaves is to take a large sheet and pile the brush on it and beat them with sticks which will cause the leaves to fall off.  If you have to get them green cut off the limbs and then cut off or pull the leaves, &c.  Small twigs:  If you need the leather soon, you must boil the leaves; if you do not need it before fall, you can lay your hides away like you would bark.  The best way to prepare your hides for the tan is to use ashes and a little salt instead of lime.  If you use lime, you must get it all out, to make good leather.  If you have Sumac or bark you can mix it.
    
           "This is no Yankee humbug" that will cost from $50 to $500.  I wish every paper in the South to copy this,                                                                      J. R. SIMMS,
                                                                                                               
A Practical Tanner.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
               
A Most Pleasant Summer Drink.—To the many thirsty souls in this city, and elsewhere, who suffer inconvenience from martial law, we recommend the following drink, which has not been inaptly called "Cream Nectar," as a thirst assuager, and at the same time a most refreshing and delightful beverage.  It is better than the best "snow-drop julip" that was ever manufactured, and Sherry Coblers [sic] cannot begin to compare with it in quality.
               
Take 3 pounds white sugar, 3 ounces tartaric acid, and one quart cold water, put them into a brass or copper kettle, and when warm, add the white of 3 eggs beat up with three spoonfuls of flour; stir till it boils 3 minutes; when cold, add one gill of essence, and bottle up.
               
Directions for use.—Two dessert spoonfuls of the Nectar to each glass; then fill them two thirds full of ice water, if it can be had, and add a little carbonate of soda.
                                                                                                               
[Tallahassee Sentinel.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
A Substitute for Spanish Flies.--The present scarcity of Spanish flies for medical use in blister plasters, makes a proper substitute a desideratum.  A writer in the Savannah Republican says we have in this country many representatives of the same genus, and enumerates the blistering beetle, or potato fly, so prevalent in our gardens, and so injurious to vegetation, as efficacious.  He states:
               
The insect is of a dull, tawny or light yellowish color, with two black spots on the head, two black stripes on the thorax, and three broad ones on each wing cover.  The under side of the body, the legs, (excepting the first joint, which is yellowish), the antennae, or feelers, are black.  Its length is from 5 to 8 lines, its breadth of body 2 lines.  The body is quite soft.  These beetles are very shy, timid insects, and whenever disturbed fall immediately from the leaves, and attempt to conceal themselves among the grass, or draw up their long, slender legs and feign themselves dead.  In the night and in rainy weather they descend from the plants and burrow in the ground, or under leaves and tufts of grass.  It is, therefore, during clear weather, in the morning and evening, that they feed and are to be collected.  They should be killed by throwing them into scalding water, for one or two minutes, after which they would be spread upon cloth or paper to dry, and may be made profitable by selling them to the apothecaries for medical use. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
                Substitute for Quinine--The extremely high price for quinine renders it very difficult for persons of moderate means to purchase it, and yet it has been considered almost indispensable for the cure of our summer and autumnal fevers.
                The best substitute for it, (if indeed it be not equal to the quinine itself) may be obtained with all ease, by taking the inside bark of the red dogwood (thought to be preferable to the white dogwood) cut it up fine and put it into a kettle covered with pure water; then boil it down to the consistency of molasses or jelly.  During the process of boiling, it should be strained once or twice to free it from all impurities.  After thus being boiled down it may be put away in bottles.--When wanted for use, it can easily be made into pills by mixing with flour.
                The writer of this has known three cases of severe chills and fevers cured within the last thirty days, by taking a few pills of three or four grains each, in twenty four hours, taken every hour.
                This information is obtained from an eminent Texas physician and chemist, who has thoroughly tested the preparation in his last year's practice.--B.--Nat. Union. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 22, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

Watermelons.

                We hope our people throughout the country have bethought themselves to plant largely of this agreeable fruit, and we would strongly advise them to continue planting as they have opportunity, while the season permits a fair expectation of the melons ripening.  They will prove very refreshing and salutary to the sick and wounded in our camps and hospitals, especially in the absence of ice, of which we shall be deprived in most parts of the Confederacy.
               
Even in districts remote from the scenes of actual war, what might seem a superabundance of the melons need not be wasted, as excellent molasses can be made from them, and that is another article which will be lacking.  We have used molasses made from the watermelons, and found it very palatable.  The process of manufacture is simple, consisting in scraping out the pulp, pressing it in most convenient mode—in a gunny bag, for instance—and boiling the juice immediately as it sours very rapidly.  Good molasses is also made from the pumpkin, but we know nothing of this except from hearsay.  It would be well for agricultural journals to call attention to the subject, and describe particularly the process of manufacturing molasses from both these products, as well as from corn stalks.—Mobile Register.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
It is said that dried fruit put away with a little sassafras bark, (say a large handful to a bushel) will save it for years, unmolested by those troublesome insects that so often destroy hundreds of bushels in a season.  As there will be a heavy fruit crop this year, it would be well for farmers to remember this.--Rome Courier. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
Substitute for Quinine.--The difficulty of procuring an adequate supply of Quinine is causing attention to be directed to our native plants, possessing the same medicinal qualities.  A professional gentleman sends us the following description of one of these substitutes, which is no doubt valuable.  A fuller description of the tree would be acceptable, and also the different common names it is known by, as scarcely any plant or herb is known by the same name, in different localities:

From the North American Sylva.
Georgia Bark--Pinckneya Pubens.

                "This tree, still more interesting by the properties of its bark than by the elegance of its flowers and of its foliage, is indigenous to the most Southern parts of the United States; probably it grows also in  the two Floridas and in lower Louisiana.  My Father (Michaux) found it for the first time, in 1791 on the banks of the St. Mary's."  
               
"With a great affinity to the Cinchona, which yields the Peruvian Bark, my father discovered in the Georgia Bark sufficient differences to distinguish it as a new genus.  In testimony of gratitude and respect he consecrated it to Charles Cotesworth Pickney [sic?], an enlightened patron of the arts and sciences.

               
The Georgia Bark is a low tree, dividing itself into numerous branches, and rarely exceeding the height of twenty-five feet, and the diameter of five or six inches at the base.  It has been transplanted successfully at Charleston, S. C.  "Its inner bark is extremely bitter, and appears to partake of the febrifuge virtues of the Cinchona, for the inhabitants of the Southern parts of Georgia employ it successfully in the intermittent fevers, which during the latter part of Summer and Autumn prevail in the Southern States.  A handful of the bark is boiled in a quart of water 'till the liquid is reduced one half, and the infusion is administered to the sick." 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], June 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

To Make Black Ink.

Editor of Southern Confederacy:
Dear Sir--According to your request, through your Daily, for a receipt to make good Black Ink, I have the pleasure of offering to you the following, which is excellent:  1 gallon soft water, 1 ounce Extract of Logwood, and a half ounce Carbonate of Potassa.
Respectfully,                                                                                                         J. J. Cohen. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 3, 1862, p. 4, c. 1-2 (included for use by civilians)

Every Soldier his own Physician.

                Editor Enquirer:  Horrified at the rapidity with which our soldiers die in camp, we are tempted to give them the following recipes, the result of some experience, in hopes that some may be saved by using remedies simple, safe, and generally sure cures:
               
To Prevent Sickness.—Have a jug of salted vinegar, seasoned with pepper, and take a mouthful just before going to bed.  The salt and vinegar make a near approach to the digestive gastric juice of the stomach, and are besides antidotes to many of the vegetable and miasmatic poisons.
               
For Pneumonia, Colds and Coughs.—Take half a cup or less of the salted pepper vinegar, fill the cup nearly full of warm water, and then stir in a raw well-beaten egg slowly.  Take a mouthful every 15 or 20 minutes; in the intervals slowly suck on a piece of alum.  If the attack is violent, dip a cloth in hot salted pepper vinegar and apply it round the throat, covering with dry cloths to get up a steam, and do the same to the chest.
               
For Chills.—Put a tablespoonful of salted pepper vinegar in a cup of warm water, go to bed and drink; in two hours drink a cup of strong water-willow bark tea; in two hours more another tablespoonful of the vinegar and warm water, and so on, alternating, until the fever is broken up.  After sweating, and before going into the out-door air, the body ought always to be wiped off with a cloth dipped in cold water.  Dogwood will do if water-willow cannot be obtained.
               
For Measles.—Put a small piece of yeast in a tumbler of warm sweetened water, let it draw, and drink a mouthful every 15 or 30 minutes, and drink plentifully of cold or hot catnip, balsam, hoarhound, or alder tea; and use in place of oil or salts, one tablespoonful molasses, one teaspoonful lard, and one teaspoonful salted pepper vinegar, melted together and taken warm.  Take once a day, if necessary—keep out of the wet and out-door air.
               
For Diarrhoea.—A teaspoonful of the salted pepper vinegar every one or two hours.  Take a teaspoonful of the yellow puffs that grow round oak twigs, powdered fine; take twice a day in one tablespoonful of brandy, wine or cordial.  If these yellow puffs cannot be found, suck frequently on a piece of alum.  The quantity of alum depends upon the severity of the attack; take slowly and little at a time.
               
For Camp Fevers.—One tablespoonful of salted pepper vinegar, slightly seasoned, and put into a cup of warm water—drink freely and often, from 4 to 8 cupfuls a day, with fever or without fever.  Pour a cupful more or less of the salted pepper vinegar into cold water, and keep the body, particularly the stomach and head, well bathed with a cloth dipped in it.  Give enemas of cold water, and for oil use a tablespoonful molasses, a teaspoonful lard, and a teaspoonful pepper vinegar, melted together and taken warm.  If the pepper is too exciting for delicate patients, leave it out in the drinks and bathings, and use simply the salt and vinegar in water, and very little salt.
               
Antidote for Drunkenness:  for the benefit of Officers:  One cup of strong black Coffee, without milk or sugar, and twenty drops of Laudanum.  Repeat the dose if necessary.  Or take one teaspoonful of Tincture Lobelia in a tumbler of milk; if taken every ten or fifteen minutes it will act as a emetic; taken in longer intervals, say thirty minutes, it will act as an antidote.  The Yankees declared that poisoned liquor was put on the counters in Newbern to poison their soldiers.  Nobody doubts the liquor being poisoned, but it was made of poisons to sell to our own Southern boys; and it is horrifying to think of the liquors now being made down in cellars, of "sulphuric acid, strychnine, buckeye, tobacco leaves, coloring matter and rain water."  For the poisoned liquor, the best antidote is an emetic, say lobelia and warm salt and water, and then drink freely of sugared vinegar water.
               
For Snake Bites.—The best thing is one teaspoonful of Lobelia and ten drops of Ammonia, taken every few minutes, and a bottle filled with Lobelia and Ammonia, stopped with the palm of the hand and warmed in a panful of hot water, then apply the bottle to the bite, and it will draw out and antidote the poison.  Either of these, Lobelia or Ammonia, will answer without the other.  Tobacco, or Nightshade, or Kurtle Burr, or Deer-tongue, (a rough-leaved herb, in flower and appearance like to hog artichoke_ stewed in milk; drink the milk, using the rest as a poultice.  The last is an Indian remedy and will cure in the agonies of death.
               
For the Chicken Cholera, now devastating Fowldom.—Put one or two Jimptson or Jamestown weed leaves, properly called Stramonium, into the water-trough every day—fresh leaves and fresh water.  This is one of the triumphs of Homeopathy for we were just from a perusal of one of their works, and finding that the chickens died and made no sign of sickness, except holding the head down, we concluded the head must be the seat of the plague, and reading that Stramonium affected the brain with mania and stupor we tried it, and have not lost a chicken since the using.
               
If other papers will copy these recipes, they will save many lives, now sacrificed to the negligence of salaried physicians.  The  Eastern monarch's plan ought to be adopted, to strike off a certain per cent. of a Doctor's salary every time he loses a patient—that would soon stop the feast of Death!                      X.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, June 7, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
    
           A correspondent of the Lagrange Reporter recommends common ley, dripped from ashes, as a substitute for soda in culinary operations--two tablespoons of ley to a quart of flour.  He has used it thus. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
How to Manufacture Salt for Home Use.--Take a towel, or any piece of cloth--say, two yards long--sew the two ends together, hang it on a roller, and let one end revolve in a tub or basin of salt water; the sun and air will act on the cloth, and evaporate the water rapidly.  It must be revolved several times throughout the day, so that the cloth is well saturated.  When the solution is evaporated to near the bottom, dip from the concentrated brine, and pour it in a large flat dish or plate; let it remain in the sun until the salt is formed; taking it in every night, and placing a cover over it.  This is accomplished by capillary attraction, and can be manufactured for $1 per sack, on a large scale.  Each gallon of salt water will produce two and a half ounces of salt when evaporated.
                                                                               
John Commins, Charleston Tannery.
               
P.S.--To make salt requires a little patience, as it is of slow formation. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Salt from the Palmetto Root.--A gentleman, writing from Ware county, Ga., to a friend in this city, says:  "We have made an important discovery in this section of Georgia.  The palmetto root burned to ashes, and the ashes leached, and the ley boiled, makes an excellent salt.  Numbers of our citizens have tried it with the same results.  The salt is not as white as the Liverpool salt, but equally as strong.  We have, as you know, any quantity of the palmetto in Southern Georgia, and it has been useless heretofore; but now its value is unknown.  I have known for years that the ashes of the palmetto was salt tasted, but the discovery has lately been made that good salt could be made from it.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Blacking.--A correspondent sends us the following:  Fill a snuff bottle nearly full of soot from a common chimney, put in a good drink of whisky, and the same quantity of vinegar, shake it well, and you have a first rate bottle of glossy blacking. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], June 28, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Home Made Mucilage.--To the Editor of the Mercury:  A comrade being "hard up" for the wherewith to seal a letter, tried the gum which exudes so bountifully from the common old field plum tree, and found it to stick beautifully.  Acting upon his suggestion, and not being able to get Gum Arabic, I prepared a bottle of the gum plum, and find it to answer all the purposes of an excellent mucilage.  I herewith send you a small phial for trial, hoping  you will inform the people of this blockaded country, through your widely read paper, what an excellent substitute gum plum is for Gum Arabic.
                                                                                               
H. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, July 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
               
Spirits of Turpentine.—B. Tyson, a correspondent of the Raleigh Standard, recommends to the army the use of Spirits of Turpentine for colds, hoarseness, coughs, &c.  He advises that the turpentine be placed in a coffee pot, (or other vessel) and heated until it begins to send off a steam.  The patient should then take the spout in his mouth and inhale the steam until it causes his head to feel light and giddy.  His own experience has satisfied Mr. Tyson the remedy is a good one.  He also recommends that spirits turpentine be sprinkled in the tents as a means of preventing disease, and says he believes he kept off the yellow fever while in Norfolk, in 1855, by swallowing a few drops each day.
               
Blacking.—A correspondent sends us the following:  Fill a snuff bottle nearly full of soot from a common chimney, put in a good drink of whiskey, and the same quantity of vinegar, shake it well, and you have a first rate bottle of glossy blacking.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
Hints on Health.--A Yankee paper copies the following hints on health from Hall's Journal of Health, a very good authority in such matters.  If remembered and practised, they may save many lives:
               
1.  If a man faints, place him flat on his back, and let him alone.
               
2.  If any poison is swallowed, drink instantly half a glass of cold water with a heaping teaspoonful each of common salt and ground mustard stirred into it; this vomits soon as it reaches the stomach; but for fear some of the poison still remains, swallow the white of one or two eggs, or drink a cup of strong coffee, these two being antidotes for a greater number of poisons than any dozen other articles known, with the advantage of their always being at hand; if not, half a pint of sweet oil, lamp oil, or "drippings," especially if they vomit quickly.
               
3.  The best thing to stop the bleeding of a moderate cut instantly, is to cover it profusely with cob web, or flour and salt, about half-and-half.
               
4.  If the blood comes from a wound by jets or spurts, be spry, or the man will die in a few minutes, because an artery is severed; tie a handkerchief loosely around near the part, between the wound and the heart.  Put a stick between the handkerchief and the skin, twist it around until the blood ceases to flow, and keep it there till the doctor comes; if in a position where the handkerchief cannot be used, press the thumb on the spot near the wound, between the wound and the heart; increase the pressure until the bleeding ceases (but not lessen that pressure for an instant until the physician arrives), so as to glue up the wound by the coagulation or hardening of the cooling blood.
               
5.  If your clothes take fire, slide the hands down the dress, keeping them as close to the body as possible, at the same time sinking to the floor by bending the knees; this has a smothering effect upon the flames.  If not extinguished, and a great headway is gotten, lie down on the floor, roll over and over, or better envelope yourself in a carpet rug, bed cloth, or any other garment you can get hold of, always preferring woollen.
               
6.  If the body is tired, rest; if the brain is tired, sleep.
               
7.  If the bowels are loose, lie down in a warm bed, and remain there, and eat nothing until you are well.
               
8.  If an action of the bowels does not occur at the usual hour, eat not an atom until they do act, at least for thirty-six hours; meanwhile drink largely of cold water, or hot teas, and exercise in the open air to the extent of a general perspiration, and keep this up until things are rightened.  This suggestion, if practised, would save many lives every year, both in the city and in the country.
               
9.  The three best medicines in the world are warmth, abstinence, and repose. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], July 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
    
           To prevent flies from teasing horses.  Take two or three small handsful of walnut leaves, upon which pour two or three quarts of soft cold water; let it infuse one night, and pour the whole, next morning, into a kettle, and let it boil for a quarter of an hour.  When cold it will be fit for use.  No more is required than to wet a sponge, and before the horse goes out of the stable let those parts which are most irritated be smeared over with the liquor; between and upon the ears, the neck, the flank, etc.  Not only the lady or gentleman who rides out for pleasure will derive a benefit from the leaves thus prepared, but the coachman, the wagoner, and all others who use horses during the hot months. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], July 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
Cabbage Salad.--Chop enough cabbage fine to fill a vegetable dish.  Heat a coffee cup of strong vinegar, with a lump of butter in it the size of a small egg.  Pepper and salt.  When hot, beat an egg very light and stir in; then pour all on to the chopped cabbage. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
To Remove Maggots from Wounds.--As a matter of wide-spread interest at this time, we give place to the following:
               
Take the leaves, bark, flowers, or berries of the common elder (Sambacus niger), make a strong tea by pouring boiling water upon them, and letting them steep.  Wash the wounds once or twice a day with this.  Boil some lard, and, while boiling, stir in elder in considerable quantity, and strain off through a sieve of coarse cloth.  This makes an ointment for the same purpose.  It is improved by adding one-fourth as much common beeswax as the amount of lard used.
               
