Needles, Thread, and Factory Yarns:
Articles in Civil War Newspape
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SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, May 4, 1861, p. 1, c. 7

Georgia Osnaburgs and Yarns.

25 Bales Thomaston Factory Osnaburgs, a superior article.
50 bales Thomaston Yarns, for sale by

                                                                                                               
Crane & Graybill 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, May 8, 1861, p. 2, c. 6

New Goods,
Per Ship Florida,
From Liverpool.

. . . 500 lbs Flax Thread. . .
The above goods were manufactured expressly for, and imported by

                                                                                                               
Nevitt, Lathrop & Rogers.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, Sept. 26, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
Stocking Yarn.  We learn from the Augusta Constitutionalist that the Graniteville Factory has commenced the manufacture of cotton yarn for the making of socks and stockings--the machinery for the purpose having been recently imported from England.  The yarn is said, by those who know, to be of the best quality, and it will be sold at reasonable prices. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 19, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
The editor of the Savannah News has been shown a sample ball of sewing cotton manufactured at the Sweet Water Factory, in Campbell county, Ga.  The cotton used in making the thread is of the finest kind, costing 23 cents per pound, and the thread is of a very superior quality, strong, even and free from knots, and adapted for use on sewing machines.  The ladies will undoubtedly find it preferable to the cheating Yankee spools with which they have heretofore been supplied, as a consequence of our unnecessary dependence on the North. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, November 13, 1861, p. 3, c. 3-4
. . . The above Factories, nearly all, make a surplus of cotton yarns, which are now readily sold and are being woven upon hand looms in the country, and there are several small Factories that only spin yarn in the State, not included in the above list.

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, January 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
There are thirty factories in Georgia engaged in making cotton and woolen goods, besides several smaller factories that spin yarn only.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], March 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
Sewing Machine Needles.--Dr. B. B. Alfriend, of LaGrange, Ga., has invented machinery to manufacture sewing machine needles, and is now making them.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, March 6, 1862, p. 4, c. 5
               
A blacksmith, in Wilkes county, N. C., has commenced the manufacture of ladies' sewing needles, and will soon be able to supply and required quantity. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, March 13, 1862, p. 4, c. 3
               
Dr. B. B. Alfriend, of LaGrange, Ga., has invented a machine to manufacture sewing machine needles, and is now making them.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, March 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
COTTON THREAD.--Wachovia Steam Mills, in Savannah, North Carolina, are now spinning cotton thread.  The article is scarce in the Confederacy, the North being our whole dependence heretofore. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, April 2, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
Reduction in Prices.  The Georgia factory and Athens factory have reduced the prices of yarns, osnaburgs, sheetings, etc.  They furthermore give preference to those dealers who conform to their schedule of prices, rather than the speculator.  Soldiers' families are to be supplied at wholesale prices.  This arrangement goes into effect the first of April and continues until an agreement to change shall be made.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 22, 1862, p. 3, c. 6
               
The course of the Athens, Macon and Augusta factories in fixing the price of their cotton goods at moderate rates, has met with universal commendation.  Mr. McCullough, near Gladden's Grove, Fairfield District, S. C., is manufacturing and selling cotton yarn at $1 a bunch.  This is a fair, even a liberal price, for the consumer to pay, considering the price which he has to take for his cotton.—Charleston Courier.
               
Would it not be well for the Georgia factories to imitate the patriotic course of Mr. McCullough.  Our soldiers need socks.  Our wives and daughters are willing to knit them.  The factories throughout the country should, in a corresponding spirit of liberality, aid this good work.
               
There is much deep and smothered indignation all over the land against the greedy extortioner.  Let the Courts and Grand Juries make diligent inquiry in regard to the matter, and bring guilty parties under inflections of the penal code, or the people, it is believed, will take the remedy into their own hands and commit acts of vengeance, which every good citizen should discourage and deplore.  The extortioners may be sure of one thing, that our soldiers will not be permitted to fight their battles with bare backs and empty stomachs whilst there are goods and provisions in the country.—Macon Mess. 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, May 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Augusta Auction Sale.
By W. B. Griffin.
Package Sale of
Military Goods
Direct Importation
By the Steamship Nashville.

                Tuesday, 14th of May instant, in store, commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold, a large and valuable assortment of Military Goods, direct importation, as follows: . . .
                Black and Whitney Brown Flax Thread
                White Spool Cottons and Needles 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
               
True Patriotism.—J. Starks Simms, Esq., of Grindal's Shoal, Pacolet River, S.C. has refused to allow anything made in his factory to be sold for more than it brought before the war.  While others have sold yarns at $2@2.25 per bunch, he has held it steadily at $1. 

WASHINGTON [ARK] TELEGRAPH, May 21, 1862
IMPORTANT MANUFACTORY.--The manufactory for cotton yarns in the neighboring county of Pike is of such immense importance to our people just now, that it might become an object of the enemy to destroy it....The prices charged are moderate, being considerably below those charged by similar establishments in Georgia and other parts of the South.  This is the only factory here accessible to our citizens.  People anxiously flock to purchase this necessary article from a hundred miles distant, and that in such numbers as to render it impossible to supply the demand. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Highly Important
Form Europe!
Good News for the Ladies!
Arrival of a lot of
J. & P. Coats' Best Six Cord
Spool Cotton,
Nos. 20, 30, 40, 50,

Which will be put up in packages containing one dozen spools of each of the above numbers, and sent to any part of the Confederacy to ladies making soldiers' clothing, on receipt of Five Dollars!  No one person will be allowed to purchase more than one package.
Send immediately.  First come first served.                                      H. L. Emery,
                                                                                                           
Wilmington, North Carolina. 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, June 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of
4,731 Packages
English Goods,
Direct from London, and put up expressly for this Market,
By R. A. Pringle,
Jas. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

               
On Wednesday morning, June 11, at 187 Meeting Street, commencing at 10 o'clock. . . .

2 cases Brown Glace Sewing Cotton . . .
1 case assorted Needles and Buttons . .
1 case Mixed Pins . . .
8 cases Clark's assorted Black and White Glazed Spool Cotton—2,200 dozen, 100 yards
8 cases Geo. Mosley's 3 Cord Colored, Black and White Glaced Reel—100 and 200 yards
 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, June 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Notice Extraordinary.
Good News for the Ladies.

                Arrival of 2000 dozen Coats' Spool Cotton, Nos. 20, 30, 40, 50.  This Thread will be put up in packages of six of each of the above numbers (20 spools) and sent by Express to any part of the country, on receipt of Five Dollars.  Or one dozen of each of the numbers will be sent on receipt of Ten Dollars.
               
We design that all shall have a chance to procure thread at something like a reasonable price.  No person will be allowed to purchase more than four dozen spools.
               
Also, a few thousand of Wheeler & Wilson, Singer's and Grover & Baker's Sewing Machine Needles, that will be sold by the single dozen only at $2 per dozen.
               