Antiseptic Powder.--To correct the offensive odors of wounds, mix one hundred parts of calcined plaster of paris and two parts of coal tar.  Rub well together.  Sprinkle this upon the wound once or twice daily.  They have been fully tested for years in the Bellevue Hospital.
 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], July 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Dried Fruit.

                Are our readers generally aware that there are much more expeditious modes of drying fruit than that usually adopted--sun-drying?  The simplest plan, though not most expeditious, is to construct an open kiln.  This may be done by digging two parallel trenches, on sloping ground, about 18 inches or 2 feet depth--two or two and a half feet wide, with a space between about one foot in width.  Over these trenches lay flat rocks, resting on the ground on each side, until entirely covered over.  Let the rocks be smoothly plastered over with clay, and chimneys left at the upper end, and openings at the lower end.  In these furnaces place dry wood, which will burn as it does in a brick kiln.  The clay kiln should be kept continually covered with fruit, which it will dry very rapidly.
    
           A better plan is to build a close house over the kiln above described, and have it full of drawers, among which the heat from the furnaces can penetrate and dry the fruit.  As we have not cut to exhibit the plan of construction, we shall not attempt a description of this sort of dry kiln.  A great deal of fruit may be dried on the open kiln, however, and persons having the requisite force can have two or three or half a dozen of them, as it costs but little labor, and n o money to construct them.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
To Destroy Flies.--Boil arsenic (say one-teaspoonful) in one quart of water one hour, then bottle it up, and put a little each day in saucers or plates, adding a little sugar, molasses or honey to attract the flies.  This ought to be renewed each day.  By boiling arsenic one hour, the water will dissolve one part in 40, while, without this boiling, the quantity dissolved will be only about one part to 600, or 800 parts of water. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 20, 1862, p. 3, c. 4
                To Remove Maggots From Wounds.--As a matter of wide-spread interest at this time, we give place to the following:
                Take the leaves, bark, flowers, or berries of the common elder (Sambacus niger), make a strong tea by pouring boiling water upon them and letting them steep.  Wash the wounds once or twice a day with this.  Boil some lard, and while boiling stir in elder in considerable quantity, and strain off through a sieve or coarse cloth.  This makes an ointment for the same purpose.  It is improved by adding one-fourth as much common beeswax as the amount of lard used.
                Antiseptic Powder.--To correct the offensive odors of wounds, mix one hundred parts of calcined plaster of Paris and two parts of coal tar.  Rub well together.  Sprinkle this upon the wound once or twice daily.  They have been fully tested for years in the Bellveue [sic] Hospital. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 23, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Rice flour.--This article is coming into very general use.  The Atlanta Intelligencer says:  "We have tried it, and, for batter cakes and waffles, there is nothing better.  Mix it with corn meal or wheat flour, and it makes excellent bread.  It requires much less lard than the common meal or flour used alone." 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], July 25, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

Rules for Health.

1.  If your clothes take fire, slide the hands down the dress, keeping them as close to the body as possible, at the same time sinking to the floor by bending the knees; this has a smothering effect upon the flames.  If not extinguished, a great headway is gotten, lie down on the floor, roll over and over, or, better, envelope yourself in a carpet rug, bed cloth or any other garment you can get hold of, always preferring woolen.
                2.  If the body is tired, rest; if the brain is tired, sleep.
                3.  If the bowels are loose, lie down in a warm bed, and remain there, and eat nothing until you are well.
                4.  If an action of the bowels does not occur at the usual hour, eat not an atom until they do act, at least for thirty-six hours; meanwhile drink largely of cold water or hot teas, and exercise in the open air to the extent of a general perspiration, and keep this up until things are righted.  This suggestion, if practiced, would save many lives every year, both in the city and in the country.
                5.  The three best medicines in the world are warmth, abstinence and repose. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
                A Most Pleasant Summer Drink--"Cream Nectar."--Take three pounds white sugar, three ounces tartaric acid, and one quart cold water, put them in a brass or copper kettle, and when warm add the white of three eggs; beat up with three teaspoonful of flour; stir till it boils for three minutes; when cold, add one gill of essence and bottle up.
                Directions for Use.--Two desert spoonfuls of the nectar to each glass; then fill them two-thirds full of ice water, if it can be had, and add a little carbonate of soda. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 29, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
Home Made Starch.--A correspondent of the Mobile Register gives the following recipe for making starch:
               
In the present state of the corn as good starch can be made of it as any housewife needs.  Grate it from the ear; mix the pulp thoroughly with cold water, and strain it through a sieve.  Let the liquor settle, and, pouring off the water, which will be discolored, the starch will be found at the bottom of the vessel in a rather soft cake, pour on more water, stir it up, and repeat the process.  At each repetition the cake will be found firmer, and when the water comes off clear, and the starch is free from a pink or yellow tinge on the top, the process is complete, except drying.  I never knew but one miscarriage, and that was in very warm weather, when the water was not cold enough, or was allowed to stand too long, and the mass fermented.  A grater can be made from an old coffee pot or tin bucket, by punching it (outwards) full of holes--a hammer and nail will answer the purpose--and taking it to a piece of board. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 29, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
To Destroy Weevils in Rice.--Mr. Editor:  As the question of food is all important now, the following plan for killing weevils and preventing their future hatching in rice I have found efficacious:  Put the rice in a moderately tight room, and burn about ten pounds of flour of brimstone in a large iron pot.  This will kill every weevil without injuring the rice.
    Yours, &c.,                            H.S.
                                Constitutionalist, 25th July. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, July 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
Rice Flour.  This article is coming into very general use.  The Atlanta Intelligencer says:  We have tried it, and for battercakes and waffles, there is nothing better.  Mix it with corn meal or wheat flour, and it makes excellent bread.  It requires much less lard than the common meal or flour used alone.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
Flesh Wounds.--The following recipe for flesh wounds has proved very efficacious, and is recommended to the Medical Faculty as an experiment.  It has been practically tested by an officer in the French army, who was wounded in the arm, and in the space of eight days his wound was healed.  It is worth a trial:
               
Take a linen rag, in which cut small holes throughout, dip it in camphor oil, and apply it to the wounded parts.  Take finely powdered camphor and sprinkle over the linen--a piece of lint in camphor salve should then be applied over the wound.  Bandage the part wounded, and apply twice or three times a day. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, August 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
               
Home-Made Starch.—Messrs. Editors:  In the present state of the corn as good starch can be made of it as any housewife needs.  Grate it from the ear; mix the pulp thoroughly with cold water, and strain it through a sieve.  Let the liquor settle, and, pouring off the water, which will be discolored, the starch will be found at the bottom of the vessel in a rather soft cake.  Pour on more water, stir it up, and repeat the process.  At each repetition the cake will be found firmer, and when the water comes off clear, and the starch is free from a pink or yellow tinge on the top, the process is complete, except drying.  IL never knew but one miscarriage, and that was in warm weather, when the water was not cold enough, or was allowed to stand too long, and the mass fermented.  A grater can be made from an old coffee pot or tin bucket by punching it (outwards) full of holes—a hammer and nail will answer the purpose—and tacking it to a piece of board.                                                                   Economy.
                                                                               
[Mobile Evening News, 14th.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, August 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
A Fig for Molasses.  We have received from Mr. C. H. Owen, 65 Coming street, a specimen of good Molasses, made from the white fig.  He made from one peck of figs, three pints; and from a bushel, seven quarts of this molasses, according to the following directions:
                Wash the figs, then put them in a porcelain vessel; cover with pure water, boil carefully one hour.  When cool, strain through a muslin cloth; then boil again until it is boiled down to a proper consistency, which you can easily tell by dipping by a spoonful and cooling.  The above is all the preparation necessary.  In boiling for the last time, take off the scum.--Charleston Courier. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 9, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

A Virginia Stew.

Take two young Chickens, cut them up and par-boil them--then peel and cook one quart Irish Potatoes; then peel and cut up one dozen large, ripe Tomatoes; then cut the corn from one dozen soft Roasting Ears, and mash it up; add to these one large Onion, cut up fine.  Put all in a stew pan and stew for two hours, stirring frequently to prevent burning.  Extract the bones of the fowl; season with salt, butter and pepper, and serve hot.  If after a fair trial you pronounce this an unpalatable dish, then your loyalty to the "Southern Confederacy" ought to be seriously questioned! 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, August 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

No Use for Quinine.

                Editor Mississippian:  I beg to make public, through the medium of your paper, the following certain and thoroughly tried cure for ague and fever:  1 pint of cotton seed, 2 pints of water boiled down to one of tea—taken warm one hour before the expected attack.  Many persons will doubtless laugh at this simple remedy, but I have tried it effectually, and unhesitatingly say it is better than quinine, and could I obtain the latter article at a dime a bottle, I would infinitely prefer the cotton seed tea.  It will not only cure, invariably, but permanently, and is not at all unpleasant to the taste.
                                                                                               
Yours, truly, &c.
                                                               
                                                H.  G. D. Brown,
                                                                                                                       
Copiah county, Miss.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Portable Soup.--Let veal or beef soup get quite cold, then skim off every particle of fat; boil it till of a thick glutinous consistence.  Care should be taken not to have the soup burn.  Season it very highly with pepper, salt, mace, and cloves; and a little brandy or wine, and pour it over earthen platters, not more than a quarter-inch in thickness; let it be till cold, then cut in three inch square pieces; set them in the sun to dry, often turning them.  When very dry, place them in tin or earthen vessels, having a layer of white paper between each layer of cakes.  These directions, if they are carefully attended to, will keep good for a long time.  Whenever you wish to make a soup of them, you have only to put a quart of water to one cake, and make the water piping hot.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
                Blacking.--A correspondent sends one of our contemporaries the following:
                Fill a snuff bottle nearly full of soot, from a common chimney, put in a good drink of whisky, and the same quantity of vinegar, shake it well, and you have a firstrate [sic] bottle of glossy blacking.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, August 23, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
               
Substitute for Soda.—A lady of Fluvanna county sends us the following, which we publish for the information of housekeepers:--Ex. 
               
To the ashes of corn cobs add a little boiling water.  After allowing it to stand for a few minutes, pour off the lye, which can be used at once with an acid (sour milk or vinegar).  It makes the bread as slight as soda.
               
Our lady readers in the country should cut this out and remember it.  They can avail themselves of corn cobs it will be perceived any moment and with scarcely any trouble at all. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, August 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
               
A Great Remedy for Coughs.—Just aw we were convalescing from our recent illness, we took a very severe cough, which used us quite seriously.  Quite a number of remedies having failed to arrest it, a friend sent us a bottle of the syrup of "Life-Everlasting," which soon had the desired effect, and we take pleasure in recommending it to persons troubled with coughs or weak lungs.  The "Life-Everlasting" is a weed commonly known and easily obtained in Florida and the southern part of Georgia.  You boil the leaves to a strong liquid, and put the liquid in syrup, then boil the syrup to a proper thickness, and it is ready for use.  Honey will do as well as syrup.
               
Gainesville [Fla.] Cotton Planter, 9th.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, August 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
                No Use for Quinine.--Ed. Mississippian:  I beg to make public through the medium of your paper, the following certain and thoroughly tried cure for ague and fever:  1 pint of cotton seed, 2 parts of water boiled down to one of tea, taken warm one hour before the expected attack.  Many persons will doubtless laugh at this simple remedy, but I have tried it effectually, and unhesitatingly say it is better than quinine, and could I obtain the latter article at a dime a bottle I would infinitely prefer the cotton seed tea.  It will not only cure, invariably, but permanently, and is not at all unpleasant to the taste.
                                                    Yours truly, &c.
                                                                               
H. G. D. Brown, Copish co., Miss. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], August 28, 1862, p.  1, c. 6
Watermelon.--Cucurbita Citrullus:  The seeds of watermelon are employed, to a considerable extent, as a remedy in strangury and other affections of the urinary passages, and they are also highly esteemed by many experienced physicians as a valuable diuretic.  They are given in infusion, made with one or two ounces of the bruised seeds to a pint of boiling water and taken when cold ad libitum.
                As this is the season when watermelons are abundant, would it not be well for all families to secure a sufficient supply of the seeds for medicinal purposes.  To preserve them, dry them in the sun for two days taking them in at night. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Receipts for Making Bread, &c., from Rice Flour.
Russell County, Ala., Sept. 8.

Eds. Sun:  I read an article in one of your papers lately in which receipts for making different kinds of bread with rice flour, were inquired for and having a few that I think will be found good, I send them to you.  They were printed in Charleston, S. C., several years ago.
                                                                    Respectfully, Elizabeth B. Lewis.
                To Make Loaf Rice Bread.--Boil a pint of rice soft, and a pint of leaven, then three quarts of rice flour, put it to raise in a tin or earthen vessel, until it has risen sufficiently; divide it into three parts and bake it as other bread, and you will have three large loaves.  Or scald the flour, and when cold, mix half wheat flour or corn meal, raised with leaven in the usual way.
                Another.--One quart of rice flour:  make it into a stiff pap, by wetting with warm water, not so hot as to make it lumpy, when well wet add boiling water, as much as two or three quarts, stir continually until it boils; put in 1/2 pint of yeast when it cools, and a little salt, knead as much wheat flour as will make it a proper dough for bread, put it to rise, and when it has risen add a little more wheat flour; let it stand in a warm place half an hour, and bake it.  This same mixture only made thinner and baked in rings make excellent muffins.
                Journey of [or?] Jonny [sic] Cake.--To three spoonfuls of soft boiled rice, add a small tea-cup of water or milk, then add six spoonfuls of rice flour, which will make a large Jonny cake, or six waffles.
                Rice Cakes.--Take a pint of soft boiled rice, a half pint of milk or water, to which add twelve spoonfuls of the rice flour; divide it into small cakes and bake them in a brick oven.
                Rice Cakes Like Buckwheat.--Mix one-fourth wheat flour to three-fourths superfine rice flour, and raise it as buckwheat flour, bake it like buckwheat cakes.
                To Make Wafers.--Take a pint of warm water, a teaspoonful of salt, add a pint of the flour, and it will give you two dozen wafers.
                To Make Rice Puffs.--To a  pint of the flour add a teaspoonful of salt, a pint of boiling water, beat up four eggs, stir them well together, put from two to three spoonfuls of lard in a pan, make it boiling hot, and fry as you do common fritters.
                To Make a Rice Pudding.--Take a quart of milk, add a pint of the flour, boil them to a pap, beat up six eggs, to which add six spoonfuls of Havana sugar, and a spoonful of butter, which when well beaten together, add to the milk and flour, grease the pan it is to be baked in, grate nutmeg over the mixture and bake it.
                Rice Flour Sponge Cake.--Made like sponge cake except that you use 3/4 of a pound of rice flour, thirteen eggs, leaving out four whites, and add a little salt.
                Rice Flour Blance [sic] Mange.--Boil one quart of milk, season it to your taste with sugar and rose water, take four tablespoonfuls of the rice flour, mix it very smooth with cold milk, add this to the other milk while it is boiling, stirring it well; let all boil together about fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally; then pour it into moulds and put it by to cool.  This is a very favorite article for invalids.
                Rice Griddle Cakes.--Boil one large cup of whole cold rice quite soft in milk, and while hot stir in a little wheat flour or rice flour; when cold add two eggs and a little salt, bake in small thin cakes on the griddle.
                In every case in making rice flour bread, cake or pudding, a well boiled pap should be first made of all the milk and water and half the flour, and allowed to get perfectly cold before the other ingredients are added; it forms a support for them and prevents the flour from settling at the bottom; stir the whole a moment before it is set to cook. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
                Substitute for Soda--A lady of Fluvanna county sends us the following, which we publish for the information of housekeepers.—
                To the ashes of corn cobs add a little boiling water.  After allowing it to stand for a few minutes, pour off the lye, which can be used at once with an acid (sour milk or vinegar.)  It makes the bread as light as soda.
                Our lady friends in the country should cut this out and remember it.  They can avail themselves of corn cobs, it will be perceived any moment, and with scarcely any trouble at all.--Savannah Republican.
[phrasing?--as written] 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Corn Meal.

                In reply to the offer of the Weekly Telegraph, to the person who would furnish us with the greatest number of ways that corn meal can be served up as an article of food, we have received the following, and a young lady in Independence gets the "Weekly."  Who will now say that we cannot dispense with flour altogether?
    
           Corn Crisp--Take one pint of meal, one tablespoon of lard, a little salt and water--spread it upon a board thin, and bake it before the fire; turn it with a string or knife.
    
           Ash Corn Cake--Mix up meal with water and a little salt; wrap it up in corn shucks or a collard leave, and bake it in hot ashes.
    
           Hoe Cake.--Mix up meal and water, and bake on a hoe.
    
           Corn Meal Ginger Cake.--Take one pint of meal, three eggs, one cup of molasses, one tablespoon of lard or butter, and ginger, or any other spices to suit your taste.
    
           Johnny Cake--Take equal quantities of sweet potatoes (boiled) and corn meal--mix with salt and lard--and bake it over or on a board before the fire.
                Corn Meal Cakes--Stir to a cream a pound and a quarter of brown sugar, a pound of butter, beat six eggs and mix them with the sugar and butter; add a teaspoonful of cinnamon or ginger; stir in a pound and three quarters of corn meal, bake in small cakes and let it remain till cold.
    
           Corn Cakes--One quart of milk, one teaspoonful of saleratus, two eggs and corn meal sufficient to make a batter of the consistency of pan-cakes.  Bake quick--pans buttered--and eat warm.
    
           Corn Bread--Take six pints of corn meal, one tablespoonsful of salt, four pints of water, mix with the hand and bake in oblong rolls two inches long--make half an hour before baking; use hot water in winter.
    
           Light Corn Bread--Stir four pints of meal in three pints of warm water--add one teaspoonful of salt, let it rise five or six hours, then stir it with the hand and bake it in a brick oven.
    
           Another method is to make mush, and before it grows cold, stir in a half pint of meal--let it rise and bake as the first.
    
           Corn Cakes--Six eggs well beaten; one pint of milk; one teaspoonful salt; two pints of mush, almost cold; two pints of meal and three tablespoonfuls of melted lard; grease the oven; put one large spoonful of batter in each cake.  Do not let them touch in baking.
    
           Corn Muffins.--Made in the same way as the above. Grease the muffling [sic?] hoops, and heat the oven slightly before putting in either corn cakes or muffins.
    
           Butter or Corn Cake.--Beat the yoke of three eggs very light; add one pint of milk, two pints of much almost cold; one teaspoonful of salt; three teaspoonsful of melted butter.  To be well beaten together.  Before frying them, ship the whites of the eggs to a strong froth, and stir in thoroughly in the batter.  For trying all kinds of batter cakes, use no more lard than is necessary to make them turn well.
    