Address,                                                                                                G. S. Pattison,

                                                                                                                               
Atlanta, Geo.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 23, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
"Sewing Machine Needles, to be Used for the Confederate Soldiers, Sent by the Ladies of Baltimore."--The officers of the Soldiers' Relief Association return their heartfelt thanks to the noble, warm-hearted, patriotic ladies of Baltimore for their valuable and timely present.  Such Southern sisters we must ever be proud to claim.  We feel you are with us, heart and hand; and well do our noble, courageous Marylanders deserve such fair ones. 

WASHINGTON [ARK] TELEGRAPH, August 6, 1862
    
           We were pleased to observe the industry of our country ladies with their looms.  Everywhere they are in operation.  Jeans, linseys, and coarse cotton stuffs, are being turned out in an abundance, which (considering the scarcity of cards, and the inability of the Pike co. factory to supply yarns,) is truly astonishing.  The country ought to get cards for them at fair rates, and our soldiers and families would soon be independent.  As it is, we believe the women will make almost enough.  One lady has made a thousand yards already.  Others, perhaps, much more. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, August 6, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

"Pitch into 'em--Give 'em Jesse!"

                Such langage [sic] is often urged upon us in regard to extortioners, and urged, too, by men who, themselves, are generally engaged in the same business.  We beg to be excused; we are satisfied that all that has been said on the subject has had little effect upon that class and has only made the matter worse. ... Countryman comes to town with a load of watermelons and diminutive fowls, weighing perhaps a half a pound a piece.  For the first he requires fifty cents each, and for the second thirty cents.  He sells out his wagon load at thirty or forty dollars, and then, when he goes to the store and finds sugar forty cents a pound--flour fourteen dollars a hundred--molasses two dollars a gallon--thread two dollars and a half a bunch--there, you see, is "retributive injustice at once."  Like Suggs he is "kinder tuk up short," and looks both ways for Sunday.  He skins us--we skin him--it's fair all round, and when he gets home of a night he goes to bed with the consoling reflection that "he's been done as he's done to others."  As for we outsiders who are skinned by both, we pay the prices in the way of a ticket to see the show. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], August 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 7

                                                                M'Allister's Advertisements.

1.  Cotton cards, for $10 a pair, at McAllister's.
2.  Black calico, for $1 per yard, at McAllister's.
3.  French Ginghams, for $1.25 per yard, at McAllister's.
4. and 5.  J. & P. coats' Genuine 200 yds. Spool Thread, for 60c. per spool, or $7 per doz., at McAllister's.
6.  100 dozen Maddrass Handkerchiefs for $9 per dozen, at McAllister's.
7.  English shoes, for $9 and $10 per pair, at J. C. McAllister's, State Street, Jackson, Miss.
au8-1w 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], September 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 8

                                                By Br. Tardy & Co., Auc'rs, Mobile, Ala.
                                               
Cargo Sale of Foreign Importations, ...

[includes, among other things]
1000 dozen Extra Spool Cotton, in tin cans,
1800 lb pkgs. Extra Flax Thread, Nos. 30, 35, 40
75,000 Extra quality needles, assorted,
66 pkgs. English Pins.
50 6-lb pkgs Black Thread,
 

WASHINGTON [ARK.] TELEGRAPH, September 3, 1862
The cotton and wool may be had here in abundance, and willing hands to manufacture it into clothing, but the means are wanting.  The old stock of cotton cards is being worn out by use.--There are only two or three manufactories of spun thread in the whole department.  The supply from these is so inadequate as to be unworthy of consideration in estimating for a full supply for our army in this department, and the citizens at home. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, September 3, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
HIGH PRICES.--A great hue and cry has been raised against farmers because they are asking fifteen dollars per sack for flour, and one dollar per bushel for corn and barley.  We think they are doing right, and only hope the shylocks and extortioners of the town will be made to pay much higher before they get through with it.  A farmer comes to this city and sells his sack of flour for fifteen dollars in currency.  He enters a store and buys three papers of pins for three dollars; six spools of rotten thread for three dollars; two lbs of coffee for three dollars and six yards of common domestic for six dollars, making up the sum total he received for his flour.  This is not all--he cannot get his plough sharpened, his saddle mended, his wagon repaired, nor his shoe soled without paying three prices.  If these things require the strong arm of martial law to regulate them, let the remedy first be applied to the merchants and mechanics, and we vouch for it, breadstuff and forage will at once come down to their old prices.  As a class the farmers are now suffering more than any other from extortion.
 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, September 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Yarns to be Distributed to the Needy.

                                                                                              Office Roswell Manufacturing Co.,   }
                                                                                              
Roswell, Ga., Sept. 13, 1862.         }
Editors Southern Confederacy:
               
In view of the pressing want of Cotton Yarn in most sections of the country, the Roswell Manufacturing Company propose a gratuitous distribution, in October next, of one thousand bunches of Yarn to the needy poor of the counties of Cobb, Milton, Cherokee, Paulding, Pickens, Bartow, Fulton, Forsyth, DeKalb, and Floyd.  This will give to each county one hundred bunches.
               
It is desired the Judges of the Inferior Court of each county should interest themselves in the appointment of a Committee, whose pleasure, doubtless, it will be, judiciously to dispose of the Yarn, and as the amount is limited, not more than one bunch could be spared to each family.  The Yarn will be delivered to the order of the Judges of the Inferior Court, any week day during the month of October; and this early notice is given that those living remote from the court House may have an opportunity to make timely application.  If it were possible, the list of counties would be cheerfully increased, but other sections have mills near them, upon whose liberality they can doubtless depend for supply.                                                   Geo. H. Camp,
                                                                                         
Agent Roswell Manufacturing Company. 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, September 20, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
The Roswell (Cobb co.  Factory) proposes to distribute gratuitously one thousand bunches of yarn to the poor of ten of the counties adjoining, during the month of October. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 29, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Roswell Factory.

                Geo. H. Camp, Agent of the Roswell Manufacturing Company, proposes to make a donation of one thousand bunches of factory yarn to the needy families of ten counties, mentioned in his letter, which we publish to-day.  As a citizen of one of the fortunate counties, we feel thankful of course.  But this is not what we want.  Reduce your prices greatly, Mr. Camp!  otherwise it will be truly said of your donation—
                                                               
"With one hand he put
                               
A penny in the urn of poverty,
                               
And with the other took a shilling out."
                                                               
--Rome (Ga.) Southerner.
               
Yes, let prices be reduced.  When a mill uses four thousand or more pounds of cotton per day, on which a profit of eighty cents per pound is made—with yarn at one dollar per pound—and the public thus extorted upon, there is precious little merit in donating five thousand pounds to ten counties.  The cost of the yarn is not one third of one day's profit.
               
We are the friend of the manufacturing interest.  On that subject we come nearer being of one idea than in any other.  We have desired that the introduction of manufactories should be encouraged, and if they had been, the competition now would have kept prices down; but we confess to some misgivings when we see persons asking exorbitant prices for their goods because they know the people are compelled to have them, and are obliged, therefore, to give what is asked.
               
We hear of one manufacturer who is now positively refusing to sell at all, because he expects that yarn will be even higher than it is.  May the Lord have mercy on his soul.—[Atlanta Commonwealth. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, September 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
               
The Roswell (Cobb co.) Factory proposes to distribute gratuitously one thousand bunches of yarn to the poor of ten of the counties adjoining, during the month of October. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, October 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
E. Lewis advertises to-day, a supply of Sewing Needles, Chewing Tobacco, Starch and Soda, which will be in store to-morrow.  These articles are scarce, and persons wishing them should call and purchase immediately.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], October 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 8

                                                                                M'Allister's Advertisements.
                                                                                               
J. C. McAllister,
                                                                                               
Jackson, Missippi, [sic]
Has just received . . .
Also--A large lot Cotton yarns all Nos., and fifty Slaes.
Come soon as they will go off like hot Buckwheat Cakes.
 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, October 18,1862, p. 2, c.5

Just Received:

. . . 10 bales Factory Yarns
               
For sale, retail or wholesale, by
                                                                                               
DeWitt & Morgan.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, October 22, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

Athens Factory.

                The Agent of this Factory determined a week or so ago to sell thread at $3 per bunch for a given time, and adopt the miller's rule, "first come, first served."  The hour for selling was from 8 to 9 o'clock each morning.  Hundreds of people would assemble at the office each morning long before the appointed time.  So great was the pressure that many females fainted, and we are told that the scene was occasionally enlivened by rough and tumble fights.  Persons frequently put their money on the end of a pole in order to reach it to the Agent.  To some the scene was ludicrous; to others it was sad.  Saturday was the last day for selling in this manner. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
. . . Take homespun cotton, for example.  Two bunches of thread will make 32 yards--thread is selling at 4 and 5 dollars--weaving costs 10 cents a yard.  Now what is the showing.  To make 32 yards ten dollars worth of thread is required and the weaving is worth $3.20--making $13.20 as the cost of 32 yards, which from 90 cts. to a dollar a yard amounts to from $28.80 to $32!!  Talk about extortion!  What greater extortion have we than this?  We might adduce whole columns of facts showing that nearly everybody is guilty of it, and usually those who raise the most fuss about it are the very persons who are most guilty.
    
           It will be seen from the above that the much-abused factories charge only five times as much as formerly for their thread, while those who weave it and denounce them so bitterly are charging about eight times as much for cloth as formerly! 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
               
Athens Factory.—The Agent of this Factory determined a week or so ago to sell thread at $3 per bunch for a given time, and adopt the miller's rule, "first come, first served."  The hour for selling was from 8 to 9 o'clock each morning.  Hundreds of people would assemble at the office each morning long before the appointed time.  So great was the pressure that many females fainted, and we are told that the scene was occasionally enlivened by rough and tumble fights.  Persons frequently put their money on the end of a pole in order to reach it to the Agent.  To some this scene was ludicrous; to others it was sad.  Saturday was the last day for selling in this manner.—Athens Banner. 

SAVANNAH REPUBLICAN, October 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 2-3

The Factories—Gov. Brown—The Bar-
tow Petitioners—Dorcases, &c.

                Mr. Editor:  There are some facts about certain Factories which can be states, for the information of some persons in this State, who are disposed to abuse this branch of industry, because the war has given it a wonderful degree of prosperity.  Let it be remembered that most capitalists, who, in the former days of Yankee rule, ventured to invest in cotton manufacturing, lost one half or more of their investment.  Now, there is an opportunity, it would seem fair to have them double what remains, especially as the machinery is rapidly wearing out under the present impossibility of suitable repairs and the heavy pressure of work forced upon them by the demands of government and the necessities of the community. . .
               
Again, it is a fact that some of the factories of Georgia tried to keep down the price of yarns, &c.  A circular, issued about a year since, is proof before the country.  But all in vain.  Like an inflated balloon, the thing would go up, and up, notwithstanding all efforts to keep it down.  And manufacturers discovered that merchants and speculators were receiving the profits without the labor, capital or risk of their business.  It was their duty, and they took steps to take what was due.  They put their goods up at auction, and they brought them the market value, no more, no less.  If the factories continued to sell their yarn at a dollar a bunch, the state of things would have been the same, but the profit would have gone to Jew and Gentile, who had done nothing to earn it but speculate! . . .
               
During the last summer the writer was spending a short time near a large manufacturing establishment in Georgia, which, for months, had been retailing a large part of its production to families applying at the mills, for half the market [illegible] repeatedly occurred when [illegible] bunches of yarn, re-sold [illegible] full market price before they left the place!  Was that factory and its liberal managers to be blamed for this?  It is very hard that the poor women, "whose husbands and sons are in the army, and need clothes," cannot get the yarn; but the factories are not to be blamed.  It is the war and the blockade, developing the practical results of the theory of free trade.  When a country, like the South, has given no attention to manufacturing, and depended entirely upon a foreign supply of manufactured goods, and suddenly, as by this terrible war, has had all commerce cut off, it must suffer, and can never be independent and prosperous until its necessary supplies are raised and manufactured in its own territory.  Instead, therefore, of blaming the factories for what they cannot prevent, let all our capitalists build more of all kinds of manufacturing establishments, and speedily secure Southern independence of England and France, as well as the North!  It does seem as if this is the only legitimate remedy—increase the supply. . . .
               
Oh!  Gov. Brown will work the factories, increase the supply, cheapen the yarn, fill the looms of all the women in Georgia, and our brave boys will then have plenty of clothing.  Most heartily does every manufacturer wish the ladies all they desire, and our noble soldiers all they so richly merit from their fellow citizens, whose homes and property they have so courageously defended.  But the good ladies (God bless them for their good works,) are mistaken in the means for the accomplishment of the desired object.  The manufacturers, stimulated by high prices, cannot now meet their heavy contracts with the Confederate government, at low rates, and at the same time meet the popular demand for goods.  The fact that the government is now, and has been for a long time, making such heavy claims upon all cotton and woolen manufactories is one great reason for the present prices.  But even if another party could produce more than the owners and agents of Georgia manufactories, experience proves Gov. Brown is not the man "to work the machine."  Gov. Brown went into the banking business, and now we have neither gold nor silver, or even "a quarter of a cent!"  He undertook the management of military affairs, and came near involving Georgia with the Confederacy; and now, as commander-in-chief, has brought the tax payers of our commonwealth of Georgia an extra war debt of a million or more dollars!  Hurrah, for Gov. Brown!  He turned merchant and speculated in salt when it was $15 a bag, and now, behold!  it can scarcely be had for $150!  Hurrah, for Gov. Brown!
               
Should the Governor follow the advice of his feminine counsellors, and try his skill in manufacturing, reasoning from past experience and analogy, he would soon have yarn, now selling at 47, scarce at $70!  Hurrah, for Gov. Brown!
               
Ladies and gentlemen, let the Governor mind his own business, and the manufacturers theirs, for, by proof of word and deeds, they have shown themselves as patriotic as he, or any other class of Georgia's sons.                                                                                                    K. B. C. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 8

Cotton Yarns—Roswell Factory.

                We would call the attention of all such as are buying this article in Macon to ten dollars a bunch, to the following letter from Geo. H. Camp, the agent of the Roswell Factory, and then give their opinion of such Factories and dealers as have extorted these prices.—Macon Mess.
               