           Mush--Two pints of water in a pot to boil, then take one pint of cold water and mix smoothly into a pint of meal.  When the water in the pot boils, stir this well into it and let it boil for ten or fifteen minutes, or until it looks clear.
    
           Virginia Corn Bread--Dissolve one tablespoonful of butter in three and a half pints of boiling milk; into this scald one quarter of corn meal; when cool, add a half pint of wheat flour, a little sugar, a teaspoonful of salt, and two eggs well beaten, mix well together, and bake in two cakes, tins well greased or buttered.
    
           Brown bread.--Mix three parts of corn meal and two parts of rye flour; sift and wet down with sweetened hot water; a little saleratus and yeast; work into a stiff pudding.  Bake with a steady, strong heat until well done.
    
           Corn Bread.--To three pints of milk add as much corn meal as will make a thin batter, three eggs, two tablespoonsful of butter, a teaspoonful of saleratus, and salt to suit the taste.  If not to be had the bread is good without the eggs.
    
           Corn Oysters.--Take three dozen ears of large young corn, six eggs, lard and butter in equal portions for frying.  The corn must be young and soft.  Grate it from the cob as fine as possible, and dredge it with flour.  Beat very lengthy the six eggs, and mix them gradually with the corn.  Then let the whole be incorporated by hard beating, add a teaspoonful of salt.--Telegraph. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 20, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Directions for the Use of Rice Flour

                The following recipes for making different kinds of bread, with rice flour, were published many years ago in Charleston, and are vouched for as being valuable:
               
To Make Loaf Rice Bread.--Boil a pint of rice soft, and a pint of leaven, then three quarts of rice flour, put it to raise in a tine or earthen vessel, until it has risen sufficiently; divide it into three parts, and bake it as other bread, and you will have three large loaves.  Or scald the flour, and when cold, mix half wheat flour or corn meal, raised with leaven in the usual way.
               
Another.--One quart of rice flour--make it into a stiff pap, by wetting with warm water, not so hot as to make it lumpy; when well wet add boiling water, as much as two or three quarts, stir it continually until it boils, put in 1/2 pint of yeast when it cools, and a little salt, knead as much wheat flour as will make it a proper dough for bread, put it to rise, and then add a little more wheat flour--let it stand in a warm place half an hour, and bake it.  This same mixture only made thinner and baked in rings make excellent muffins.
               
Journey or Jonny [sic] Cake.--To three spoonsful of soft boiled rice, add a small tea cup of water or milk, then add six spoonsful of rice flour, which will make a large Jonny cake, or six waffles.
               
Rice Cakes.--Take a pint of soft boiled rice, a half a pint of milk or water, to which add twelve spoonsful of the rice flour, divide it into small cakes and bake them in a brick oven.
               
Rice Cakes Like Buckwheat.--Mix one-fourth wheat flour to three-fourths superfine rice flour, and raise it as buckwheat flour, bake it like buckwheat cakes.
               
To Make Wafers.--Take a pint of warm water, a teaspoonful of salt, add a pint of the flour, and it will give you two dozen wafers.
               
To Make Rice Puffs.--To a pint of the flour, add a teaspoonful of salt, a pint of boiling water, best up four eggs, stir them well together, put from two to three spoonsful of lard in a pan, make it boiling hot, and fry as you do common fritters.
               
To Make a Rice Pudding.--Take a quart of milk, add a pint of the flour, boil them to a pap, beat up six eggs, to which add six spoonsful of Havana sugar, and a spoonful of butter, which, when well beaten together, add to the milk and flour, grease the pan it is to be baked in, grate nutmeg over the mixture and bake it.
               
Rice Flour Sponge Cake.--Make like sponge cake, except that you use 3/4 of a pound of rice flour, thirteen eggs, leaving out four whites and add a little salt.
               
Rice Flour Blanc Mange.--Boil one quart of milk, season it to your taste with sugar and rose water, take 4 tablespoonsful of the rice flour, mix it very smooth with cold milk, add this to the other milk while it is boiling, stirring it well.  Let all boil together about fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally, then pour it into moulds and put it by to cool.  This is a very favorite article for invalids.
               
Rice Griddle Cakes.--Boil one large cup of whole cold rice quite soft, in milk, and while hot stir in a little wheat flour or rice flour, when cold add two eggs, and a little salt, bake in small thin cakes on the griddle.
               
In every case in making rice flour bread, cake, or pudding, a well boiled pap should be first made of all the milk and water and half the flour, and allowed to get perfectly cold before the other ingredients are added.  It forms a support for them and prevents the flour from settling at the bottom, stir the whole a moment before it is set to cook. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 20, 1862, p.  1

Directions for the Use of Rice Flour

                The following recipes for making different kinds of bread, with rice flour, were published many years ago in Charleston, and are vouched for as being valuable:
               
To Make Loaf Rice Bread.--Boil a pint of rice soft, and a pint of leaven, then three quarts of rice flour, put it to raise in a tine or earthen vessel, until it has risen sufficiently; divide it into three parts, and bake it as other bread, and you will have three large loaves.  Or scald the flour, and when cold, mix half wheat flour or corn meal, raised with leaven in the usual way.
               
Another.--One quart of rice flour--make it into a stiff pap, by wetting with warm water, not so hot as to make it lumpy; when well wet add boiling water, as much as two or three quarts, stir it continually until it boils, put in 1/2 pint of yeast when it cools, and a little salt, knead as much wheat flour as will make it a proper dough for bread, put it to rise, and then add a little more wheat flour--let it stand in a warm place half an hour, and bake it.  This same mixture only made thinner and baked in rings make excellent muffins.
               
Journey or Jonny [sic] Cake.--To three spoonsful of soft boiled rice, add a small tea cup of water or milk, then add six spoonsful of rice flour, which will make a large Jonny cake, or six waffles.
               
Rice Cakes.--Take a pint of soft boiled rice, a half a pint of milk or water, to which add twelve spoonsful of the rice flour, divide it into small cakes and bake them in a brick oven.
               
Rice Cakes Like Buckwheat.--Mix one-fourth wheat flour to three-fourths superfine rice flour, and raise it as buckwheat flour, bake it like buckwheat cakes.
               
To Make Wafers.--Take a pint of warm water, a teaspoonful of salt, add a pint of the flour, and it will give you two dozen wafers.
               
To Make Rice Puffs.--To a pint of the flour, add a teaspoonful of salt, a pint of boiling water, best up four eggs, stir them well together, put from two to three spoonsful of lard in a pan, make it boiling hot, and fry as you do common fritters.
               
To Make a Rice Pudding.--Take a quart of milk, add a pint of the flour, boil them to a pap, beat up six eggs, to which add six spoonsful of Havana sugar, and a spoonful of butter, which, when well beaten together, add to the milk and flour, grease the pan it is to be baked in, grate nutmeg over the mixture and bake it.
               
Rice Flour Sponge Cake.--Make like sponge cake, except that you use 3/4 of a pound of rice flour, thirteen eggs, leaving out four whites and add a little salt.
               
Rice Flour Blanc Mange.--Boil one quart of milk, season it to your taste with sugar and rose water, take 4 tablespoonsful of the rice flour, mix it very smooth with cold milk, add this to the other milk while it is boiling, stirring it well.  Let all boil together about fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally, then pour it into moulds and put it by to cool.  This is a very favorite article for invalids.
               
Rice Griddle Cakes.--Boil one large cup of whole cold rice quite soft, in milk, and while hot stir in a little wheat flour or rice flour, when cold add two eggs, and a little salt, bake in small thin cakes on the griddle.
               
In every case in making rice flour bread, cake, or pudding, a well boiled pap should be first made of all the milk and water and half the flour, and allowed to get perfectly cold before the other ingredients are added.  It forms a support for them and prevents the flour from settling at the bottom, stir the whole a moment before it is set to cook. 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], September 24, 1862, p.  1, c. 6

A Receipt for the Times.

                Eds. Columbus Sun:--I have the opportunity of knowing that many persons are using flour who cannot procure lard; and as the times are hard, I will give a plan for making bread, which I all times regard as infinitely better than bread made of *hog grease* and *physic* (soda, salaratus, cream tartar, &c.)  Take the quantity of flour to be used with salt added to suit taste; pour upon it boiling water, stir with a spoon, and when sufficiently cool to handle place the dough upon a board covered with flour, and roll it to the thickness of half an inch, cut about the same width and roll it round with the hand as you would marbles; then bake it in a hot stove or oven (covering the vessel with flour) until brown.  This bread will be light, nice and sweet.  It rises upon the principle of expansion by heat.
    
           Persons who imagine that they cannot eat bread which does not contain *fat* and *drugs*, may use butter and syrup, and the most cultivated taste scarcely observes the difference.  This I have seen tried upon the most fastidious.                                                   VEGETARIAN. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 1, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
Water can be made almost ice cool in the hottest weather, by closely enveloping a filled canteen or other vessel with woolen cloth, kept plentifully wet and exposed. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
    
           USEFUL TO HOUSEKEEPERS.--Recent experiments in more than one family in this city have established the fact that the plant commonly known as "water pepper" or "smart weed," which may now be found in abundance along our ditches and roads, lanes and barn yards, is an effectual and certain destroyer of the bed bug.  A strong decoction is make of the herb, and the places infested with the insect washed thoroughly with it.  The plant may also with much advantage be stuffed in the cracks and corners of the room.  Elderberry leaves laid upon the shelves of a safe or cupboard will also drive away roaches and ants, while the common house fly will not venture in smelling distance of them.  These simple remedies should be extensively used.--Washington Telegraph (Ark.) 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 6
    
           PEACH LEAF YEAST.--Hops cost two dollars per pound, leaves cost nothing, and peach leaves make better yeast than hops.  Thus:  take three handfuls of peach leaves and three medium sized potatoes, and boil them in two quarts of water until the potatoes are done; take out the leaves and throw them away, peal the potatoes and rub them up with a pint of flour, adding cool water sufficient to make a paste, then pour out the hot peach leaf tea, and let it stand for about five minutes.  If you add to this a little old yeast, it will be ready for use in three hours.  If you add none, it will require a day and night before use.  Leaves dried in the shade are as good as fresh ones.  As this is stronger than hop yeast, less should be used in making up the dough.--Washington Telegraph, Ark. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 8, 1862, p. 3, c. 5
Storing Potatoes.--For several years we have found the following to be effectual in preserving potatoes from decay throughout the entire winter--
                Put them in the cellar as dry as possible, and before putting them in the bin, sprinkle the bottom well with sand and give the potatoes a slight sprinkling as they are deposited.--Field & Fireside. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, October 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
               
Useful to House Keepers.—Recent experiments in more than one family in this city, have established the fact that the plant commonly known as "water pepper" or "smart weed," which may now be found in abundance along our ditches, and roads, lanes and barn yards is an effectual and certain destroyer of the bed bug.  A strong decoction is made of the herb, and the places infested with the insects washed thoroughly with it.  The plant may also with much advantage be stuffed in the cracks and corners of the room.  Elderberry leaves laid upon the shelves of a safe or cupboard will also drive away roaches and ants, while the common house fly will not venture in smelling distance of them.  These simple remedies should be extensively used.—Exchange. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 14, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Diphtheria.

                We learn that ulcerated sore throat, (thought by some to be diphtheria,) is prevalent in portions of Banks and Franklin counties.  We find the following remedy for diphtheria in our exchanges, which is said to have been used with good result:
    
           Take a handful of alder root, the same quantity of dogwood root, and the same quantity of the bark of persimmon root.  Boil them with a pint of vinegar down to a half pint, then add a very little water, a small lump of alum and a little honey, use as a gargle. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
    
           WORTH KNOWING.--In the present scarcity of quinine, it is worth knowing that the berry of the common dogwood will break fever as successfully as quinine.  We know four plantations where they used it successfully, last summer.  One pill is a dose.  The season is now at hand to collect and dry them for use, they will prove invaluable at home and in the hospital of our soldiers.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 21, 1862, p. 2,  c. 5
               
How to Make Chimnies [sic] for Kerosene or Palmetto Oil Lamps.—Take a common sweet oil bottle, cut off the bottom, by burning a string wet with turpentine, around the bottle.  Then make a bottom of tin to fit the lamp, and fasten it to the bottle with plaster of Paris, and you have as good a chimney as you can buy.   This is something worth knowing at the present time.  When one chimney breaks, the same tin bottom will do for another.  Please let this be known for the public benefit.                             D. B. Haselton.
               
We have received from our ingenious friend, Haselton, a bottle prepared as above directed, and a mate to one he has used successfully.  It may be seen at the Courier office.—Charleston Courier, 14th.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 22, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

From the Countryman.
Salt.

                Mr. John H. Traylor, in a communication dated Whitesville, Harris County, Ga., Sept. 27, 1862, addressed 'To The Countryman," through the Columbus Daily Enquirer of 3d inst., says:--"Having noticed your communication inquiring for Mr. Stubbs, and supposing you wished to know something further about his recipe for saving pork by an economical process, I have concluded to give a safe and economical one which has been tried in my neighborhood, with very satisfactory results:
    
           To 5 gallons of water, add 7 pounds slat 1 pint syrup, and 1 teaspoonful of pounded saltpetre.  After the pork is cooled in the usual way, pack in barrels, and cover with the above mixture.  Let it remain 4 or 5 weeks, and hang and smoke in the usual manner.
    
           This plan was tried last winter by Judge Alex B. Huey, of Harris County, Ga., in saving his entire crop of pork, with perfect success he having saved 4,500 pounds of pork with only 85 pounds of salt.  I have eaten of the bacon, and have no hesitation in saying it is as well salted as any I ever saw." 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 22, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

How to Make Chimnies for Kerosene or Palmetto Oil Lamps.

                Take a common sweet oil bottle cut off the bottom, by burning a string wet with turpentine, around the bottle, then make a bottom of tin to fit the lamp, and fasten it to the bottle with plaster of paris and you have as good a chimney as you can buy.  This is something worth knowing at the present time.  When one chimney breaks the same tin bottom will do for another.  Please let this be known for the public benefit.
                                                                                                               
D. B. Haselton.
    
           We have received from our ingenious friend, Haselton, a bottle prepared as above directed, and a mate to one he has used successfully.  It may be seen at the Courier office.
                                                                                               
Charleston Courier, Oct. 14. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 22, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
               
To Keep Apples for Winter Use.--Put them in casks or bins in layers well covered with dry sand, each layer being covered.  This preserves them from the air, from moisture, and from frost; it prevents their perishing by their own perspiration, their moisture being absorbed by the sand; at the same time it preserves the flavor of the apples, and prevents their wilting.  Pippins have been kept in this manner sound and fresh til mid-summer; and how much longer they would have kept is not known.  Any kind of sand will answer, but it must be perfectly dry. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 23, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
               
Cure for Dysentery.—A friend writes us as follows:  "I have been using persimmon syrup for ten years past for dysentery and am persuaded that it has no equal as a remedy for this troublesome disease.  It is a simple, harmless and effectual astringent.  It is made of persimmons before they are quite ripe.  They should be mashed up, put into boiling water, and then strained through a coarse cloth.  This rough juice may be preserved in sugar or syrup.  If our soldiers in camp would adopt this remedy many long cases of chronic dysentery might be prevented.—[Columbus Sun. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
               
Egg Plants.—How to Cook Them.—To our friend H., who sent us those five or six model egg-plants, we tender our thanks, and also offer his good lady, and the ladies in general, the following recipe for cooking this vegetable, which we have from an experienced housekeeper, and which has been tried by our people with the most unctuous success.  One merit of it over frying is, that it avoids the use of lard, now very costly, and takes but little butter in proportion to the size and excellence of the dish:
               
Recipe.—Boil the egg-plant whole and with the peeling on in water slightly salted; when it is supposed to be cooked through and through, take it off, drain the water entirely from it, take away the black peeling; then mash it well, mixing with it a piece of butter the size of an egg, two grated biscuits, one beaten egg, salt and pepper to taste, and bake in a dish; it is ready for the table.—Edgefield Advertiser.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 5

Mode of Keeping or Preserving Sweet Potatoes.

                Raise a bed of ground about six inches above the common earth, then level it over, take a dozen corn stalks about four or five feet long, and tie them together with potatoe [sic] vines, and set them on end bound together in the centre of the bed similar to the stack pole for fodder.  Take your potatoes and pour them on the bed around the stalks until you fill the bed within eight inches of the circumference, and within four inches of the top of the corn stalks, set in the centre [sic] of the bed.  Make the hill of potatoes in shape of a cone; and let it be as round and as compact as you can well make it, then cover them with cotton seed until they hide the potatoes at least one inch thick all over, with the exception of them.--Then cover with common earth one inch and a h half thick except at the top around the corn stalks, then make a good scaffold or covering of common boards, so that it can be kept dry.  This is very important.  When the potatoes are taken out it should be done by a careful hand, and they ought to be taken from the bottom and always covered up again as good as it was at first. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, November 1, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
How to Make Vinegar.  Take one pint of molasses, put it in a jug with one gallon of warm water, not boiling, let it stand for two months, and you will have good vinegar. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 5, 1862, p.  2, c. 1
               
How to Corn Beef.—Add two pounds brown sugar to eight gallons of water, also one quart of molasses, four ounces of nitre, and fine salt till it will float an egg.  This is enough for two quarters of beef. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 5, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

A Cheap Mode of Curing Bacon.

                                                                                                Enon, Ala., Oct. 23d, 1862.
               
Editors Sun:  I saw to-day, at the house of Mr. Wm. Morton, a well known and respectable citizen of this place, good bacon, from a hog weighing 250 pounds, killed last week, made by dipping in boiling brine, hung and smoked immediately.  The plan is simple and commendable for its economy of salt.  Take a kettle or large pot nearly full of water, put in a little more salt than the water will dissolve, bring to a boil, cut up the meat, and while the animal heat is in it put in the kettle and boil from two to four minutes, according as the meat is thick or thin; rub on meal to keep off the flies, then hang and smoke it.  The brine must be kept up to its full strength by occasionally adding salt.  When the work is done, the remaining bring may be boiled down and the salt saved for other uses, or for the next killing.
               
Mr. Morton tells me he learned this plan from an old man forty years ago, who had used it for years previous.  He has frequently tried it in the month of August with invariable success.—Every one who knows him will vouch for the truth of his assertion.  He has never weighed the salt to ascertain its exact amount saved in this way, having heretofore found the chief advantage in being able to save meat at any time, but is satisfied it saves at least three fourths, one peck being equal to a bushel in the old way.  The only difference between this meat and the best winter cured bacon is that it loses slightly its flavor, and tastes a little old.  That which I saw was dry and salt enough, with no appearance of having been cooked.  He saves beef in the same manner.
               
When this plan was published last spring, I was a skeptic, believing that the meat being partially cooked, would sour and become worthless.  I knew nothing of Mr. Stubbs, and was not prepared to take for granted what he said.  I know Mr. Morton, and am satisfied.  Others may know nothing of him or I, and may still doubt.  Let every one who has tried it publish the fact and benefit the public.  Some of our blood-thirsty speculators may be hurt yet, and those planters who give the high price of salt as the reason for raising the price of their corn to unreasonable rates, may learn that honesty is the best policy.
                                                                                                                                  
N. D. Guerry. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
                A Certain Cure for Colds.--A remedy never known to fail.  Three cents worth of licorice, two cents worth of rock candy, three cents worth of gumarabic.  Put them in a quart of water, simmer them till thoroughly dissolved; then add three cents worth of paregoric and a like quantity of antimonial wine.  Let it cool, and sip whenever the cough is troublesome.  It is pleasant, infallible, cheap and good.  Its cost is only fifteen cents.
                We notice the above in our exchanges and suppose it is either a Homeopathic prescription, or that it has not been revised since the advance in the price of drugs. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Remedy in Diphtheria.

Take a handful of alder root, the same quantity of dogwood root, and the same quantity of persimmon root.  Boil them with a pint of vinegar down to a half pint, then add a very little water, a small lump of alum and a little honey, and use as a gargle.
                We find the above prescription extensively published as a remedy that is said to have done good in diphtheria.  It is a harmless gargle and a good remedy in cases of common or epidemic "sore throat," which constitute the "diphtheria" of most physicians who are famous for curing the malady, as well as of the unprofessional.
                Below we give another prescription which has long been before the people, and is entitled to confidence, and trial, in the absence of a skillful physician.
                Diphtheria and Its Cures.--The distinguishing mark of this malady from other diseases of the throat, is the formation of a membrane which increases gradually until the patient is strangled to death.  It is sometimes accompanied with ulceration and great bodily prostration.  To prevent the formation of membrane is to arrest and cure the disease.  The Cincinnati Press gives the following simple remedy:  In the early stages of the complaint, which is always accompanied by a soreness and swelling of the throat, let the patient use a simple solution of salt and water, as a gargle, every fifteen minutes.  At the same time moisten a piece of flannel with a solution of the same kind, made as warm as the patient can bear it, and bind it around his throat, renewing it as often as the gargle is administered, and in the meanwhile, sprinkle fine salt between the flannel and the neck.  Use inwardly some tonic or stimulant, either separately, or if the prostration be great, use both together.  The treatment as may be seen, is extremely simple, and if used in the earlier stages of the disease, will effect a complete cure. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Recipe for Molasses Custard.—One cup of syrup or molasses, one cup of brown sugar, four eggs, one tablespoon full of butter, beat all together.  As soon as the custard is removed from the oven, moisten a little sugar with water and spread evenly over the top of the custard.  Bake it in one crust.  Try it, and you will be very apt to try it again, whenever molasses gets down to a reasonable price.—[Columbus Sun.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Practical Hints for the Times.
"What man has done, man can do."
No. III—CLOTHING.

Besides the garment of fig leaves, extemporized by our guilty parents in the garden of Eden, the first suit of clothing worn [?] on earth was made by divine suggestion of skins, taken probably from the bodies of beasts slain in scripture [?].  From that day to the present the clothing of the race has exhibited every [illegible] variety, both as to form and material, from the most simple to the most [illegible].
                1. Robes of Skins.--  The costly robes of ermine, worn formerly by the high dignitaries of the English bench, were not more comfortable than would be a similar robe made from the skins of the American hare or of other furred animals.  Indeed, we occasionally meet even now with a person wearing a most enviable vest of otter skin with its rich coating of fur.
               
What more tasteful tippet for the shoulders of either matron or maiden can be devised than one made from the skin of the small striped squirrel, unless it may be one made from the skins of some of our wild fowl, with the glossy feathers attached, sewed firmly to a base of strengthening cloth?
               
It is within the memory of many that garments or prepared deer skin were not at all uncommon, and it is also recollected that of all suits these were the most enduring.
               
Robes of sheep skin are yet to be seen as the ordinary clothing in the East.  Why should garments of like character be disdained by our suffering poor, in these times when necessity should override fashion?
                2.  Knitted Garments.--The crochet—or hooked—needle gives such rapid results that it is surprising we do not see more of its products in common use.  For coarse work, its advantage over the common knitting needle is as ten to one.  In the articles of male attire—the ladies will pardon my non intrusion into the secret domain of the toilet and bureau—the crochet needle would be found superlatively useful in furnishing the country with gloves, socks and stockings—with the heel and toe knitted in the ordinary way, to avoid the rough knots—cravats, scarfs for the ears and neck, undershirts, drawers, and what would be as exceedingly great comfort to our soldiers on night duty a helmet of woolen yarn, made to protect the head, ears, chin and neck, and worn under the military cap.
                3.  Winter Yarns.--The scarcity of wool compels us to look around for substitutes.  The warmest pair of gloves ever worn by the writer was made of rabbit fur, carded and spun with cotton.  The negro clothes manufactured by our Yankee friends, in former years, were more or less intermixed with cow hair.  The idea may be useful.
               
If all the scraps of tattered blankets and worn out carpets that are now left to decay, on every square mile of these Confederate States—to say nothing of the wool locked up in mattresses—were picked to pieces, and carded with cotton, they would probably suffice to furnish more than half the socks now needed by our soldiers.  True, the staple will be found short and crisp, and probably the barbs of the wool would be worn smooth, but these defects will be met and remedied, in part, by mixing the wool with cotton.
                4.  Spinning Thread or Yarn.--When factories fail to supply the demand, and spinning wheels cannot be had, and even when cards are beyond reach, there is yet a resource to be had in the instrument used before either factories or spinning wheels were known, and mentioned by Solomon in his last chapter of the book of Proverbs, where in his graphic picture of the virtuous woman, he says:  "She layeth her hands to the spindle and her hands hold the distaff."  The simple process to which he alludes, and which was then the only mode of spinning, was this:  The wool, flax, or cotton was loosely distributed over a small branching rod or leafless bush from which it was fed to the spindle and the last of steel, like the spindles of our ordinary spinning wheels, or of tough hard wood, was loaded near the blunt end with a disk of metal or a ball of hardened clay, and was twirled by the fingers like a child's chincopin or button with a straw stuck through it.  The revolutions of this spindle accomplishes the twisting of the thread, as we do now by the more rapid and convenient instrumentality of the wheel or the throstle.  Slow as the process may be, it can be made to give excellent thread and yarn, which may be more economical than the now costly hanks of the factory.  Many years since there was a poor person in the neighborhood of Savannah who plied one of the instruments just described, with surprising dexterity and success.  It can be done again.
                5.  Weaving.--It has been conjectured by some of the learned that the art of weaving preceded that of spinning, "the first cloth being what we now call matting, that is, made by weaving together the shreds of bark, or fibrous parts of plants," also hair, rushes, &c.  Many a negro's bed has been made more comfortable in winter, by the addition of a coverlet of woven bark such as is seen in certain imported shoes.  No tree of India or China affords shreds better suited for such weaving than the Wahoo abounding in our swamps.  Were the idea once started among our negroes, no doubt their ready ingenuity would produce many a useful result.
                6.  Quilted Garments.--Any think stuff may be made suitable for winter use by doubling and enclosing between the two surfaces a spongy stratum of cotton batting, wool, or down.  This last may be obtained in quantity by stripping from the part of the feather next to the skin of all of our large birds, such as turkeys, geese, barn door fowls, &c.  This down should be inserted in each quilted square as soon as three sides have been produced by the needle.  The warmth of such a garment can be known only by experience.  It is exceedingly light as well as warm.  Would that each of our boys who shiver in the bleak valleys of Virginia had the trial of one.
                7.  Substitute for Socks.--In Galton's "Art of Travel" an English work containing many useful hints, it is intimated that in some respects a foot square of soft cloth is more pleasant to the foot than a sock.  To wear it, he says the foot must be placed on one of the diagonals, the corners being toward the toe, heel, and sides; the corners of the sides are to be first folded over the instep, then the cover at the toes; lastly, the foot is to be carefully inserted in the shoe, so as to leave no wrinkle, for every wrinkle will raise a blister.  "Socks similar to these," he adds, but made of blanket, and called, "blanket wrappers," are in use at Hudson's Bay, instead of shoes.  Should any one living in a city wish to wear a substitute of this sort, a pair of high gaiters, either knitted or made of cloth, will probably be necessary for appearance sake.
                8.  Bedclothes.—A bed cover so warm as to be almost uncomfortable during a bitter cold night, was one so light that it could scarcely be felt—it was a comfort of eider down.
                No family that owns a feather bed need be in want of plenty of bed cover—only let the feathers be quilted into coverlets.
                The secret of warm sleeping of a cold night consists not so much in having a soft nest in which to half bury the body, as in keeping the outer air from having access to the person, and especially to the feet.  The wagoners in Germany practice a device from which we may learn a lesson; when away from home they use what they call a sleeping bag; this is half filled with straw, into which the person inserts himself and draws the mantle close around h is neck.  The outer air is thus excluded and warmth is ensured.  Persons troubled with cold feet will luxuriate in the comfort to be afforded by a pair of drawers, or its equivalent, drawn half way up the legs and [rest illegible—out of focus]
                Cowhair Blankets.--[ all of this section illegible]
                10.  Buttons and Pins--[all of this section illegible]
                                                                                                               
Marooners, Sr. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
Cider Jelly—Too Good Not to be Known.—Boil new cider to the consistency of syrup, and let it cool, and you have a nice jelly.  No sugar or anything added to it.  We have tasted some of it, and it will be excellent for the sick.  Try it—it is most too good these times for well people.—Sumner Watchman. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
Recipe for Molasses Custard.—One cup of syrup or molasses, one cup of brown sugar, four eggs, one tablespoonful of butter; heat all together.  As soon as the custard is removed from the oven, moisten a little sugar with water, and spread evenly over the top of the custard.  Bake it in one crust.  Try it, and you will be very apt to try it again, whenever molasses gets down to a reasonable price.—[Columbus Sun. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

[For the Savannah Republican.]
Practical Hints for Hard Times.
"What man has done, man may do."
NO. IV.—FOOD.

                1.  PRESERVING MEAT WITHOUT SALT.—We need salt as a relish to our food, but it is not essential to the preservation of our meats.  The Indians used little or no salt, yet they preserved meat and even fish in abundance by drying.  This can be accomplished by fire, by smoke or by sunshine; but the most rapid and reliable mode is by all of these agents combined.  To do this select a spot having fullest command of sunshine.  Erect there a wigwam five or six feet high, with an open top, in size proportioned to the quantity of meat to be cured, and protected from the winds so that all the smoke must pass through the open top.  The meat cut into pieces suitable for drying (the thinner the better) is to be suspended on rods in the open comb, and a vigorous smoke made of half decayed wood, is to be kept up without cessation.  Exposed thus to the combined influence of sunshine, heat and smoke, meat cut into slices not over an inch thick can be thoroughly cured in twenty-four hours.  For thicker pieces there must be, of course, a longer time, and the curing of oily meat, such as pork, is more difficult than that of beef, venison or mutton.
               
To cure meat in the sun, hang it on the south side of your house, as near to the wall as possible without touching.
               
Savages cure fish by pounding it fine, and exposing it to the bright sun.
               
2.  PEMMICAN is dried meat, pounded fine and packed in its own grease.  Mr. Ballantyne, who was in the service of the Hudson Bay Company, gives the following account of the preparation of dried meat and pemmican:  "Having shot a buffalo, the hunters cut lumps of his flesh and slitting it up into flakes or layers, hang it up in the sun or before a slow fire to dry, and the fat can be dried as well as the lean.  In this state it is often made into packs and sent about the country to be consumed as dried meat.  But when pemmican is wanted it has to go through another process; the meat, when dry, is pounded until it is broken into small pieces; these are put into a bag made of the buffalo's own hide, with the hair on the outside, and well mixed with melted grease; the top of the bag is then sewed up and the pemmican allowed to cool.  In this state it may be eaten uncooked; but the men who subsist on it when travelling mix it with a little flour and water and boil it, in which state it is known by the elegant name of robbiboo.  Pemmican is good, wholesome food, and will keep fresh for a great length of time."  Galton, in his "Art of Travel," says:  "The best pemmican is made by mixing five parts of pounded dry meat with four parts of melted or boiled grease, and put into a skin bag or tin can whilst warm and soft.  The grease ought not to be very warm when poured on the dry meat."
               
4.  WHEAT FLOUR.—"The finest of the wheat" is not always the best; the whiter the flour the less the nourishment.  In pure white flour, the heart of the wheat (answering to the eye of a kernel of corn, and known as the sweetest and most nourishing part of the grain) is all sifted out.  This rejected part is all contained in the cream colored "seconds" or "shorts," which are usually sold at flour mills at half price.
               
5.  WHEAT BRAN.—It is stated by those who profess to know, as an important chemical and gastronomical fact, that there is more nourishment in one pound of wheat bran than there is in two pounds of white flour.
               
6.  GRAHAM BREAD, or bread made from unbolted wheat, is coarse and rather unpalatable, but it is far more nutritious than bread made from more costly flour, besides which, it will go nearly twice as far in housekeeping, and prove ten times more wholesome.
               
7.  MATURE BREAD.—When a wheaten loaf is allowed to stand and cool for some hours after being taken from the oven, it undergoes certain chemical changes which better prepare it for the digestive organs, and which make a less amount of the bread sufficient for the demands of the system.  The difference in economy between the hot loaf and the cold is such that, in times of scarcity in the old countries, laws are sometimes passed forbidding the use of bread under a day old.
               
8.  LEAVENED BREAD, when baked at the proper time, is more nutritious and more economical than the unleavened, because the sugary and glutinous parts are more fully developed.  There are three stages of fermentation.  Baked in the first of these, bread will be light and sweet; baked in the second, it will be light and insipid; and in the third, it will be light and sour.  It is only when baked in the first of these stages that leavened bread is either economical or wholesome.
               
9.  RICE FLOUR AND BREAD.—Rice consists almost wholly of starch.  It is this which makes the fine bolted flour of rice so clammy and adhesive when wet, that it is difficult to be converted into palatable bread.  This tendency to clamminess is best corrected by intermixing with it something which shall tend to keep the glutinous particles apart.  Equal parts of bolted rice flour, corn meal, and the pulp of the sweet potatoe [sic], with a slight admixture of wheat flour, lightened with leaven, and made into a very soft dough, gives a pan (not loaf) of delightful bread.
               
A much more manageable form of rice flour, than the bolted, can be produced by pounding in an ordinary mortar.  The rice grain must be softened by water, then partially dried, and the pulverized.  The coarseness of the flour is a partial preventive of clamminess.
               
10.  CORN MEAL AND BREAD.—Any field negro at the South can make better corn bread than can be found in Northern hotels.  The simpler the process the better the bread.  The only art practiced by the negro is in mixing well, and in allowing his dough to stand half an hour before baking; it is then in the incipient stage of the saccharine fermentation.  Corn dough, allowed to stand over night, will rise without yeast.
               
Corn, when ground into meal, is apt to become musty or acid after a few weeks.  This renders it unfit for army use, or even for storage at home.  Whoever will take the trouble to kiln dry it, will find it no more difficult to keep than the flour of any other of the cereals.
               
What a treat the kiln dried meal would be to our boys in the army!  Will not some one start a kiln for their supply?
               
11.  GRINDING.—No doubt many a poor family has been straitened for want of access to the mill.  Let such remember (if the information can reach them) that in the old Revolutionary War many a peck of wheat and other grain was ground in coffee mills and sifted in a sieve.
               
12.  INDIAN SAFKEE [?], OR BIG HOMINY.—The Indians, who had no mills, had no difficulty in preparing their corn for use.  One mode of preparing it is by means of lye.  The grain is steeped in good strong lye until the cuticle or outer skin is dissolved, when it is thoroughly cleansed from the lye and boiled until soft.  Another mode is by means of hot water and the mortar.  The corn is to be scalded just long enough to loosen the cuticle without softening the grain.  It is then to be pounded in a mortar and rubbed by hand until the husk is separated.  Another mode pursued by the Indian was by the mortar and pestle alone.  the mortar was a slightly dished block of wood, with a small cavity in the middle, about two or three inches wide, and the same deep.  The pestle was like a rail splitter's maul, and the part used for beating was the handle—the corn being put into that little cavity in the mortar and then beaten to powder.
               
13.  SUBSTITUTES FOR COFFEE.—Except in its stimulating qualities, and its peculiar and delicate aroma, coffee can be so perfectly counterfeited as to defy detection, by mixing together [illegible] the following substitutes in such [illegible] that the coffee taste of all of them shall predominate, and the peculiar flavor of no one of them shall be perceived:  viz:  Rye, wheat, barley (scalded and then parched,) okra seed, rice (parched black, but not ground,) sweet potatoes (cut into ribbons, or into dice, dried in the sun and then parched,) corn grits (parched to a dark brown,) sweet acorns, chiccory (parched brown, then broken and ground.)  These should be parched separately, and then combined in about equal proportions, or in such proportion as experiment shall decide to be necessary.  If possible, a little coffee should be combined, simply for truth's sake.  The best critic can scarcely distinguish between the spurious compound and the real coffee.
               
14.  [Illegible] THE SWEET POTATO.—All persons who have enjoyed the sugary sweetness of the sweet potato, [illegible] so as to bring out its candy.  But has any one ever tried to extract that sweetness in the form of syrup?  Who will make the experiment and let us have the result?
                                                                                                                  Marooner, Sr. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 7
               
Brandy from Persimmons.—We find in an old magazine an account of an experiment in distilling brandy from persimmons which may be interesting, since the powers that be seem determined that the people shall not get corned on corn.  The writer prepared the persimmons in the same way as peaches are usually prepared for the still, and the result of the experiment was an average of one gallon of proof spirits of an agreeable flavor for each bushel of persimmons.  Will somebody try it?—Aug. Chron.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 2, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
A Cheap Method of Curing Bacon.--At this time, when salt is selling for three hundred dollars a sack, the following simple and cheap method of curing bacon (given by a citizen of Georgia), may be worth trying:
               
I saw at the house of Mr. William Morton, a well known and respectable citizen of this place, good bacon, from a hog weighing two hundred and fifty pounds, killed last week, made by dipping it in boiling brine, hung and smoked immediately.  The plan is simple and commendable for its economy of salt.  Take a kettle or large pot nearly full of water, put it to boil, cut up the meat, and while animal heat is in it put in the kettle and boil, from two to four minutes, according as the meat is thick or thin; rub on meal to keep off the flies; then hang and smoke it.  The brine must be kept up to its full strength by occasionally adding salt.  When the work is done, the remaining brine may be boiled down and the salt saved for other uses, or for the next killing.
               