We are retailing yarn here in large quantities each day at $3 per bunch, when a moments reference to your Atlanta exchange, will demonstrate the fact that we supply your county not only, but residents in nearly every county in Upper Georgia, with yarn at but little over one-third the market price, which is now eight dollars.  This concession in price from the market price is the result of no pressure, aside from the wants of the country, and as our desire is solely to benefit the country no unjust comments will cause us to waver from the plan we have adopted to place yarn in the hands of the needy at a price they can afford to pay.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Cloth—Home Made.

                The Milton, N. C., Chronicle says:  "A very estimable lady—one of the smartest and prettiest in the country—wishes to know of us what she ought to charge per yard for a piece of cloth now in the loom, the cotton in which cost $4 50 per bunch, and the wool rolls $2 per pound.  To this must be added the cost of weaving, &c.—We are rather puzzled for a reply, but she ought to exact of shoemakers, tanners, flour and corn speculators about $15 a yard; and if she can possibly find a cotton factory "lord" obliged to buy it, charge the rascal $25 a yard—and then she can't "get even" with him.  To people of conscience, we do not think she could sell her cloth for less than $4 a yard, and make anything.  When we say cloth, we mean cloth; because she makes the best and prettiest article that we have ever seen manufactured in the Southern country.  This industrious lady seems desirous of selling her cloth at a price that will barely pay for the material and labor of weaving; she does not desire a big profit, for she loathes the name of an extortioner, and wishes to avoid it.  Would to heaven that all Southern ladies were like her!—There would be no laziness, no extravagance, no hifalutin tomfoolery, no Miss McFlimseys who think that God created them merely to thumb broken down pianos, screech like right owls, cut fantastic capers in fancy dances, and "show off" merchants' dry goods and prop themselves up in parlors as pretty toys for men to look at and admire.  The best music a female can make these war times is the music of the spinning wheel. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], November 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 7
The Montgomery Mail states, as an instance of female patriotism, in Butler, Alabama, that Miss A. Dunham, finding that she could not buy shoes, with her own hands tanned skins, and made shoes for her mother, three brothers, a decrepit father and herself; and Miss E. Ficklin, a girl of nine years of age, spun a most beautiful article of fine cotton sewing thread upon a common spinning wheel.  Hurrah for the Alabama ladies. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
A lady living five miles north of Ozark, Arkansas, with an axe, a saw, a chisel and an auger, made herself a loom out of oak rails, upon which she now weaves eight yards of coarse cotton cloth a day.  The thread is furnished by Major N. B. Pearce, and woven into cloth for army purposes.  Think of that, ye effeminates who loll on a sofa or carriage cushions and complain. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
               
Shoe Thread.—To make shoe thread out of cotton:  Spin the thread very fine, well twisted in spinning—put eight strands together and twist on the wheel.  Let the broach roll in starch as the thread is wound in balls.  It is best to use a needle in sewing.  The gentleman furnishing this receipt says that it will wear longer than flax shoe thread, having made and used it himself.—The thread can be colored by dyeing. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA], November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
The same journal [Pine Bluff Southron] had seen a letter from the clerk of the cotton mill at Van Buren, recently burned, which stated that their proprietors intended rebuilding it as soon as possible.  The loss by the fire was about $40,000.  He states that nearly all the wool was saved, and will be delivered to owners upon call.  The factory had just got fairly into operation, having put a double set of hands to work, which enabled them to turn out fifty pounds spun yarn per hour. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
               
A lady living five miles north of Ozark, Arkansas, with an axe, a saw, a chisel and an auger made herself a loom out of oak rails, upon which she now weaves eight yards of coarse cotton cloth a day.  The thread is furnished by Maj. N. B. Pearce, and woven into cloth for army purposes. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, November 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
The Montgomery Mail states that Miss A. Dunham, of Butler county, finding that she could not buy shoes, with her own hands tanned skins, and made shoes for her mother, three brothers, decrepit father and herself; and Miss E. Fickling, a girl of nine years of age, spun a most beautiful article of fine cotton sewing thread upon a common spinning wheel. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, December 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
How to Color Thread.—Prepare a lump of beeswax by mixing into it while in a melted state enough of soot to make it perfectly black.  When cold it is ready for use.  By drawing a white thread of cotton or silk over this twice, you will have gray thread, and by repeating it you will have it black and good enough for nearly every purpose.
               
With the above we were furnished a sample of thread colored as described, and find it all claimed for it.  The method has been tested by a well known citizen, and there is no question of its value. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 9, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
How to Color Thread.  Prepare a lump of beeswax by mixing into it while in a molten state, enough of soot to make it perfectly black.  When cold it is ready for use.  by drawing a white thread of cotton or silk over this twice, you will have grey thread, and by repeating it you will have it black, and good enough for nearly every purpose.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

No Clothing to be Sent out of the State.

                The agent of the Southern Express Company, at Macon, gives notice through the Telegraph that that Company will not receive for shipment out of the State any shoes, cloth, clothing or leather, until further notice.  It pursues this course by order of Gov. Brown.
               
This may be regarded as a measure preliminary to the seizure of the factories and tanneries by the Governor, according to authority vested in him by the Legislature.  The act of the Legislature authorizes  him to pursue this course in the event of the refusal of these establishments to furnish their fabrics for soldiers' clothing at prescribed prices, viz:  Osnaburgs and Shirtings 25 cents per yard, Woolen Jeans $2.50 per yard,  Cotton Yarns $2.50 per bunch, Leather $1 per pound, Shoes, best army pattern $8 per pair.
               
We presume that the Railroad companies have also been, or will be, forbidden by the Governor to take these articles out of the State until he effects the desired arrangement with the manufacturers. . .  

AUGUSTA [GA] CHRONICLE AND SENTINEL, December 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Special Correspondence of the Augusta Chronicle & Sentinel.
The Columbus Factories.

                                                                                                       Milledgeville, Ga., Dec. 4, 1862.
               
It is refreshing, in these days of extortion, to find individuals or corporations who are content with reasonable profits, and who refuse to lend themselves to the devices of monopoly and extortion which prevail in most of our markets.
               
The factories of Columbus—I allude especially to the Eagle and Howard mills and the Columbus Factory—afford noble examples of public spirited enterprise, which will entitle their names to grateful remembrance when those who are taking advantage of the necessities of the people are remembered, as they deserve to be, among the tories of the second revolution.
               
The Eagle and Howard mills have from the beginning of the war had heavy contracts with the Government, and all last year, with wool at 45 cents a pound, kept their woolen jeans at $1 per yard, furnishing 700 to 800 yards per week at that price.  Before the war, with wool at 25 cents, the price of their jeans was 55 cents.  Now, with wool at $2.75 per lb., they continue to furnish the Government at $2.  Thus, while wool has advanced eleven prices, or 1100 per cent., their goods have advanced only five prices, or 500 per cent.; and they have, I learn, advanced the wages of their hands from 100 to 300 per cent.  They have exchanged large quantities of goods at old prices for provisions at the same rate, which they have furnished to their operatives at cost.
               
For nearly a year they have furnished the Government with 1200 to 1300 yards of 10 oz. duck, per day, at 22 cents, while the market rate was 40 to 45 cents; and are now making the same goods at 45 cents, while the market value of even 7 oz. goods is 50 per cent. above that price.  Four fifths of their goods are under contract for the Government, the balance are retailed out among consumers in small quantities, favoring as far as possible the families of soldiers.  They sell stripes at 50 cents, for which the market price is $1.20 cents; osnaburgs and sheetings at 40 cents, for which the market rates are 65 to 75 cents.  Cotton yarns they have never sold at over $2.50 per bunch.  They have never allowed their goods to be sold at auction, or to merchants or speculators, save in exchange for wool not to be had in any other way, and they are daily refusing from all quarters offers of 65 to 100 per cent. over present rates.
               
The record of the Columbus Factory is equally clean.  They have been making tent cloths at 18 to 25 cents per yard, for over a year.  Their woolen looms made Kerseys at 75 cts, to $1.25 last year, and this year, owing to the price of wool, they have charged $1.60, until recently they have been obliged to stop for want of wool, save on work for farmers, whose wool they work up at 25 cents per yard.  At their tannery, they have furnished shoes at $3.50, as long as they had leather, and now they make them at 75 cts. to those furnishing the leather.  They have furnished soldiers' wives with thread at $2.50 per bunch.
               
I make this statement without the knowledge of the factory owners, on authority perfectly reliable, and commend their example to manufacturers throughout the Confederacy.

--------

                Our Milledgeville correspondent, a few days since, in speaking of the Eagle Mills Manufacturing Company of Columbus, Ga., stated that their mills furnished from seven to nine hundred yards of woolen jeans to the Government per week; this was an error; the mills furnish the Government with from seven to nine thousand yards per week—or at the rate of from twelve to fifteen hundred yards per day.  Quite a difference in the amount.  The proprietors of the  Eagle Mills are deserving of great praise for their patriotic liberality—Chronicle & Sentinel.
               
Dec. 13.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, December 17, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

The Cotton Factories.

                The Graniteville Factory has reduced its rates to a reasonable scale, as will be seen in their advertisement.
    
           The North Carolina Factories met in Convention on Monday, the 3d instant, in Greensboro'--eighteen establishments being represented--and adopted the following resolutions:
    
           Resolved, That we will sell all the products of our several mills at a profit not exceeding 75 per cent; and further that we give the orders of the State the preference.
    
           Resolved, That we will use our best endeavors to discourage speculation in factory fabrics, and to secure this end we will sell in quantities to such agents, as will prevent them reaching the hands of speculators.
    
           Resolved, That we believe the following prices are in conformity at present with the Exemption Act, to wit:  4-4 sheeting, 35c. per yard; cotton yarn, No. 5's to 7's, at $3 25 per bunch, of 5 pounds; No. 8's to 10's, at $3 50; No. 11's to 12's, at $3 75.
    
           Resolved, That C. W. Garrett, Assistant Quartermaster at Raleigh, be requested to publish once a month the list of prices he pays each factory for their goods. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON], December 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
How to Color Thread.--Prepare a lump of beeswax by mixing into it while in a melted state enough of soot to make it perfectly black.  When cold it is ready for use.  By drawing a white thread of cotton or silk over this twice, you will have gray thread, and by repeating it you will have black and good enough for nearly every purpose. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 20, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
Shoe thread.  40 pounds, very superior.  For sale by John Fuggo. dec20.
Goods for Christmas Holidays!  Just received a lot of groceries, dry goods, &c., such as coffee, leather, rice flour, shoe thread and pegs, starch, India rubber shoes, soap, shawls, handk'fs, smoking tobacco, dress patterns of different kinds, chewing tobacco, white goods, blacking, black velvet ribbons and others, cotton cards, homespun, needles, ladies' and misses' hose, hooks and eyes, spool cotton, and a large lot of china and glass ware, and a great many other articles too numerous to mention, for sale at the corner of Jefferson and Pine streets.  S. Schatz. dec20. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 23, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received, Cotton cards; shoe thread; needles; pins, and spool cotton at Hewit & Coulson's old stand.  dec23.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, December 24, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

Sundries Just Received.

Greer's Almanac for 1863; Needles, Pins, Fine Combs, Coarse Combs, Brace Buttons, Flax Thread.
Dec. 24, 1862.                                                                                                        L. M. Kenney.

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, January 21, 1863, p. 3, c. 7
Sundries on Hand, Just Received.
New Rice;                                              Peas;
Flour;                                                     Sugar;
Meal;                      Syrup;                    Copperas;                              Salt;
Needles;                                Pins;                       Fine Combs;
                               
Almanac for 1863.
Jan 21.                                                                                    I. M. Kenney.
 

WASHINGTON [ARK.] TELEGRAPH, February 4, 1863
One bale spun thread will be given in exchange for every ten pounds washed wool delivered to me at Washington.  The balance will be paid in cash.

                                 
                                                               Geo. Taylor. 

ATLANTA [GA] SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY, February 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 4-5
Richmond, Feb. 7-- . . .
. . . Wood is ten dollars a load--equal to from thirty to forty dollars a cord.  This is far more costly, in proportion, than sugar at 60 cents, coffee at $3 per pound, or yarns at $7 a bunch.  When warm weather comes again, wood can be had for $3 or $4 a load.  Demand and supply regulate prices. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 10, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
The Athens (Ga.) Factory, we learn, has been selling yarn at three dollars per bundle at the factory all the time, limiting the quantity to a family in such a way as not to allow one family to get more than another.  In the same way the Macon Factory has been selling its shirting, allowing one piece to a family, the head of which was to register his or her name, so that no advantage may be gained.  The cloth is furnished to one or more agents in the city who pay twenty-five cents per yard for it and sell it to the families at an advance of ten per cent.  By this generous and enlightened policy, much good has been done; by its adoption on a larger and more extended scale by all the Manufacturers in the State, a much greater amount of good may be done.—Sou. Cultivator.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 11, 1863, p. 3, c. 6
Shoe Thread--Made in the Confederacy, for sale by I. M. Kenney.  Feb. 11.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 18, 1863, p. 3, c. 6
Flax Seed.--Raise and spin your thread.  For sale at $10 per bushel, or 25 cts per lb.
Feb. 18.                                                                                  I. M. Kenney.

Pins, Needles and Fine Combs, at
Feb. 18.                                                                                  I. M. Kenney. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, February 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
To Arrive in a few Days.  75 boxes very choice Virginia chewing tobacco; 5 tierces new Carolina Rice; 25 barrels of flour; 300 pounds Killockinick smoking tobacco; 500 pounds of cotton yarn; and for sale cheap, by Jos. Nehr, Pearl Street, near Post Office, feb25. 

DALLAS HERALD, February 25, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

Spun Thread.