Mr. Morton tells me he learned this plan from an old man forty years ago, who had used it for years previous.  He has frequently tried it in the month of August with invariable success.  Every one who knows him will vouch for the truth of his assertion. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, December 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cheap, but Good.—A friend has suggested to us a recipe for making blacking, which he says can be recommended both for its cheapness and quality:  To a tea-cup of molasses stir in lamp-black till it is thick.  Then add the whites of two eggs, well beaten, and to this add a pint of vinegar or whiskey, (rather scarce,) and put in a bottle for use.  Shake it before using.  The experiment is at least worthy of a trial, as ordinary blacking has so rapidly advanced since the blockade.  A neatly polished boot is an ornament to the person of any man or woman, as much so, indeed as a clean shirt bosom or collar. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
We find in the Selma Reporter the following recipe, which is said to be a sure cure for small pox:
               
Take one grain each of powdered Foxglove (Digitalis) and sulphate of zinc.  Rub them together thoroughly in a mortar with 5 or 6 drops of water; this done, add 4 or 5 ounces of water, and sweeten with sugar.  Dose—a table-spoonful for an adult, and one or two teaspoonfuls for a child every two or three hours until the symptoms of the disease vanish.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, December 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                                               
Anderson, Grimes Co., Nov. 8 '62.
E. H. Cushing:--I send you the following:
               
Certain Cure for Putrid Sore Throat.—Make a strong solution of common salt and water; heat it, and apply it to the throat as hot as can be borne; for this purpose dip a flannel bandage in the solution and wrap it round the neck, sprinkling a little salt on the bandage next to the throat, and then outside of this wrap a dry towel to prevent evaporation; renew this hot application every half hour, and use a gargle of the same solution every three hours.
               
The above was recommended to me by a lady of your city, and it cured my wife after the white putrid matter or "false membrane" had formed, almost entirely filling up the throat.  It also cured another case in my family.  You need have no doubt of its efficacy.  A lady friend also informed me that our soldiers going to Virginia by the Calcasieu used it successfully.  In no case did it fail.
 
                                                                                               Yours, &c.,
                                                                                                               
J. H. W.
               
I take the following from the Louisiana Democrat:
               
To save port:--To five gallons of water add seven lbs. of salt, one pint of syrup, one teaspoonful of pulverized saltpetre.  After the pork is cut up, spread out and cooled in the usual manner, pack in good tight barrels and cover with the above liquid mixture.  Let it stand four or five weeks, well weighted down; then draw, hang and smoke in the usual way.  Thus 20 lbs of salt are made to save 1000 lbs. pork. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], December 17, 1862, p. 1, c. 3-4

Tanning.

                We are indebted to Mr. William Crutchfield, of Goochland Court House for the following details and receipt for tanning leather.  If, in any particular, not perfectly intelligible, Mr. C. will take great pleasure in affording any additional information.
    
           The true mode for farmers to adopt is for each neighborhood, consisting of from three to six, to combine, construct the vats and divide the labor among themselves.  They will make as good leather as they get, if not better, and they will get double the quantity they now receive from tanners:
    
           TANNING LEATHER.--Pure water vat six feet square, four feet deep.  Lime water vat--same.
    
           Vat for bark four feet wide, four deep, and eight long.  Soak hides till soft in pure water--from five to seven days--then flesh on beam.
    
           Beam for breaking the hides six feet long--a log, two feet in diameter, split in two--underneath hollowed out for prop, to raise or depress.  In the process of breaking, use a knife two feet long with shanks for handles--knife little rounding.  As soon as the flesh is taken off, (one hand will flesh a dozen hides a day,) the hides are put in the lime vat--weak solution--one bushel lime--first slacked.  The vat not quite full of water.  Hides to be taken out every other day to air, and replaced smooth.  Plunge or stir vat every time the hides are drawn.  An iron hook, like icehooks, to draw the hides.
    
           As soon as hair will slip, throw hides over beam, hair side up, and rub with fleshing knife.  The hair off, the hides are put back in vat of pure water, and to remain there a day or two--then throw across the beam again, and with same fleshing knife, work out all the lime and remaining flesh.  One hand will flesh 50 hides a day.
   
            The process of bating [?] may be omitted in tanning coarse leather.
    
           Take the hides as clean as possible to the bark vat.  At first one bushel of bark, pounded or ground--this weak solution to continue two days--and gradually strengthened by addition of bark, say one bushel daily.  Keep it in two weeks; handling and strengthening liquor.
    
           Then clean out vat, taking out all the bark.  Throw in pounded bark--put down one hide--cover that inch thick with bark, and so on each hide.  Let in water and let it remain a month.  Again clean out vat, reverse hides and repeat operation--and let this remain a month.  Again clean out vat and repeat operation--and remain another month.
   
             (Chestnut oak bark the best--tho' the spanish or black oak good.)
    
           After 3d month, the hide being tanned, is taken out and hung upon poles.  This is sole leather without further labor.
    
           That intended for upper leather, half day, is oiled on the grain or hair side with a mop.  Reverse side, and grease heavily on flesh side, half pound tallow and half pint train oil to a side mixed.  This mixture is prepared thus:  melt the tallow slowly and take same quantity of oil mixed and stirred in--after it becomes cool, is ready for use.  Then hang the hides in shade till dry.--Richmond Whig. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cure of Diphtheria.--The Richmond Whig says:
               
"A gentleman who tried it says that Kerosine, or coal oil, is an almost infallible remedy for the terrible and fatal disease.--Diphtheria.  The remedy is to be applied externally, by rubbing the throat with the oil freely and frequently.  It has cured numerous cases, as many probably, as fifty, in one neighborhood where our informant lives, and he knows of but one case in which it failed.  He regards it as the best remedy known for this disease.  The remedy is a simple one and easily tried." 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 17, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
Substitute for Gum Arabic.--Gum Arabic is used in some cases to increase the strength and brilliancy of starch.  For fine clothes, the gum which exudes from plum, peach or cherry trees, when transparent, answers this purpose well.  For making and sealing envelopes, the gum from the common red cherry tree is a good substitute for Gum Arabic. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 4, 1863, p. 3, c. 5
How to Destroy Garden Insects.--A decoction of the leaves of common camomile will destroy all species of insect, and nothing contributes so much to the health of a garden as a number of camomile plants dispersed through it.  No greenhouse or hothouse should ever be without it, in a green or dried state; either the stalks or the flowers will answer.  It is a singular fact that, if a plant is drooping and apparently dying, in nine cases out of ten it will recover if you plant camomile near it. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], February 26, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
                Camp Itch--A Remedy Therefor.--A gentleman who has had much experience in the treatment of that loathsome disease, the itch, furnishes the following recipe for its cure:
                For the benefit of our soldiers suffering with camp itch, if you think proper you may publish the following:  Take iodide of potassium 60 grains, lard 2 ounces, mix well, and after washing the body well with warm soap suds, rub the ointment over the person three times a week.  In seven or eight days the Acarus, or itch insect, will be destroyed.--In this recipe the horrible effects of the old sulphur ointment are obviated.
               
Cheap Blacking.--To a tea cup of molasses stir in lampblack until it is black, then add the white of two eggs, well beaten, and to this add a pint of vinegar or whiskey, and put it in a bottle for use--shake it before using.  The experiment is at least worth a trial, as the price of blacking has so rapidly advanced since the blockade. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, February 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Washing Clothes.—It is said that in washing clothes, the addition of three quarters of an ounce of borax to a pound of soap, melted in without boiling makes a saving of one half cost of soap, and three-fourths the labor of washing, besides the usual caustic effect is removed, and the hands are left with a peculiar soft and silky feeling, leaving nothing more to be desired by the ambitious washerwoman. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, March 1, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Furniture Paste.—Scrape two ounces of bees wax into a pot or basin; then add as much turpentine as will moisten it through; at the same time, powder an eighth part of an ounce of rosin, and add to it, when dissolved to a consistency of paste, as much Indian red as will bring it to deep mahogany color; stir it up, and it will be fit for use. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, March 3, 1863, p. 1, c. 6
               
Cure for Chills.—A lady subscriber to the Winchester, Tenn., Bulletin thinks it would be well for us to inform our readers and the public generally, that the marrubium vulgaris plant, commonly called hoarhound, is a certain cure.  Boil it in water and drink freely of the tea, which though very bitter is a sure remedy.  It cured her.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, March 8, 1863, p. 4, c. 1
               
To Preserve Fish.—1.  With oil:  Put the fish in jars and pour upon them salad oil until they are covered, then tie them up air tight.  This is rather an expensive method in this country, but for fish that is to be afterwards fried it is very excellent.  2.  With acid:   Dip them into or brush them over with pyroligneous acid, and then dry them by exposure to the air.  This gives a smoky flavor, but if stronger vinegar or pure acetic acid be used, no taste will be imparted.  It may be applied by means of a painter's clean brush, or even a stiff feather.  A tablespoonful is enough to brush over a large surface.  Fish and flesh so prepared will bear a voyage to the East Indies and back.  3.  With creosote:  Clean the fish and soak them for a few minutes in water containing creosote to this amount:  of two or three drops to one pint of water.  This gives the flavor of smoke to the fish.  4.  With sugar:  Fish may be preserved in a dry state, and quite fresh, by means of sugar alone; fish may be kept in that state for some days, so as to be as good when boiled as if just caught.  If dried, and kept from mouldiness, there seems no limit to their preservation, and they are much better in this way than when salted.  The sugar has no disagreeable taste.  The process is particularly valuable in making what is called kippered salmon; and the fish preserved in this manner are far superior in quality and flavor to those which are salted or smoked.  As much salt may be used as to give the taste that may be required. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
The following receipt we are assured from an entirely reliable source, makes a most useful and excellent Ointment for sores, ulcers &c.  It has been furnished by a patriotic lady of Galveston, Mrs. Arnold, who is anxious that it may be found useful to our soldiers.  We recommend its trial.  1 Ounce Venice Turpentine; 1 ounce Precipatate [sic]; 1 ounce Castor Oil; 1 ½ ounce Mutton Tallow; 1 ounce lard; 1 spoonful Spirits of Turpentine to be sell stirred in a warm earthen dish.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Typhoid Fever in the Army.—Every day we hear sad tidings of death among the gallant boys in the army from that scourge, typhoid fever.  A gentleman of the medical profession new in this city, a citizen of Texas, expresses his surprise that the potent remedy of spirits of turpentine has made so little progress in the country for the cure of this ailment.  My friend, Dr. R., a man of splendid professional ability, says that if any remedy can ever be called a specific, spirits of turpentine may be so considered in case of typhoid fever.
               
He begins with small doses of about ten drops every two hours, and continues the remedy in large doses, giving as high as a teaspoonful at a dose, till the right action is seen on the skin.
               
Spirits of nitre may be needed to relieve strangury apt to follow the administration of turpentine, but nothing further is ever needed.—Atlanta Confederacy.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, March 20, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
A Substitute for Bread.—Now that meal is hard to get about our villages and towns, we recommend lie-hominy as a good substitute, at least as a change.  The simple plan of preparing it is follows:  To a gallon of shelled corn add a half gallon of good ashes.  Boil together until the husk begins to come off the corn.  Then rub briskly to clear the grain completely of husk.  Wash the corn clear and boil it for ten or twelve hours, adding water from time to time to keep it from burning.  It is then ready, and has only to be warmed over for use as it is needed.  It is perhaps better fried.  This is said to be more wholesome than big hominy, and it is as good diet as corn bread, if not better.  It is easy to prepare, and saves the toll.  Most housekeepers know how to make it; but a few may not be informed on the important subject, and we pen this paragraph for their benefit.—Edgefield Advertiser.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
Blackberry and Wine Cordial.  We avail ourselves of the kindness of a friend to publish the following excellent receipt for making cordial.  It is recommended as a delightful beverage, and as infallible specific for diarrhoea or ordinary disease of the bowels:
                Receipt.  To half a bushel of blackberries, well mashed, add a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves; pulverize well, mix, and boil slowly until properly done; then strain or squeeze the juice through homespun or flannel, and add to each pint of the juice one pound of the loaf-sugar; boil again for some time, take it off, and while cooling, add half a gallon of best Cognac brandy.
                Blackberry Wine.--The following is said to be an excellent receipt for the manufacture of superior wine from Blackberries:
                Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for  use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence, before.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 7, 1863, p. 3, c. 7
               
An exchange gives the following recipe to make cheap blacking.
               
To a tea-cup of molasses, stir in lampblack until it is black, then add the white of two eggs, well beaten, and to this add a pint of vinegar or whiskey, and put it into a bottle for use—shake it before using.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
Blackberry Wine.—The following is said to be an excellent receipe [sic] for the manufacture of superior wine from blackberries:
               
Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand twenty four hours; stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence before.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cure for Mange.--A great desideratum for sportsmen is a certain, simple and cheap cure for mange, and one that can be easily procured in the country.  I have kept a pack of dogs for many years, and have tried, with various success, every variety of mange ointments, both of scientific and simple applications.  The most speedy, certain and simple that has yet come under my observation is the following, which I have used with entire success:
               
1 pint common soft lye soap               }
               
1/2 pint sugar,                                    }
               
1/2 pint powder of sulphur,                } well mixed together.
               
1 pint coal tar,                                   }
               
A simple application, well rubbed into the skin (not merely daubed on the hair) will in two weeks time effect the cure.  Tie the dog, after the application, in the sun for two hours, until dry, with his head well up, so as to prevent rolling, and then let him go until the gradually wears off, which will be in about two weeks.  Try it.
                                                                                                               
Hunter. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
Cheap ink.—We write this paragraph with a very black, free-flowing ink made by boiling in water the bark of the bay or dwarf magnolia, cut into small pieces.  The ink appears to us to be the equal in every respect to any other we have seen, and is easily made from a material obtainable almost anywhere in the low country.  It seems as though it would permanently retain its color, at least some writing done nearly a month ago looks blacker than it did at first.                                     [Wilmington Journal.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Blacking from China Berries.—The Columbus Sun recommends its readers to preserve the following receipt:
               
If you want good blacking, take a half bushel of China berries, and, having them well picked from the stems, put into a kettle, and add three gallons of water; boil down to one gallon, the strain the liquor, through a sieve, from the seed and skins, and add as much pine wood (the richer the better) soot as will make a good black; and it is ready for use; a pint of good or a quart of weak vinegar (or stale small beer) first mixed with the soot will make it better, and if you add the white of one egg to half a gallon of the liquor it will be best, and equal to any Yankee blacking.
               
This blacking costs little besides trouble; and we have seen boots cleaned with it inferior to none in gloss, and it will not soil a white handkerchief.
               
Let it stand several days before you bottle it off. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 30, 1863, p. 1, c. 8
Rye Straw.--A writer in the Edgefield Advertiser gives the following directions for preparing rye straw for braiding:
                The rye must be cut while in bloom.  cut as carefully as possible to prevent breaking, early in the morning, and bundle it immediately, before the sun has much power on it.  It must then be taken to a kettle of boiling water, and each bundle steeped three minutes, then open the bundles and spread out to dry and bleach, a clear sun being almost indispensable to fine color.  After it becomes properly dried, put into a bundle again to be kept in a dry place, where the dust cannot soil it.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 5, 1863, p. 3, c. 4
               
Blackberry Wine.—The following is said to be an excellent recipe for the manufacture of superior wine from blackberries:
               
Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand 24 hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for use without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence before.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, May 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
               
Strong hoarhound tea, well boiled and drunk freely, will cure the most obstinate case of chills on record.  It is easily obtained, and the remedy should be known. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, May 9, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
Blackberry wine.—The following is said to be an excellent receipt for the manufacture of superior wine from blackberries:
               
Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let it stand till the following October, and you will have wine ready for use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence before. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], May 15, 1863, p. 4, c. 1
Rye Straw for Braiding.--A writer in the Edgefield "Advertiser" gives the following directions for preparing rye straw for braiding:
               
The rye must be cut while in bloom.--Cut as carefully as possible to prevent breaking, early in the morning, and bundle immediately, before the sun has much power on it.  It must then be taken to a kettle of boiling water, and each bundle steeped three minutes, and then open the bundle and spread out to dry and bleach, a clear sun being almost indispensable to fine color.  After it becomes properly dried, put it into a bundle again to be kept in a dry place, where the dust cannot soil it. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, May 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
               
Some of our contemporaries are making inquiries as to whether hats can be made of pine straw?  We have seen several specimens of hats made of that material, and can pronounce them a very good article.  The straw should be gathered while green, boiled in water for some time, and dried in the shade, before it is fit for use.
               
It is said that bear grass makes a very durable hat.—[Claiborne Southerner. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], May 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3
Blacking from China Berries.--The Columbus Sun recommends its readers to preserve the following recipe:
               
If you want good blacking, take a half bushel of China berries, and having them well picked from the stems, put into a kettle, and add three gallons of water; boil down to one gallon, then strain the liquor, through a sieve, from the seed and skins, and add as much pine wood (the richer the better) soot as will make a good black, and it is ready for use.  A pint of good, or a quart of weak vinegar, (or stale beer,) first mixed with the soot will make it better, and if you add the whole of one egg to half a gallon of the liquor it will be best and equal to any Yankee blacking.  This blacking costs little besides trouble; and we have seen boots cleaned with it inferior to none in gloss, and it will not soil a white handkerchief.  Let is stand several days before you bottle it off.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
    
           Blacking from China Berries.--The Columbus Sun recommends its readers to preserve the following recipe.
    
           If you want good blacking, take a half bushel of China berries, having them well picked from the stems, put into a kettle, and add three gallons of water; boil down to one gallon, then strain the liquor, through a sieve, from the seed and skins, and as much pine wood (the richer the better) soot as will make a good black, and it is ready for use.  A pint of good, or a quart of weak vinegar, (or stale beer,) first mixed with the soot will make it better, and if you add the whole of one egg to half a gallon of the liquor it will be best and equal to any Yankee blacking.  This blacking costs little besides trouble and we have seen boots cleaned with it inferior to none in gloss, and it will not soil a white handkerchief.  Let it stand several days before you bottle it off. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 21, 1863, p. 1, c. 3

To Make Blackberry Wine.

An estimable citizen gives us the following recipe for making Blackberry Wine:
                "Take equal portions of Berries and Water, say to every gallon of Berries one gallon of water; put them in a clean oak barrel or keg, having a faucet inserted a few inches from the bottom.   Cover close and let it stand for 40 hours; then carefully draw off the liquid.  To every gallon of which, add 3 1/2 lbs. of good brown Sugar.  After the Sugar is well dissolved, put the liquid in another clean oak barrel or keg, until full, leaving out the bung; reserving a small quantity with which to keep the vessel full, as it ferments.  Let it stand until the process of fermentation ceases; after which, insert the bung air tight.  Place in the cellar, or some cool place, for six months; then bottle and seal up.  In two months, you will have fine Wine. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 27, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
How to Cure Chills.—Strong hoarhound tea, well boiled and drank freely, will cure the most obstinate case of chills on record.  It is easily obtained, and the remedy should be known to every poor soldier throughout the Confederacy.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 30, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Good Yeast.--A half pint corn meal, make into a batter with equal parts of sweet milk and warm water; add a large spoonful of brown sugar and a little yeast; when well risen, add corn meal sufficient to make it almost dry; then spread on a dish and put in the shade to dry.  Keep in a close bag.  One handful is the quantity to be used when you make up bread. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, June 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
An exchange gives the following receipt to make cheap blacking:
                To a tea-cup of molasses, stir n lampblack until it is black, then add the white of two eggs well beaten, and to this add a pint of vinegar or whiskey, and put in a bottle for use; shake it before using.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 9, 1863, p. 3, c. 3
               
Palmetto Hats.—A correspondent of the Mobile Gulf City Journal, gives the following mode of preparing the Palmetto Leaf for making hats:
               
"The leaf must be taken while very young and tender, (before it comes to maturity, as at that age a nice hat could not be made of it.)
               
"The proper mode of getting and preparing is thus:  When the bud is about eighteen or twenty inches high, dig below the surface of the earth and cut off the bud where it joins the root; boil in clean water four or six hours, take it out, place it in the sun for six days, when it will be bleached a beautiful white, and ready for being manufactured into hats; dampen before using.
               
"The long leave of Cabbage Palmetto is much better than the short, or swamp leaf.  Now (April or May) is the proper time to prepare it.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, June 9, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
Straw Hats and Bonnets.  The summer season is approaching when straw hats and bonnets will be in fashion.  It is important that we should look about us and see what substitute we can provide for those we have heretofore had of Northern manufacture.  A correspondent of the Edgefield Advertiser recommends selecting the finest and largest straw from the rye field for braiding straw; and gives the following directions for cutting and preparing it:  "The rye must be cut while in bloom, cut as carefully as possible to prevent breaking, cut early in the morning and bundle it immediately, before the sun has much power on it.  It must then be taken to a kettle of boiling water and each bundle steeped three minutes, then open the bundles and spread out to dry and bleach, a clear sun being almost indispensable to fine color.  After it becomes properly dried, put into a bundle again, to be kept in a dry place where the dust cannot soil it. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], June 10, 1863, p. 4, c. 1
Confederate Corks.--Rev. H. B. Pratt Chaplain of the Sixty-third North Carolina, writes to the N. C. Presbyterian:
    
           Allow me to make another suggestion.--Down in these swamp lands of Eastern North Carolina, we find an innumerable multitude of what are called "cypress knees."  They come up like little tumuli from the swampy, miry earth, and are of rather a pithy nature.  If some enterprising workman would cut these up by a circular saw, into blocks of a convenient size, and by an easily contrived knife, give them a proper shape, he could make a small fortune, as well as confer a benefit on the public, by supplying the country with "Confederate corks."  Black gum root, well dried, is better still, and both cuts and takes shape better than cork itself.  A drop of warm cement, (1 part wax or tallow and 2 of rosin,) on the top of these corks would make them equal to the best made in Sparta or Portugal, and infinitely superior to the miserable article we commonly see. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 10, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Many of our soldiers being constantly subject to change of waters and trying exposure, suffer from the flux.  An almost immediate remedy for this painful affection of the bowels is found, says an old head, in the use of sage tea, with some red pepper stirred in it.  Let it be drank at intervals, and in a short time the patient will be entirely relieved.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 6
               
Beech Tree Leaves.—The leaves of the beech tree, collected at autumn, in dry weather, form an admirable filling for beds.  The smell is grateful and wholesome, they do not harbor vermin, are very elastic, and may be replenished annually without cost. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, July 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
To Clear a Room of Mosquitoes.—Take of gum camphor a piece about one third the size of an egg and evaporate it by placing it in a tin vessel and holding it over a lamp or candle, taking care that it does not ignite.  The smoke will soon fill the room and expel the mosquitoes.  One night not long since I was terribly annoyed by them, when I thought of and tried the above, after which I neither saw nor heard them that night; the next morning there was not one to be found in the room, though the window had been left open all night. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, June 17, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
               
Hickory Rope.—We have just been shown, by an esteemed citizen of Dallas, living at Pleasant Hill, a piece of rope, made of hickory, which for strength and durability is not exceeded by that made of the Russian hemp.  The way to proceed in its manufacture is exceedingly simple.  The body of a hickory tree, about the size of a man's thigh, is to be cut six feet from its roots, and then, with a common pen knife, ribbons of the wood are peeled off successively until the grain runs straight to the roots.  These ribbons can be obtained as fast as three hands can twist them, and will do just as well for baling cotton as the best hempen rope on earth.—Selma Reporter.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 19, 1863, p. 1, c. 8
Harness Blacking.--Take of common yellow beeswax, one ounce and a half; mutton suet, four ounces and a half; turpentine, half an ounce; ivory black, three ounces.  Melt the wax in a vessel over a fire, then add the suet, and when both are melted add the turpentine.  Remove the mixture from the fire, gradually stir in the ivory black, and continue to stir and knead the mass till it is cold.  It is to be used with a brush, in the ordinary way.  This blacking is not only suitable for harness, but is said to be a most excellent water-proof blacking for boots and shoes.  It contains nothing that will injure the leather, but preserves and gives a brilliant appearance.--[Com. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, June 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
               
For Blacksmiths.—A good substitute for borax in welding, now scarce and very high, is said to be a mixture of 5 [or 8?] pounds of salt, 1 pound of copperas, and 15 pounds of sharp sand thoroughly mixed, and used in the same manner as borax. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 30, 1863, p. 3, c. 4
               
To Destroy Vermin in Houses.—As the warm season approaches, when these ephemerides swarm and multiply, the following simple remedy is suggested to prevent a late querist from being flea'd alive:  Up with your carpets, down with your curtains.  In a pailful of cold water mix well 1 lb. of chloride of lime (having first diluted it into a thin paste in a bowl of water for facility of mixture,) with a mop wet and saturate well the floor, skirtings, and any other woodwork that will not suffer injury; then shut the doors and windows close.  If there should be a suspicion of other tenants in the bedstead, take that down too.  In three or four hours all will have disappeared or perished; but to insure perfect immunity from the plague, it might be well to repeat the lustration a second time, a day or two after.  A house infested with bugs was completely expurgated on the second process as above at the cost of only 8 cents, together with the loss of a mop burnt by the fluid.—Builder.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 30, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
    
           Cut this out.--At the present season of the year, when dysentery and diarrhea are prevalent, it is well to have a preventative at hand.  Clip the one below and have it convenient.  Many years' trial has proved it a sure remedy:
    
           Take equal parts tincture of opium, cayenne pepper, rhubarb, essence of peppermint, and spirits of camphor.  Mix well in a bottle and shake before using.  Dose, from four to thirty drops, to be repeated every ten or fifteen minutes, until relief is obtained. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 30, 1863, p. 2, c. 6
Recipe for Making Worcester Sauce.  Mrs. Dr. Gage, of Union district, sent to the State Agricultural Society of South Carolina, in 1858, the following recipe for making Worcester sauce, which is said to be excellent:
     
          Take one gallon of ripe tomatoes, wash and simmer them in three quarts of water, boil it half down and strain this through a sieve.  When all is drained, add two tablespoonsful of ginger, two of mace, two of whole black pepper, two of salt, one of cloves, and one of cayenne; let them simmer in the juice until reduced to one quart, pour in half pint of best vinegar, then pour the whole through a hair sieve, bottle in half pint bottles, cork down, tightly seal, and keep in a cool place. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

Blackberry Wine.

                One of our patriotic ladies, who is engaged in making wine for the soldiers, informed us the other day of a mode adopted by her, which is a decided advantage in pressing the berries.  Instead of following the old plan of squeezing with the hand and straining through cloth, she takes a keg, sets it upon the end, puts straw in the bottom, and after pouring the berries in, pounds them with a wooden pestle, and the juice comes out of a hole in the bottom of the keg, perfectly strained and pure.
    
           We have made many inquiries as to the smallest quantity of sugar that will preserve the wine.  The lady alluded to above is of the opinion that the pure juice will keep without any sugar, and she is putting up a quantity in that way.  There should be no water used in making; the wine ferments as usual.  Others think that a pound to the gallon is necessary to preserve it.--Our readers must act upon their own judgment.  If the wine should sour, however, it will make good vinegar, which will be almost as valuable as the wine. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, July 14, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
               
Preserving Buttermilk.—Take a vessel that contains nearly twice as much as you wish to save.  While milk is plenty, fill it two-thirds full of buttermilk, and then fill up with water.  Drain off the water and refill with fresh once a week, stirring it well each time after filling, and you will have a good article always ready. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, July 14, 1863, p. 2, c. 4
               
Preserving Peaches.—Mr. Edward Bancroft, of Athens, Ga., has brought the art of preserving peaches in their own juice to a great perfection.  Having superior ripe peaches, a little hot syrup made from double refined loaf sugar and their own juice, heated with the pealed peaches, prepares them for the most perfect sealing in the cans or glass bottles.  His rule is one pound of sugar to two of fruit.  We did not know, before we drank of his make, that the juice of delicious peaches is capable of yielding a valuable wine.—Preserved without fermentation, rich peach juice may be used at the table in various ways, and give satisfaction every day in the year.  It should be bottled in the way for putting up new cider, to keep it sweet indefinitely.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Recipe for making Worcester Sauce.--Mrs. Dr. Gage, of Union District, sent to the State Agricultural Society of South Carolina, 1858, the following recipe for making Worcester Sauce, which is said to be excellent:
               
Take one gallon of ripe tomatos, wash them in three quarts of water, boil it half down and strain it through a sieve.  When all is drained, add two table-spoonsfuls of ginger, two of mace, two of whole black pepper, two of salt, one of cloves, one of cayenne; let them simmer in the juice until reduced to one quart, pour in half a pint of best vinegar, then pour the whole through a hair sieve, bottle in half pint bottles, cork down, tightly seal, and keep in a cool place. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 22, 1863, p.  4, c. 2

From advance sheets of the July and August No. of Southern Cultivator.
Drying Vegetables and Fruits.

                Editor of Southern Cultivator:  The importance of providing an abundant supply of Vegetables for the troops in the field and the hospitals is so great that the following suggestions are offered, in the hope that they may conduce to that end:
    
           The great distroyer [sic] of animal and vegetable substance is the oxygen of the air, aided by heat and moisture.--Dry oxygen will not produce decomposition.  The process of hermetically sealing consists in excluding the air.  tomatoes and all similar fruits may be preserved for any length of time by stewing them, removing the skins and introducing the pulp and juice, while boiling, into bottles or jugs of convenient size.  The vessels must be perfectly clean, heated to the boiling point before the fruit is introduced, and corked tightly, while the steam is issuing from them.  Common stone jugs or ale bottles answer perfectly well.  Glass requires care in heating, or it will crack.  The cork should be well coated with sealing wax, a mixture of five parts rosin with one of beeswax.
    
           Almost every kind of vegetables may be preserved by the simple process of drying at a low temperature.  Peas and beans require no preparation.  Okra and tomatoes should be sliced thin and dried thoroughly in the sun.  Fleshy roots such as beets, carrots, potatoes, parsnips and even cabbage, may be preserved in the following way:
    
           Wash the roots clean, and grate them on a coarse grater, such as is used for horse-radish.  Spread the pulp thinly on trays and dry in the sun, or in an oven heated to a temperature not above 125 to 130 deg. F. H. greater heat will injure the result.--When perfectly dry, the mass should be compressed into as small a space as possible, and packed in paper like smoking tobacco.  A coat of varnish would render the paper water proof.  Green corn could probably be kept in the same way, though the writer has never tried it.  Vegetables thus preserved, lose none of their nutritious properties, and make an excellent ingredient in soups.  Everything depends on the entire exclusion of moisture.  Frequent exposure to the sun is very desirable.
    
           In the preservation of all animal and vegetable substance, it is of prime importance that they be perfectly fresh.  Decay once begun can hardly bee arrested.
    
           The want of vegetable food produces a tendency to scurvy, rendering very trifling sores or wounds liable to result in dangerous ulcers.  Many valuable lives are thus lost which might otherwise be saved.
    
           These who have abundance of vegetables cannot render a better service to the country than by thus preparing them for the use of the army.
                                                                                                               
J. D. Easter, Ph.D.
    
           Rome, Ga., June 1863.
    
           The suggestions of the above article are very valuable, and we hope they will be promptly acted upon throughout the country generally.--The drying of all kinds of Fruit should, also, receive special attention; and kilns of drying-houses must be constructed without delay.  The ordinary method of drying on roofs and scaffolds in the sun, is so well understood that no description is necessary, but extensive fruit growers will find it of great advantage to have a regular Fruit Drying House, for the purpose of preparing large quantities.  An oblong room, with a brick flue, furnace or iron stove in the centre, and open slatted drawers or shelves arranged on each side, will answer; and the ingenuity of our readers will enable each to adopt such a plan as is best suited to his own requirements.--Peeled fruit always commands a higher price than unpeeled; and great care should be taken in packing and storing away after drying.
    
           The remark of Dr. Easter respecting the thorough drying and careful packing of vegetables, applies equally to fruits.  If dried in the sun, the fruits should be taken into the house at 4 or 5 o'clock P.M., to prevent the attacks of the worm producing moth, which is said to lay its eggs late in the afternoon; and, when packed away, a small quantity of China berries or leaves may be mixed with the fruit in keeping out insects.  It is, also, a great advantage to expose the bags of dried fruit occasionally in a sunny place, and to avoid placing them in any close or damp situation.  The demand for fruit is certain to be large, and the price highly remunerative; and both patriotism and interest should impel our good people--especially the ladies--to enter upon the good work earnestly and extensively.--Editor of Cultivator. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], August 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 6
    
           Dried Tomatoes.--Take ripe tomatoes and scald them in the usual way, and strip off the skins, or mash and squeeze them through a sieve, then stew the pulp slowly, so as to evaporate as much as possible, without burning, then spread it on plates, and dry it in a slow oven or in the hot sun.  When wanted to use, you have only to soak and cook a few minutes, and serve it up just as you would tomatoes stewed fresh from the garden. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], August 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
To Wounded Soldiers.--The Rockingham Register says that the pain caused by gunshot wounds, and wounds of any kind, will be relieved almost instantaneously by holding that part affected over smoking lard.  Put the lard on burning coals in a shovel or pan convenient to handle, and let the wounded part be brought as close as possible to the lard, the smoke and fumes arising from which will act like a charm upon the part affected.  The gentleman who informed the Register states that he has seen it tried repeatedly, and never know it to fail.  All who are suffering from wounds should try this simple and easily applied remedy. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 26, 1863, p. 1, c. 6
To Keep Fresh Meat in Summer.--Put the meat into a stone jar, and cover it with sour milk.  By changing the milk once or twice, it will keep a week or more.  Before cooking wash the milk from the meat, and lay it in a little soda water for a few minutes.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
Honey.—A correspondent says that the Medical Director of Ewell's corps, a successful surgeon and practitioner, has discovered by frequent trial, that honey, applied by a light brush or other convenient means of the kind, is a most effectual remedy to prevent fly blows in wounds.  It is at the same time very soothing and grateful to the wounded part; and as this question has often been discussed during the war, hospital nurses and those entrusted with the care of the wounded soldier, should preserve the recollection of this simple and convenient remedy.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], September 15, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
Sealing Wax for Fruit Cans.--Take rosin eight ounces; gum shellac, two ounces, beeswax, one half ounce; and if you desire to have it colored, English vermillion, one and a half ounces.  Melt the rosin and stir in the vermillion if used.--Then add the shellac slowly, afterward the beeswax.  This will make quite a quantity, and needs only to be melted to be ready for use at any time. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], September 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
A lady writes to the Rural New Yorker that the annoyance of musquitoes may be effectually avoided by closing one's chamber and burning some brown sugar on some live coals or shavings.  The insects become paralyzed at once.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 25, 1863, p. 2, c. 4
               
Tub Cheese.—I send you the following receipt for making what is called tub cheese.  We have made it in our family the past season—like the cheese better and it is much less labor than the usual mode:
               
Drain the curd dry, then add twice the quantity of salt you would for pressing; work it in as for butter; pack in tubs; put a cloth over to absorb the whey; change it as often as it becomes wet; put a cover fitted to the inside of the tub and a small weight over the cloth.  Keep close from flies.  May be put into the same tub at different times.
               
Waterproof Leather.—Mix together in a pipkin on the fire, two parts of tallow to one of rosin, and having warmed the boots or shoes, apply it, melted, with a painter's brush, till they will not suck in any more.  If well polished before applying the above mixture, they will polish afterwards.
               
Waterproofing cloth.—Imbue the cloth on the wrong side with a solution of isinglass, alum and soap, by means of a brush.  When dry, brush on the wrong side against the grain, and then go over with a brush dipped in water.  This makes the cloth impervious (for a long time) to water, but not to air. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], September 30, 1863, p. 3, c. 4
Useful information.--In the absence of quinine, an effective substitute may be found in red pepper tea and table salt--say a table spoonful of salt to a pint of tea--which will answer every purpose for chills.--Commence some hours before chill time, and drink copiously of the beverage.  It never fails to keep off the chill. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], October 9, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
An Effectual Cure for the Earache.  Take a small piece of cotton batting or wool, make a depression in the center with the end of the finger, and fill it with as much pulverized black pepper as will rest on a half-dime.  Gather it into a ball and tie it up; dip the ball into sweet oil, and insert it into the ear, covering the latter with cotton wool and use a bandage or cap to retain it in its place.  A most instant relief will be experienced, and the application is so gentle that an infant will not be injured by it, but experience relief as well as adults. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
Confederate Pepper.—We copy the following receipt from the Rockingham Register, for making a condiment equal to the best pepper:
               
Take eight or ten pods of red pepper, strong as you can make it; then add 1 pint of wheat and boil until it gets strong; then dry and parch it brown very slowly.  Then grind and it is fit for use.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
               
Confederate Pepper.—We copy the following receipt from the Rockingham Register, for making a condiment equal to the best black pepper:
               
Take eight or ten pods of red pepper, boil as strong as you can make it; then add one pint of wheat and boil until it gets strong; then dry and parch it brown very slowly.  Then grind and it is fit for use. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
To Make Butter in Five Minutes Without a Churn.—A correspondent highly recommends the following recipe:
               
After straining the milk, set it away for about twelve hours, for the cream to "rise."  [milk dishes ought to have strong handles to lift them by.]  After standing as above, set the milk, without disturbing it, on the stove; let it remain there until you observe the coating of cream on the surface assume a wrinkled appearance, but be careful it does not boil, as should this be the case the cream will mix with the milk and cannot be again collected.  Now set it away till quite cold, and then skim off the cream, mixed with as little milk as possible.  When sufficient cream is collected, proceed to make it into butter as follows:
               
Take a wooden bowl, or any suitable vessel, and having first scalded and then rinsed it with cold spring water, place the cream in it.  Now let the operator hold his hand in water as hot as can be borne for a few seconds, then plunge it in cold water for about a minute, and at once commence to agitate the cream by a gentle circular motion.  In five minutes, or less time, the butter will have come, when, of course, it must be washed and salted according to taste, and our correspondent guarantees that no better butter can be made by the best churn ever invented.
               