                The undersigned have a fine lot cotton yarn for sale at our factory near Lancaster.
                                                                                                               
Nance & Moffett.
Feb. 25, 1863—13:3t 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 3, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Here is your Chance!!!  Received and for sale--copperas; chewing and smoking tobacco; crockery and glass ware; needles; pins and silk sowing thread; ribbons and trimmings; assorted colored lining silk; black vails [sic]; very rich laces; buttons; cinnamon; spice; cloves and starch; leather; shoe pegs and shoe thread; Lowells; &c. &c., by S.  Schatz, corner of Jefferson and Pine streets, mar3. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 17, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just received, cotton cards, quinine, toilet soap, spool cotton, shoe-thread, and matches.  J. M. Benbrook, at Hewit & Coulson's old stand.  mar17 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 24, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
Just Received.  20,000 large needles; 12 doz. toilet soap; 50 pair cotton cards; 500 pounds choice smoking tobacco; 5 pounds black sewing silk.  Will be in store shortly, 80 boxes fine chewing tobacco, which will be sold for cash only, by E. Lewis, Auctioneer, Commerce Street.  mar24. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON], March 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
               
The cost of manufacturing a five pound bunch of spun cotton.--A gentleman who for many years was engaged in manufacturing cotton yarn and cloth in this State, has furnished us with the following estimate of the cost:
    
           When cotton was selling at eight cents per pound, the cost of manufacturing a five pound bunch of cotton thread, including the raw material, was about seventy cents, and including labor, wearing of machinery, etc.  Then, the usual selling price was ninety cents a bunch paying a profit of about thirty per cent. nett to the manufacturer.  Suppose the raw cotton is at this time worth sixteen cents a pound, (most of the manufacturers had already laid in more than six months supply at half that price) and the cost of manufacturing to be double former expenses, (which is not true); but at double rates for material, labor, etc. the nett cost of producing five pounds of yarn will not exceed $1.40 at the outside.  Add seventy five per cent to this which is allowed by the conscription law ($1.05, a very large profit on one bunch of yarn) and the selling price will be $2.45 per bunch.
    
           The same rule will apply to cotton cloths, and restrain the manufacturer's price to a trifle less than twenty-five cents per yard.--Iredell Express.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 31, 1863, p.  1, c. 5
Just Received.  Cotton cards; toilet soap; spool cotton; tooth brushes; pins; needles; hair pins; dressing combs; black flax; and silk thread.  J.. M. Benbrook, at Hewit & Coulson's Old Stand.  mar31.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, April 9, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Blockade Goods!!  Just Received:--20 pieces English Prints; 275 doz. Coates and Clark's Spool Thread; 30,000 Large Needles; 15 doz. Fine Tooth Brushes; 12 doz. Dressing Combs; 10 doz. Fine Teeth Combs; 5 lbs. Black Sewing Silk; 6 Extra fine French Calf skins; 5,000 Fine Segars; 500 lbs Copperas; 15 boxes I. I. Wood's Pearl Starch.  Will be in store shortly--10 tierce rice; 250 lbs. Castile soap; 40 boxes fine chewing tobacco 300 lbs. smoking tobacco; which will be sold for cash only, at the sale room of E. Lewis.  apr9.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
The Cotton Factories.—The Milton (N.C.) Chronicle says:  "We have a rod in pickle for a cotton factory in our mind's eye, the owner of which had his son detailed out of the army as an operative, and which factory evades the 75 per cent. law by bartering yarns for sugar, bacon, corn, wheat, flour, spirits of turpentine and cotton, while his 'operative' son buys yarns of his father and sells them at the tallest prices possible.  Uncle Jesse Holmes has been peeping into things over there in Alamance, and as soon as he can put his hands on a copy of the conscript oath prescribed for cotton factory 'exempts,' a small earthquake will probably jar the factory of some one in Alamance county. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 15, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Cotton Yarns
Ten Bales
Yarns,
Numbers 5 to 12,

For sale by                                                                                                     Henry Lathrop & Co. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 12, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received, on consignment, 40 pieces of English prints, 10 doz. Linen Handkerchiefs, 24 pair ladies' gaiters, 2 cases of green tea, 5 tierces rice, 20 pounds of calomel, white and colored thread, and other articles, which will be sold low for cash only, by E. Lewis.  my12.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 12, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

Cotton Yarns for Soldiers' Families.

                Mr. E. Steadman calls upon all the cotton yarn spinners of the State to meet in convention at Atlanta on the 15th inst., to arrange a united effort on the part of the factories to supply the destitute families of soldiers with yarns.
               
Col. Ira R.  Foster, Quartermaster of the State, whose duty it has been made by the Legislature to procure supplies of yarn for soldiers' families, approves this call, and urges that the work be commenced as generally and as soon as possible. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received, English berage; black alpacca; cottonade; L. C. handkerchiefs; silk handkerchiefs; head handkerchiefs; white cotton hose; pins; grey and black flax thread; English tooth brushes; shirt bosoms; dressing combs; bund [?] combs; fine tooth combs; puff combs; bonnet and tuck combs; pocket combs; 12 doz. lead pencils; 150 gross assorted buttons; 2000 harness needles; coat binding; hooks and eyes; envolops [sic]; letter paper; spool cotton; gents cravats; &c.  for sale cash at Hewit & Coulson's old Stand.  J. M. Benbrook.  my20.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, May 20, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

                                                                Cotton Spinner's Convention.

                In conformity with a request published some time since, a meeting of the cotton spinners of the State was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on the 15th of May.
    
           There were present:  John White, Georgia Factory; Hugh McLean, Alguadon Factory; Thomas Leslie, Troup Factory; and E. Steadman, Gwinnett Manufacturing company. ... for the purpose of taking into consideration the best means of supplying the great destitution in cotton Yarns, now being felt, all over our State ...  The great scarcity of Cotton Yarns--the limited means of soldiers wives and families--the probably continuance of this unholy war, and the apparent suffering that must continue to accrue to the families of our noble defenders on account of the scarcity of y yarns, and the almost impossibility of procuring Cotton Cards ... Let it be remembered, that without the aid of Factories, thread cannot be obtained, and the destitute poor cannot be clad.  Let the families of our soldiers be fed and clothed, and they will more cheerfully and patiently bear the toil and suffering of camp, and more gallantly meet the assaults of the enemy.  Let them be neglected, and dissatisfaction and desertion will inevitably follow. ... 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 23, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Something new at Nash's Music Store.  Linen lawn and muslin dresses; calicoes; ladies black and white hose; socks; Coates spool cotton; Hemming & Son's needles; solid headed pins; pens; ink and paper; black sewing silk; flax thread; pearl and agate shirt buttons; Woostenheim pen knives; army knives; guttapercha hair pins; tooth brushes; fine union drill for pants; lawn and cambric handkerchiefs; also violin strings, again.  my23. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 26, 1863, p. 1, c. 4

Cotton Spinners' Convention.

                In conformity with a request published some time since, a meeting of the Cotton Spinners of the State was held at Atlanta, Ga., on the 15th of May.
               
There were present, John White, of Georgia Factory; Isaac Powell, High Shoals Factory; Hugh McLean, Agaudon Mill; Thomas Leslie, Troup Factory, and E. Steadman, Gwinnett Manufacturing Company.  On motion, John White was elected Chairman, and E. Steadman, Secretary.  After consultation the meeting agreed upon the following:

(Circular.)
To the Cotton Spinners of Georgia.

                In pursuance of a call made upon the Cotton Spinners of Georgia to assemble in Convention in the city of Atlanta, for the purpose of taking into consideration the best means of supplying the great destitution in Cotton Yarns, now being felt all over our State, the undersigned duly assembled.  After a deliberate examination of all the facts laid before us, to wit:  the great scarcity of Cotton Yarns; the limited means of soldiers' wives and families; the probable continuance of this unholy war; and the apparent suffering that must continue to accrue to the families of our noble defenders on account of the scarcity of Yarns; and the almost impossibility of procuring Cotton Cards, we have determined to act upon the following plan, and earnestly request Cotton Spinners all over the State heartily to co-operate with us.
               
We hereby pledge ourselves to furnish to General Ira R. Foster, Quartermaster General of the State, one-eight of our production of Cotton Yarns weekly, at one-half the current prices at the time they are furnished.  These Yarns to be issued to the Inferior Courts of each county, and by them to be distributed to the destitute of their counties, as provided for by a resolution of the late Legislature.  These Yarns to be delivered by us at the nearest depot of transportation.
               
This plan cannot fail to commend itself to every patriot of the Empire State.—Thousands of our fellow citizens, clad in the armor of war, are on distant fields battling for our rights and cheerfully risking their lives in  defence of us, our homes and altars.  Their families are consigned to our care.  They are in great need of Yarns with which to weave them necessary clothing.  Cotton Cards cannot be procured.  Their only hope is in the factories of their State.  To them they appeal, and to them they surely will not appeal in vain.
                                                                                                             
John White,
                                                                                                                       
Georgia Factory.
                                                                                                             
Isaac Powell,
                                                                                                                       
High Shoals Factory.
                                                                                                             
Hugh MacLean,
                       
                                                                                                Aguadon Mill.
                                                                                                             
Thos. Leslie,
                                                                                                                       
Troup Factory.
                                                                                                              E. Steadman,
                                                                                                 
Gwinnett Manufacturing Company.

____

                                                                                             Quartermaster  General's Office,        }
                                                                                                         
Atlanta, May 15, 1863.        }
               
The above circular is sent forth with the earnest hope, that every cotton spinner in Georgia will cheerfully and promptly respond to its appeal and act upon its plan.
               
I know of no act by which proprietors of factories can more surely nerve the arms of our brave soldiers, than by furnishing thread, by which the loved ones at home can be comfortably clad and protected from the rigors of a coming winter.  A failure to respond will result in much suffering among the families of those who have sacrificed their all for our defense and our comfort.  Let it be remembered that without the aid of factories, thread cannot be obtained, and the destitute poor cannot be clad.  Let the families of our soldiers be fed and clothed, and they will more cheerfully and patiently bear the toils and suffering of the camp, and more gallantly meet the assault of the enemy.  Let them be neglected, and dissatisfaction on the part of many, and desertion in some, will inevitably follow.  How much then depends upon the action of our cotton spinners in this matter.
               
In behalf of the destitute families of our gallant soldiers who appeal to the cotton spinners of Georgia, we appeal with confidence that they will not disappoint us, but will nobly and patriotically come to our aid in this our time of need.
               
The yarns so obtained will be furnished gratuitously to the destitute of our State.
                                                                                                                               
Ira R. Foster,
                                                                                          
Quartermaster General State of Georgia.
               
P.S.—Each daily of the State will copy the above three times—each weekly twice.  As the matter is one of charity, it is hoped that the charges for insertion will be as small as possible—if made.  Bills presented at the office will be paid.                                                                 I.R.F.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, June 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 6

Wool for Thread.

We will give one bunch of cotton yarn for four lbs. of Wool.  This arrangement will continue until due notice is given in this paper.
June 3.                                                                                                    John S. Linton, Agent.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, June 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 6

Wool for Thread.

We will give one bunch of cotton yarn for four lbs. of Wool.  This arrangement will continue until due notice is given in this paper.
June 3.                                                                                                    John S. Linton, Agent. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, June 10, 1863, p. 3, c. 5
For the Ladies.--Fine bleached homespun, linen handkerchiefs, stay binding, needles, pins, knitting pins, just received and for sale by  [June 10]                                           I. M. Kenney.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 12, 1863, p. 2, c. 8
Flax Thread.  Black, white, and drab, on spools for machine and hand sewing of superior quality.  For sale by                                                                                                W. F. Herring & Co.,
                               
                                                                                                Atlanta, Ga. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 3

Shirtings, Osnaburgs,
and Yarns,

From the Curtright Manufacturing Company, Greene county, Georgia, for sale by
                                                                                                                               
Cohen & Hertz.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, July 13, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

                                                                Donation to Soldiers' Families.

                We inadvertently failed to notice last week that the Athens Manufacturing Company had presented to the families of each of the soldiers who receive their pay in Athens, through Mr. F.  W. Lucas, one bunch of spun yarn, one hundred and thirty-seven bunches in all. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, August 1, 1863, p. 1, c. 6
                                                                                                          
Tuscaloosa, July 24th, 1863
. . . There are black spots in the State where Confederate money will not purchase the necessaries of life--_____ county is one point.  This county has chosen to establish a currency heretofore unknown—the thread currency.  I will attempt to describe its operation.  The cotton factory at Tuscaloosa is the treasury and issuer of these thread notes.  About 50 bundles of cotton thread are here manufactured daily, and every other day a sale and distribution takes place, when 50 bundles or so are sold out to the greedy customers.  The distribution is now going on at that brick building where the Yankee prisoners were confined, and where you now view such a melange of carriages, horsemen and pedestrians.  Let us step into the crowd which bests the window.  The rich and poor are commingled.  The sewing woman is elbowing her way with the rich lady and the wife of the member of Congress.  The latter patiently exclaims, "I have waited here during three distributions and have been refused the poor pittance of a bundle."
               
The wealthy lady stoops from her carriage and directs her escort to tell Mr. Kirkman that Mrs. Richenoughtobuyyou desires a bundle as she returns at once to the country.  But the distribution is made by honest citizens, and if partiality is displayed it is not observable.  During much wrangling and dispute the fifty bundles are sold, the country people having the preference, at ten dollars the large or five dollars the small bundle, and the crowd of a hundred or so of unsuccessful persons disperse to try for better success upon the ensuing distribution day.  And why so eager for thread?  It is the currency of the country, and that thread seller is de facto the banker.
               
You will now see the sequel.  Here is a country wagon laden with vegetables and chickens calling at every house.  The huckster and the lady of the house converse together and thread is the only currency that will be taken.  A dollar per pound is asked for butter, half as much again is offered in Confederate money and refused.  The next housekeeper is more successful.  "How do you sell butter?"  Dollar a pound for thread.  "I'll give you six hanks of it for as many pounds of butter."   The offer is eagerly accepted, and the lady is content with her bargain, for a $10 bundle of thread contains 24 hanks which is good for as many pounds of butter, placing the latter at 40 cents per pound.  Such is the origin and operation of our thread currency.  To keep your table supplied you must present yourself at the thread distribution and continue to do so until successful, and then you have the panacea for all wants.        N'Importe. 

WASHINGTON [ARK] TELEGRAPH, August 5, 1863
For Sale.  40 barrels molasses, 2,000 pounds wool, 200 bunches spun thread.  W. S. and J. S. Burt.  Washington, Aug. 5, 1863. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, August 12, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

Cotton for Yarns.