To those who keep only one cow, this method of making butter will be found really valuable; while quite as large a quantity of butter is obtained as by the common mode, the skim milk is much sweeter and more palatable.  In the summer season it will usually be found necessary to bring the cream out of the cellar (say a quarter of an hour before churning) to take the excessive chill off.  In winter place the vessel containing the cream over another containing water to warm it—then continue to agitate the cream until the chill has departed.
               
Before washing the butter, separate all the milk you possibly can, as the latter will be found excellent for tea cakes.  Butter made in this manner will be much firmer and less oily in hot weather than when made in the ordinary way.                                                                   Field and Fireside. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 21, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
An Effectual Cure for the Earache.—Take a small piece of cotton batting or wool, make a depression in the centre with the end of the finger, and fill it with as much pulverized black pepper as will rest on a half dime.  Gather it into a ball and tie it up; dip the ball into sweet oil, and insert it into the ear, covering the latter with cotton wool and use a bandage or cap to retain it in its place.  A most instant relief will be experienced, and the application is so gentle that an infant will not be injured by it.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
The Onion as a Preventive of Chills.—We publish the following communication from a gentleman who has enjoyed a long and an extensive practice of medicine.  It will be seen that he has tried the onion as a cure for ague and fever for fully fifteen years, in this State and in Eastern North Carolina, and has never known it to fail.  Quinine is worth in our drug stores from fifteen to twenty cents per grain, and it will take from five to fifteen dollars worth to cure an attack of ague.  Would it not be well, therefore, for sufferers with this disease to give the onion a fair and impartial trial, according to the directions contained below?  It is a simple remedy, and within the reach of all:
               
Mr. Editor:  In your issue of the 6th instant, I notice in your local columns, that you complain that fever and ague are prevalent in your community, while quinine is very high.  A raw onion eaten two hours before the time of the chill or ague, I found a preventative when quinine has failed.  I have used it in this State and in the eastern portions of North Carolina, in the marshes near Albemarle Sound, without failure in an instance.  When any person is taken with ague and fever, let them take an emetic, after its operation take an active mercurial, say 4 grains of calomel, 4 grains of blue mass and one grain of ipecac made into two pills, the pills to be taken at an interval of 2 hours.  Then after its action eat the raw onion with salt, pepper and vinegar to suit the taste.  I have tried it for the last 15 years.  There is also a plant n the country, known among the non-professional as "bone set," that is almost as good for chills or ague as quinine.
                                                                                                                      
Petersburg Express.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Receipt for Persimmon Brandy.

                Editors Charleston Courier:--Put the persimmons in common tubs, mash them well with your hands or small pestles, then empty into the stand till you have it half full, then add enough of warm water to fill it, then stir or churn it well.  Fermentation will begin at once in temperate weather, and they should be distilled in five or six days.  They will make about a half gallon to the bushel.  I have made three runs--distilling in seven to ten days, after putting up, and they done well.  Many others waited two or three weeks, and made nothing but sour, disagreeable water.  I am thus convinced that they should be distilled even sooner than I did.  The distillation is the same as for other brandies or whiskey.--But another important item is, to save the seeds of the persimmons after they have boiled, and you let out the slop, for they are excellent for coffee, rather stronger or rougher than the genuine Rio; hence, I mix two parts of dried sweet potatoes to one of persimmon seed.  Dr. Buck says this coffee is equal to Java coffee!  By the boiling the seeds are rid of all musilaginous substances, and just right for coffee or buttons.  If you use them for buttons, the washer woman will hardly break them with her battling stick.  For coffee they should be parched twice as long as any other substitute, so as to make them tender to the centre.
                                                                                                                               
Alabama.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

Substitute for Blue-Stone.

                Mr. E. L. Newton, of this place informs us of an experiment of Mr. Williamson, of Floyd county, last year, which will prove valuable to wheat growers, in the present scarcity of blue-stone.  Mr. Williamson took common stable manure, and dripped it just as ley is dripped.  He soaked a part of his wheat in this liquid, and a fine crop of clean wheat was the result.  Other wheat, which he did not soak, was so full of smut that he did not cut it.  Mr. Newton has some of the wheat, which can be seen at any time. 

THE DAILY INTELLIGENCER [ATLANTA, GA], November 8, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Recipe for Persimmon Brandy.

Editors Charleston Courier:
    
           Put the persimmons in common tubs, mash them well with your hands, or small pestles, then empty into the stand till you have it half full, then add enough of warm water to fill it, then stir or churn it well.--Fermentation will begin at once in temperate weather, and they should be distilled in five or six days.  They will make about half a gallon to the bushel.  I have made three runs--distilling in seven to ten days after putting up, and they did well.  Many other waited two or three weeks, and made nothing but sour, disagreeable water.  I am thus convinced that they should be distilled even sooner than I did.  The distillation is the same as for other brandies or whiskey.  But another important item is, to save the seeds of the persimmons after they have boiled, and you let out the slop, for they are excellent for coffee, rather stronger or rougher than the genuine Rio; hence I mix two parts of dried sweet potatoes to one of persimmon seed.  Dr. Buck says this coffee is equal to Java coffee.  By the boiling the seeds are rid of all mucilaginous substances, and are just right for coffee or button.  If you use them for buttons the washer woman will hardly break them with her battling stick.  For coffee they should be parched twice as long as any other substitute; so as to make them tender to the center.
                                                                                                                               
ALABAMA. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 10, 1863, p. 4, c. 4

Substitute for Blue Stone.

                Mr. E. L. Newton, of this place, informs us of an experiment of Mr. Williamson, of Floyd county, last year, which will prove valuable to wheat growers, in the present scarcity of blue stone.  Mr. Williamson took common stable manure and dripped it just as ley is dripped.  He soaked a part of his wheat in this liquid, and a fine crop of clean wheat was the result.—Other wheat, which he did not soak, was so full of smut that he did not cut it.—Mr. Newton has some of the wheat, which can be seen at any time.—Athens Banner. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, November 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
To Make Indelible Ink.—Green persimmons, say twelve of them, mash them, pour on water enough to cover them.  Boil over slow fire and not boil them too much, add in a small piece of copperas.  This ink will not change color and cannot be washed or rubbed out.  A good article of sugar it is said, can be made from persimmons. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 24, 1863, p. 4, c. 4

Substitute for Quinine.

                Eds. Chas. Courier—A paragraph with the above heading, in a late number of the Courier, suggests to me the propriety of making known the result of a late experiment of my own.  I had in my black family a case of fully developed and confirmed chills and fever of about fifteen days standing—one of those cases which in our country frequently last several weeks or months.  I cured it in three days by giving a strong decoction of the berries and root bark of the Dogwood, with one third the quantity of brandy added.—Dose:  a small wine glass full three times daily.  I have tried it since, in the incipient stages of the disease, and found it entirely effective.
               
Anson County, N. C., Nov. 7th

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 25, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
               
A Substitute for Quinine.—A New Orleans refugee, now residing in Mobile, whilst on a visit to this section some two or three weeks ago, informed us that Dr. McFarland—one of the oldest and most distinguished physicians of New Orleans, who died in that city since the commencement of the war—had discovered what he considered a most valuable substitute for quinine, and expressed a short time before his death, his deep regret that he should not live long enough to see it tested throughout the Confederacy.  The substitute is the leaves of the Balsam Apple, to be steeped for three or four days in a bottle of whiskey.  Dose—one table spoonful three times a day.—Greensboro' Beacon. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 8

Dried Pumpkins.

For the Mobile Tribune.
               
Mr. Editor:  Although it is a duty of every friend to the Confederacy to offer his mite of contribution to the army, however small, yet my modesty barely permits me to make a suggestion which my judgment tells me will be useful to the army, if adopted.  In the winter season, when vegetables are scarce, dried pumpkins would be found an excellent vegetable for the army generally, as well as the hospitals; and where dried fruit could not be obtained this article would prove "a good substitute," if planters would dry their pumpkins, an abundant supply of which could be obtained every where in the Confederacy.
               
The process of drying is as follows:  The finest pumpkins thoroughly ripe should be selected.  Lay one on its side on a table, cut off the end to the hollow, take out the seeds, and continue to cut slice after slice about an inch in width until the whole hollow of the pumpkin is cut out in rings.  Then peel the rind off each ring and hang them on sticks to dry in an airy room, passage or loft. When dried, the luscious rings are reduced to ribands.  But I think there is nothing lost but the water, which is re-supplied by cooking.  They may be packed in a small compass for transportation.  If thoroughly dried they will keep a long time.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
               
Cure for Itch.—That almost intolerable complaint, the camp itch, may be speedily and effectually relieved by the acetate of copper.  This can be prepared by placing a copper cent, or any other piece of copper, in a small quantity (say two table spoonsfuls) of strong vinegar for some twenty-four hours.  Then apply to the parts affected three or four times a day, each morning washing them with fine soap and water.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 8, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
               
English Method of Curing Beef or Pork.--For the benefit of those who are salting beef for the use of their families, we publish the following on the subject:
               
For one hundred and twelve pounds (one cwt.) of beef or pork, take ten pounds of common salt and one half pound of saltpetre.  Let the meat be well cleansed from those particles of blood which will hang about it when cut into pieces of about four or five pounds each; this is best done by washing it in salt and water, or any weak offal pickle, provided it be sweet.  Lay the meat in rows, and rub the upper side moderately with salt, then lay another layer of meat, and repeat the operation as on the first layer; in this manner continue the same proportion of salt and saltpetre, till you have the quantity you wish to cure all heaped up in a tub, or some other vessel (not of lead), in order to preserve the pickle from issuing from it.  In this state it must remain three days, then turn it into another tub, sprinkling it with salt as you turn it; when all is turned, let the pickle procured by the first rubbing be gently poured about the meat.  In this state let it remain for a week, and it will be excellent for home use.
               
Should it be wanted for exportation, pack it in this state into such casks as your order may express.  But as the greatest care for its keeping good, abroad, consists in the packing, you must put a layer of salt in the barrel, then a layer of meat, packed very close (with your hands only), and in this manner the cask must be filled up.  When headed, you must carefully filter the pickle through a coarse cloth (not boil it), and when perfectly fine, fill up the cask by the bung-hold.  In this state let it remain until the next day, in order to observe whether or n not the cask leaks, then bung it up.  By this method, I have never known an instance of its failing to cure properly.  My mother used the former part of it for family use, and it always kept any reasonable time.  The too great rubbing of meat will not keep it the better; it frequently retards the operation of salt by filling the outward pores of the meat, only to the destruction of the middle of the piece, which frequently perishes.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, January 15, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Substitute for Quinine.—An article in the Medical and Surgical Journal is devoted to "the External Application of Oil of Turpentine as a Substitute for Quinine in Intermittent Fever."  Surgeon Kennedy reports the successful trial of this application, without failure, in over thirty cases.  Of seven cases reported at the General Hospital, Guyton, Ga., the result was immediately successful in all, but in three of them the chills returned afterwards.  The mode of application recommended is:  "Half an hour before the expected paroxysm, a bandage, wet with the turpentine, is applied around the body at the lower part of the chest the linen replaced and the outside clothing buttoned.  If convenient, the patient should be placed in blankets."  When there is a probability of the return of the paroxysm on the seventh or fourteenth day, the application should be repeated. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, January 16, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
               
Recipe for Washing Clothes.—The night before washing day, put the clothes to soak in cold water, and also place on the hot stove, in a suitable vessel, two pounds of soap, cut small; one ounce borax and two quarts of water.  These may be left to simmer till the fire goes out; in the morning the mixture will be solid.  On washing day operations are commenced by setting on a stove or furnace the wash-kettle nearly filled with cold water.  Into this put one-fourth of a pound of the compound, and then wring out the clothes that have been soaking, and put them into the kettle.  By the time that the water is scalding hot, the clothes will be ready to take out.  Drain them well, and put them into clean cold water, and then thoroughly rinse them twice, and they are ready to be hung out.  When more water is added to the wash-kettle, more soap should also be added but the quantity needed will be very small.  This process has many advantages over others.  It is suitable for washing every kind of fabric; it is especially good for flannels, and seems to set colors rather than remove them from dresses or shawls, while the white clothes are rendered exceedingly white.  It costs less for soap than the common mode of washing; it is only half as laborious, the clothes are thoroughly cleansed in much less time, but not least, the soap does not act like caustic upon the hands, but after a day's washing they have a peculiarly soft, silky feeling, as far removed as is possible from the sensations produced by washing with ordinary washing compounds.—[Southern Cultivator. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 27, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
Blacking from China Berries.—The Columbus Sun recommends its readers to preserve the following receipt:
               
If you want good blacking, take a half bushel of China berries, and, having them well picked from the stems, put into a kettle, and add three gallons of water; boil down to one gallon, then strain the liquor through a sieve, from the seed and skins, and add as much pine wood (the richer the better) soot as will make a good black, and it is ready for use; a pint of good or a quart of weak vinegar, (or stale small beer) first mixed with the soot will make it better, and if you add the white of one egg to half a gallon of the liquor it will be best, and equal to any Yankee blacking.
               
This blacking costs little besides trouble; and we have seen boots cleaned with it inferior to none in gloss, and it will not soil a white handkerchief.
               
Let is stand several days before you bottle it off.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 28, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Substitute for Quinine.--An Article in the Medical and Surgical Journal is devoted to "the External Application of Oil of Turpentine as a substitute for Quinine in Intermittent Fever."  Surgeon Kennedy reports the successful trial of this application, without failure, in over thirty cases.  Of seven cases reported at the General Hospital Guyton, Ga., the result was immediately successful in all, but in three of the cases the chills returned afterwards.  The mode of application recommended is:  "Half an hour before the expected paroxysm, a bandage wet with the turpentine, is applied around the body at the lower part of the chest, the linen replaced and the outside clothing buttoned.  If convenient, the patient should be placed in blankets.   When there is a probability of the return of the paroxysm on the seventh or fourteenth day, the application should be repeated.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, February 5, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
               
To Keep Beef.--A country friend says he has been taught by necessity, since the war began, how to keep beef without salt, and desires us to tell our readers.  According to his experience and taste, beef is never fit to be eaten in steaks until a week after being killed.  He says that if it is suspended by a hook or string, in a cellar, so as not to touch the wall, it will, even in the hottest of summer, keep from one to two weeks, without a particle of salt, and in winter for a much longer time.  He has now some which he has preserved in this way ever since the 1st of December last, and thinks it greatly improved.  It is more tender, palatable and wholesome.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 17, 1864, p. 2, c. 3-4
    
           A Styptic which will stop the bleeding of the largest wound.--Scrape fine two drachms [sic?] of  Castile Soap, and dissolve in two ounces of Brandy or common spirits.  Mix well with it one drachm of Potash and keep it in a close phial.  When [tear] plied, warm it and dip in pledgets [sic?] of lint.  The blood will suddenly coagulate some distance within the vessel.  For deep wounds and amputated limbs, repeated applications may be necessary.--Rebel.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 16, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
Ed. News.—Having suffered from vaccination with the impure vaccine matter so extensively circulated over the country, and experimented until I found a successful remedy, you will please publish it for the benefit of those suffering.  Take sage leaves and vinegar, boil together, thicken with corn meal, and make poultice, apply to the wound for three days and nights, changing morning and night for fresh one, and treat constitutionally as follows:  Take 1 tablespoonful sulphur, 1 do of cream tartar, mixed with molasses, every other morning, and every other morning a dose of salts and cream tartar.  When the poultice is changed, the sore should be washed with camphor.  This course faithfully followed will cure the worst arm in the State in less than one week.
               
Yours, &c.,                                                                            O. A. McGinnis
Moscow, Texas, Feb. 27th, 1864.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 18, 1864, p. 1, c. 4
               
Confederate Sugar.--A correspondent of the Macon Telegraph gives the following process for making "Confederate sugar."  As there is likely to be a great quantity of syrup made from the Chinese sugar cane this year, the mode of converting it into sugar is worthy of being known:
               
The process is simple and easy, and plain.  In the first place, the cane must not only be ripe, but fully ripe--and the best test of its ripeness is the hardness and brittleness of its seed, never being governed by its general appearance.  It is my opinion that the prime cause of thin, dark, sour syrup, is owing to the greenness of the cane from which it is made.
               
The cane being fully ripe, it is ground and the juice boiled in the usual way.  After it is put on to boil some alkali should be added, either lye, soda or lime water, yet I know no special quantity to be added.  It makes very well to add a half pint of lime water occasionally for three or four times for a kettle sixty or eighty gallons, until the scum ceases to rise on the top, which should be removed with a strainer as fast as it rises.  All the alkali, or whatever kind, can be added at once if you choose to do so.  The fire should never be too hot for the first half hour to enable you to skim well.  After that it can be boiled rapidly if you choose until it is ready to take off, which should not be too soon, as thick syrup is much to be preferred, provided you wish to make sugar of it.  When it has reached the stage of [blot] syrup, very little more boiling will convert it into sugar, which will granulate as soon as it cools.  By boiling a little once or twice and experimenting for sugar, you will always know at what stage to remove it from the kettle better than I can tell you, though I did not make a single failure.  After removing it from the kettle, place it in some vessel a short while until some of its heat has left it, and then pour it into your barrels with the hoops a little loose in order that the molasses may drip from it, of which there will not be as much as many might suppose.  Do not stir it after removing it from the kettle as is the custom, or the grains will be small and fine. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 11, 1864, p. 1, c. 4
Good batter cakes.--Excellent batter cakes can be made without either milk or eggs.
Take equal portions of corn meal and flour, make into a better at night with warm water and a little yeast.  Bake on the griddle in the morning, as you would any other batter cake.  A little more flour than meal will be rather better than equal quantities.  If kept too warm at night, the batter may become a little sour, which every house keeper knows can be easily remedied by adding a little soda.--Lex. Gaz.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 14, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
How to Tan Squirrel Skins.--Let the hides remain in Lime--or ashes will answer--until the hair can be easily removed.  Then soak a short time in clear water, after which dry and rub them thoroughly with soft soap.  You will find, after cleansing off the soap, that your hides will be very pliant, and will be beautifully tanned.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 14, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
               
Drying Vegetables.--Nearly all our summer vegetables, as well as fruits, can be preserved by drying, or in some other way, so as to be a very palatable addition to the winter supply of our tables, and most grateful to our friends in the army.  A subscriber states that his family are using snap beans which were preserved by cutting up, taking out the strings, and thus prepared as if for the table; then scalded in salt and water, and dried on a scaffold like fruits.  Others preserve them in slat, like pickles, the bean making its own brine.  In either case the beans are soaked in water before cooking. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 25, 1864, p. 3, c. 4
A Remedy for Congestive Chills.--"The Mother of a soldier" has sent to the Petersburg Express a remedy for congestive chills, which she has never known to fail.  She has (she says) for a number of years been managing a large boarding school, and has had some experience n nursing.
    
           The remedy is spirits of turpentine, give from ten to fifteen drops, in syrup or toddy--rub the spine, chest and extremities well, adding a small quantity of oil of turpentine to prevent blistering.  The extremities should be rubbed until re-action takes place.  A cloth saturated with the mixture should be applied to the chest.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 21, 1864, p. 1, c. 4
               
Useful to Housekeepers.--The plant commonly known as "water pepper," or "smart weed," which may now be found in abundance along our ditches, roads, lanes and barnyards, is an effectual and certain destroyer of the bed bug.  A strong decoction is made of the herb, and the place infested with the insect washed thoroughly with it.  Elderberry leaves laid upon the shelf of a safe or cupboard will drive away roaches and ants, while the common house fly will not venture in smelling distance of them.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 27, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
The editor of the Houston Telegraph has been shown by Col. Sayles a pair of shoes made of the finest tanned goat skin we have ever seen made in that country.  He asked him for the method of tanning, which is as follows:  Prepare the hide in the usual way, putting it into a weak ooze at first.  The hide should be often taken out and exposed to the weather; the oftener the better.  The ooze should be kept about blood heat.  Add to the ooze a small quantity of the weed known as queens delight.  This colors the leather a handsome and permanent black.  The leather is tanned in about six days. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, July 1, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
               
Pepper Catsup.—Take green peppers, fully grown, (the bell pepper is  best), cut a small hole in one side; put them in a kettle of water, taking care that the peppers shall get filled with the water.  Let them boil until the rind assumes a whitish look.  Dip them out on a dish to cool, and drain all the water from them.  Peel the skin off; pull out the stems with the seed; work the pulp well, and return into a clean kettle, with a quart of vinegar to each pint of pulp; then put in three tablespoonsful of white mustard seed, some of black, and one spoonful of whole cloves, and salt to your taste.  Let it boil half an hour, and when cool bottle in wide-mouth bottles.  It makes bread alone palatable, and meals delightful, gives an appetite when one is wanting, and is alike good for the sick and well..—Field and Fireside. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 7, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
Peach Leaf Yeast.--Hops cost two dollars per pound, leaves cost nothing, and peach leaves make better yeast than hops.  Thus:  Take three handfulls of peach leaves and three medium-sized potatoes; boil them in two quarts of water until the potatoes are done, take out the leaves and throw them away, peel the potatoes, and rub them up with a pint of flour, adding cool water sufficient to make a paste, then pour on hot peach leaf tea, and scald for about five minutes.  If you add to this a little old yeast, it will be ready for use in three hours.  If you add none, it will require to stand a day and a night before use.  As this is stronger than hop yeast, less should be used in making up the dough.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 8, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Ruddy cheeks.--A curious work on cosmetics, recently published, strongly condemns rouge and pearl powder, but informs the ladies how they may give color to their cheeks without danger.  Thus:  Take a fragment of bright crimson silk, dip in strong spirits of wine and rub it over the cheek till a moderate tint appears.  This defies detection and is harmless.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 9, 1864, p. 4, c. 1
New Plan for Drying Fruit.--As the furze [sic?] which covers the peach is very objectionable in drying them with it on, and as peeling them for drying is a tedious process, and causes the loss of the sweetest and best parts of the fruit, a plan which will obviate both of these objections, and give us the dried fruit as good as if peeled, and in fact even better, is a desideratum the supplying of which would be very acceptable to all who are in the habit of drying this most excellent and desirable fruit for table use.  A lady friend of the writer has found it out and communicated it to him.  He will here describe it:  Make a tolerable strong lay with wood ashes by boiling them in water, letting it stand after being boiled sufficiently, until the ashes settle to the bottom when pour off the ley.  Then put the peaches to be dried in this warm but not hot enough to cook them any, and rub them in it a while.  Then take them out and wash them in clear water.  The process will take all the furze entirely off, and leave them slick and smooth as nectarines, with nothing but a skin on them.  Then cut off and dry as usual.  Peaches dried this way will be very sweet, and have all the advantages of not losing any by the usual process of peeling, as the sweetest part of the fruit is generally that next the peeling.  We have eaten pastry made with such peaches and can speak from experience--Cor. Louisville Journal.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 9, 1864, p. 2, c. 5
Vermin Riddance.--Half an ounce of soap boiled in a pint of water, and put on with a brush wile boiling hot, infallably [sic] destroys the bugs and flies are driven out of a room by hanging up a bunch of the plantain or fleawort plant, after it has been dipped in milk.  Rats and mice speedily disappear by mixing equal quantities of strong cheese and powdered squills.  They devour this mixture with greediness while it is innocent to man.  When it is remembered how many persons have lost their lives by swallowing mixtures of strychnine, etc., it becomes a matter of humanity to publish these items.--Hall's Medical Journal.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 9, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Blackberry Wine and Vinegar.

                We find in an exchange some useful hints about making blackberry wine and vinegar.  Here they are:

Blackberry  Wine.

                The blackberry contains a very large quantity of juice, but it is contained in numerous small cells, all of which must be broken in order to effect its perfect liberation.  This may be done by rubbing the berries in a tub with a wooden pestle if no better means are at hand, though a wine press might no doubt be used to great advantage.  The berries should be ripe, fresh and clean to make the nicest product.
   
            Take then as many ripe, fresh and clean blackberries as you please, and, as fast as you rub them up so as to break the cells, throw them into a vat or tub of sufficient size to hold all you propose to use at one time.  When they are thus prepared, add to the whole mass the quantity of sugar you intend to use.  Ordinary brown sugar will do very well, and the proportions may be from half a pound to two pounds for each gallon of berries.  If you desire a very light wine of the claret order, use very little sugar--if a stronger, heavier, bodied wine, use more but be careful not to use too much, or you will have a supply of cordial and not wine.  According to experience two pounds is the extreme limit.  It is very probable a good light wine may be without any sugar at all, but this we have not tried.
    
           Having mixed the sugar with the berries, then add for each gallon of berries, one quart of boiling water, and stir the whole well together.  The heat thus communicated to the mass will cause a fermentation to commence without the use of yeast or any other substance whatever.  After standing about twenty-four hours, the seeds and skins will most of them rise to the top and may be skimmed off, and the clear liquid may be drawn off into the casks or other vessels destined to receive it.
    
           The vessels containing the wine should now be removed into a cool cellar or vault, and nothing remains to be done but to allow the vinous fermentation to go through its regular course.  This it will do in the course of three or four weeks, and the vessels may then be stopped or bunged up.--We have lost two five gallon demijohns by putting in the stoppers too soon.  They exploded and went to pieces.
   
            Wine made in this way will keep well without bottling.  Any family, therefore, that can have access to berries--and almost every farmer's family can obtain them--may have a five, ten, or forty gallon cask of excellent wine--worth ten times the same quantity of cider, and a great deal better than the foreign wines which--at a very small cost of money and labor.

Blackberry Vinegar.

                Do not throw away the seeds and skins after drawing off the must.  Pour warm water over these until they are entirely covered, and let them stand in an open vessel three or four days.--Then draw off the liquid and let that stand until the acetous fermentation takes place.  A small quantity of coarse sugar or molasses will hasten the process.  In this way a most excellent article of wine vinegar may be obtained; and those who have used the delectable stuff commonly sold under the name of vinegar, will consider the quantity thus obtained from the blackberries worth more than the cost of all the materials used for making both the wine and vinegar. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 14, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
               
Pepper Catsup.--Take green peppers, fully grown (the bell pepper is best), cut a small hole in one side; put them in a kettle of water, taking care that the peppers shall get filled with the water.  Let them boil until the rind assumes a whitish look.  Dip them out on a dish to cool, and drain all the water from them.  Peel the skin off; pull out the stems with the seed; work the pulp well, and return it to a clean kettle, with a quart of vinegar to each pint of pulp; then put in three tablespoonfuls of white mustard seed, some of black, and one spoonful of whole cloves, and salt to your taste.  Let it boil half an hour, and when cool, bottle in wide mouth bottles.  It makes bread alone palatable, and meats delightful, gives an appetite when one is wanting, and is alike good for the sick and well.--Field and Fireside. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, August 17, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
Valuable Information.—For the information of our friends who have cultivated the sorghum, says the Charlotte Times, we have obtained permission to publish the annexed letter on the mode of manufacturing sugar from syrup, which has been successfully done by the author of the letter, a large and very successful planter, residing in an adjoining State:
                                                                                                                               
June 4th, 1864.
               
Dear Sir:--Yours of the 29th of May, desiring information for making sugar from the sorghum syrup is received.  In the first place, the cane must be fully ripe, so much so that the cane must look yellow, and also the juice after it is expressed.  Boil the juice down to a very thick syrup, until it bubbles like a pot of soap when it is done.  Before you commence boiling, dissolve one pint of lime into two quarts of the juice, pour it in about one hundred gallons, boil as fast as you can without running over; as for the time, you must judge by the bubbles and by holding up y our dipper, it will fall in sheets instead of drops.  Let it cool in large trays or open troughs before you pour into your barrel where you expect it to granulate.  Before pouring into the barrel, bore three holes in the bottom sufficiently large to insert three cane stalks.  The object of the cane is for the syrup to drop down through the bottom of the barrel when the cane shrinks—the cane should be moved occasionally until it commences dripping freely.  I think, if your cane is thoroughly ripe, by following the directions above you will be successful.
                                                                                                               
Respectfully Yours,                                                                                                                             _______

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 17, 1864, p. 1, c. 3

Seasonable Suggestions.

                To those who are fond of the Okra, Tomato and Lima Bean, we would commend the following directions for their preservation.  If carefully observed, these vegetable luxuries may be enjoyed in almost as much perfection at mid-winter as if they were fresh from the garden.
    
           Okra for Winter.--Take the pods when tender, cut them into slices or cross cuts half an inch thick, spread them out on a board, or string them, and hang them up in an airy place to dry; and in a few days they will be ready to put away in clean paper bags for winter use.  For soups they are as good as when fresh in summer.
    
           Tomatos [sic] for Winter.--Gather the Tomatos when they are quite ripe, least full of water, and most full of the Tomato principle, that is to say in sunny weather in July or August.  It is better that they should be small, or only of moderate size.  Scale them in boiling water.  Peel them, and squeeze them slightly.  Spread them on earthen dishes and place the dishes in a brick oven, after taking the bread out.  Let them remain there until the next morning.  Then put them in bags, and hang them in a dry place.  For soup, they may be used without preparations; for stews, soak them in warm water a few hours beforehand.
    
           Lima Beans for Winter.--Take the green beans, a little younger than they are usually pulled for boiling in summer, and spread them thinly on the floor of the garret, or any airy loft.--They will dry without further trouble than turning them over once, or twice.  When wanted for use soak them in warm water for twelve h ours before cooking.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, September 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
               
The following in the process to condense milk for the soldiers:
               
Place two quarts of new milk in a vessel over a slow fire, stir it to prevent burning, until it is about the thickness of cream, add one pound of sugar, a little at a time, stirring constantly, till it becomes thick and stiff, then spread on plates and dry in the oven or the sun, and powder it with a knife or spoon.  It can be sent in papers, and serves for both milk and sugar when dissolved in coffee or tea. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, September 20, 1864, p. 1, c. 4
               
Two parts of Epsom Salts and one of Salt, is said to be an unfailing remedy for flux—one dose frequently curing, if taken in time.
               
We find the following valuable recipe, worth more than the price of a year's subscription, in the Tyler Reporter:
               
To Make Soda.—To a gallon of strong ley add one quart of salt, and boil down.  This will make good Soda for household purposes.  It can be done directly. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 27, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
A Substitute for Preserves.--A lady writer in an exchange communicates the following bit of information obtained where she "took tea last."  A dish that I took to be preserves, was passed, which, upon tasting, I was surprised to learn contained no fruit.  The ease with which it was prepared, and the trifling cost of its materials, are not its chief recommendations, for unless my tasting apparatus deceived me, as it is n not usually wont to do, it is emphatically a tiptop substitute for apple sauce, apple butter, tomato preserves and all that sort of thing.  Its preparation is as follows:  Moderately boil a pint of molasses from five to twenty minutes, according to its consistency; then add three eggs thoroughly beaten, hastily stirring them in, and continue to boil a few minutes longer, then season with a nutmeg or lemon. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 27, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
Infallible cure for toothache.--To a tablespoonful of any kind of spirits add the same quantity of sharp vinegar and a teaspoonful of common salt; mix them well together; hold the liquid in the mouth so that it can enter the cavity or hollow of the tooth; it will give almost instantaneous relief, without any increase of pain. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 30, 1864, p. 1, c. 4
               
To take out thorns and splinters.--Make a plaster of turpentine and tallow, spread on a piece of leather, and apply it to the wound. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 13, 1865, p. 1, c. 1
               
Cure of Corns.--A correspondent of the London Lancet recommends the use of caustic in case of corns.  He says:
               
I applied it (the lunar caustic) thus:  I put my feet in warm water, and allowed them to remain till I found the outer surface of the corn was soft; I then dried the feet, and applied the caustic all over the corn--in a few minutes it was dry.  It remained so ten days, when I removed the black skin and applied the caustic again; and I continued until I had eradicated the corns completely.  I have tried the same plan with many of my patients; and those who have been sufferers for years--all have been cured.  It produces no pain, nor the least inconvenience, and does away with the necessity of cutting, which is dangerous in itself, and likely to produce extensive inflammation, with frequently the loss of life.
 

ALBANY [GA.] PATRIOT, February 16, 1865, p. 2, c. 3
               
Valuable Receipts.--A correspondent sends the Lynchburg Republican the following receipts for dying purple and for making Confederate blackings and ink.  We hope our friends in this quarter will give them a trial.  Our correspondent writes:  "I see you are publishing many valuable receipts.  We have tried your pokeberry and vinegar; it is a beautiful durable scarlet.  Let me give you one or two which I and many in this neighborhood have tried. . .  Confederate blacking and ink--(excellent).  Take elder berries and set them away in a tub of water in a cool place till they ferment, strain through a cloth or squeeze them out, and boil down to the consistency of ink, boil still more and you have a fine liquid blacking, boil still longer and you have a paste with which you may fill your old blacking boxes.  It is then put on as other blacking and does no injury to the leather.  A number of my neighbors are using it.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 22, 1865, p. 1, c. 2
How to Make Pencil Writing Indellible.--A correspondent of an agricultural paper gives the following information, which may be of service to some of our readers:
    
           "A great many valuable letters and other writings are written in pencil.--This is particularly the case with the letters our brave soldiers send home from the army.  The following simple process will make lead pencil writing or drawing as indelible as if done with ink.  Lay the writing in a shallow dish and pour skimmed milk upon it.  Any spot not wet at first may have the milk placed upon them lightly with a feather.  When the paper is wet all over with the milk take it up and let the milk drain off, and whip off with a feather the drops which collect on the lower edge.  Dry it carefully, and it will be found to be perfectly indelible.  It cannot be removed even with India rubber.  It is an old recipe, and a good one."
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, March 7, 1865, p. 1, c. 2
               
Peach Leaf Yeast.—Hops cost two dollars per pound, leaves cost nothing and peach leaves make better yeast than hops.  Thus:  take three handfuls of peach leaves and three medium sized potatoes, and boil them in two quarts of water until the potatoes are done; take out the leaves and throw them away,  peal the potatoes and rub them up with a pint of flour, adding cool water sufficient to make a paste, then pour on the hot peach leaf tea, and let it stand for about five minutes.  If you add to this a little old yeast, it will be ready for use in three hours.  If you add none, it will require a day and night before use.  Leaves dried in shade are as good as fresh ones.  As this is stronger than hop yeast, less should be used in making up the dough.—Exchange. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], March 15, 1865, p. 1, c. 2
Black Pepper and Mustard.--How to make good substitutes.--An esteemed correspondent of Gainesville, Ala., writes us:
    
           "I will give a receipt for making black pepper, and I could not tell the difference from it and the genuine.  Prepare some red pepper tea, as strong as long boiling will make it.  Soak fine wheat in it till saturated, then parch the wheat brown outside, and grind up.
   
            To take the place of mustard:  Take the inside of walnut bark, heat it up and make a plaster, and it will draw and even blister."
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, May 2, 1865, p. 3, c. 4
               
To Render Textile Fabrics Waterproof.—Take one pound of wheat bran, and one ounce of glue, and boil them in three gallons and set it aside for ten minutes; during this period the bran will fall to the bottom, leaving a clear liquor above, which is to be poured off, and the bran thrown away; one pound of bar soap cut into small pieces is now to be dissolved in it.  The liquor may be put on the fire in a tin pan, and stirred until all the soap is dissolved.  In another vessel one pound of alum is dissolved in half a gallon of water; this must be added to the soap-bran liquor while it is boiling, and all is well stirred; this forms the water-proofing liquor.  It is used while cool.  The textile fabric to be rendered water-proof is immersed in it, and pressed between the hands until it is perfectly saturated.  It is now wrung, to squeeze out as much of the free liquor as possible then shaken or stretched, and hung up to dry in a warm room, or in a dry atmosphere out doors.  When dry, the fabric or cloth so treated will repel rain and moisture, but allow the air or perspiration to pass through it.
               
The alum, gluten, gelatine, and soap unite together and form an insoluble compound which coats every fibre of the textile fabric, and when dry repel water like the natural oil in the feathers of a duck.  There are various substances which are soluble in water singly, but when combined form insoluble compounds, and vice versa.  Alum, soap, and gelatine are soluble in water singly, but form insoluble compounds when united chemically.  Oil is insoluble in water singly, but combined with caustic soda or potash it forms soluble soap.  Such are some of the usual curiosities of chemistry.