                The Athens Manufacturing Co. will purchase cotton and pay a part in yarn.--Would prefer to purchase in lots of from 1 to 5 bales, in order that all may have an opportunity of supplying themselves with yarn.
                                                                                               
R. L. Bloomfield Agent A. M. co.
August 12.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, September 23, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

Notice!

The Athens Manufacturing company will only exchange Goods for wool, until further notice.
    
           Persons living in the first ward of the Town, can purchase Thread and Cloth on and after the first day of October, until further notice at Hutcheson & Hampton's.
                                                                               
R. L. Bloomfield, Agent, A. M. Co.
Sept. 23.
 

 MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 27, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

An Appeal to the People of Mobile in
Favor of the Confederate Society.
[Continued.]

                . . . Next come the cotton manufacturers who, like the leather dealers, are governed by no rule except the "iron rule."  For example, in 1861 their charge for spinning yarn over and above the cost of the raw cotton, was ten cents per pound, they next rose to twenty cents for the same work, then to forty, then eighty, then one fifty, and now two dollars to two dollars and fifty cents for doing the same work which they did for ten cents in 1861.  They now realise [sic] twenty-five times as much money for spinning one pound of raw cotton as they did two years ago. . .
                                                                                                               
A True Confederate. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, October 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

Factory Yarn

Will be exchanged for desirable family supplies.                                            I.M. Kenney.
Oct. 15. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 4, 1863, p. 3, c. 6
               
Where does it come from?—There is not a factory within a day's travel of this or any other city, where a person can get more than an occasional bunch of thread, while nearly every retail dealer in the city has his shelves piled up with it.  Hence the query, where does it come from?  The only way in which we can solve it is, that these dealers pay the factory prices, with the promise to say nothing bout it—and this enables the manufacturer to evade the law, which allows him hands to carry on his establishment, on condition that he does not charge over 75 per cent. profit.  We do not know that this is the case, but suspicion strongly points to the culpability of these parties in this matter.
               
The Upson Factory allows every head of a family, in that and the adjoining counties, two bunches every two months—which greatly aids the people in that vicinity to get along in these hard times tolerably well.  If other manufacturing companies would do the same thing, there would be much suffering, to say nothing of complaints, obviated.
               
If retail dealers can get thread to sell, why cannot others get it to weave into cloth for their own use?  The per cent., we apprehend, is not enough—and the fear that some one will peach, prevents a more liberal policy on the part of manufacturers.
 

ATLANTA [GA] DAILY INTELLIGENCER, November 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
    
           Where Does it Come From?--There is not a factory within a day's travel of this or any other city where a person can get more than an occasional bunch of thread, while nearly every retail dealer in the city has his shelves piled up with it.  Hence the query, where does it come from?  The only way in which we can solve it is that these dealers pay the factory prices, with the promise to say nothing about it; and this enables the manufacturer to evade the law, which allows him hands to carry on his establishment on condition that he does not charge over 75 per cen. profit.  We do not know that this is the case, but suspicion strongly points to the culpability of these parties in the matter.
    
           The Upson Factory allows every head of a family in that and the adjoining counties two bunches every 2 months, which greatly aids the people in that vicinity to get along in these hard times tolerably well.  If other manufacturing companies would do the same thing there would be much suffering, to say nothing of complaints, obviated.
   
             If retail dealers can get thread to sell, why cannot others get it to weave into cloth for their own use?  The per cent., we apprehend, is not enough; and the fear that some will *peach* [sic?] prevents a more liberal policy on the part of manufacturers.--Col. Enq.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, November 18, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

Notice to Ministers.

All ministers residing in Oglethorpe, Madison, Hart, Franklin, Banks, Jackson, Hall, Lumpkin, Habersham, Rabun, Union and White counties, can purchase a limited supply of cloth and yarns at Hutcheson & Hampton's.  A certificate from any minister in the town of Athens, or Clerk of the Inferior Court, setting forth that the applicant is an ordained Minister, and whose only means of support is preaching the gospel, will be taken as evidence.  The number of their family will be required, white and black.
                                                                                                               
R. L. Bloomfield,
Nov. 18.                                                                                                               Agent A. M. Co.
 

ATLANTA [GA] DAILY INTELLIGENCER, November 22, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
Just received from Wilmington, N. C.--The following goods bought there at prices far below goods at last auction, and which will be sold accordingly: . . .
10 cases Clarks Thread, 200 yards . .
Together with a large stock of other goods to which we invite the attention of our friends and customers.
                                                                                               
A. Gunst & Bro.
               
                                                                                                Whitehall street.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 24, 1863, p. 4, c. 2
               
Spun Cotton.—The act of 15th April, 1863, authorized the Governor to expend $100,000 in the purchase of Cotton Yarns, to be distributed among soldiers' families who were reported by 1st of June.  The Inferior Court having reported 250 families in Muscogee county, of this description, and no Yarns having been supplied, Mr. Russell offered a resolution on Wednesday, requesting the Governor to have the due proportion furnished out of the $2,500,000 fund set apart for the support of indigent soldiers' families.—Sou. Recorder.
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 6
               
A New Cotton Mill.—The public will be gratified to learn, says the Lynchburg Republican, that a cotton factory is completed and is now turning out yarns near this city.  The enterprise is due to Messrs. Nowlin & Murrelli, and that it will be a complete success no one can doubt.  They have gone quietly to work, and the first intimation the public have of it is in the shape of yarns spun almost at their doors.  They deserve great credit for their enterprise and energy in getting it up.
 

ALBANY [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, December 9, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

                                                                Notice.

The Athens Manufacturing Co. having taken twenty-five thousand pair of pants to dye for the Government, they will not be able to dye any more yarns or garments for our customers.                                                                                     R. L.  Bloomfield, Agent.
Dec. 9.

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, January 27, 1864, p. 1, c. 8
               
A lady writes to the Savannah Republican:
               
In your issue of January 11th, you inserted an article from the Mobile Register, under the caption, "Awake to duty."  You will not object if I remonstrate a little against one conclusion drawn therein.
               
"If," says the writer, "we could see the ladies plying their needles, presenting flags, etc., etc. then we should have hope of our country."
               
Now I assure you the ladies are not weary sewing for the soldiers, but the materials have risen beyond their means.  When the war began, our wardrobes were supplied with calico dresses, our houses with blankets, and besides these the country was full of goods at moderate prices.  But now (three years later) how is it?  Many of our dresses have been converted into shirts and comforts for the soldiers, the blankets have been sent to the army, and in some instances, where these have failed, carpets have been contributed.  Many of the stores are entirely shut, and those which are still open charge such terrific prices that only the very wealthy can buy.  Only think of a yard of calico costing $10, a spool of thread $2.50, a bunch of factory warp $43, and other things in proportion.
               
Now are we less zealous because we sew less, when the materials are so far out of our reach?  If the government would furnish the materials, I am sure the ladies would be found ready and glad to do anything for the comfort of the soldiers.
               
No, sir, we are not less earnest than we were at first; we do not sympathize less with the brave defenders of freedom.  How can we be careless when our relatives and friends are still facing the foe?—When we think of "what subjugation means," can we cease being anxious until our liberty is established beyond the shadow of a doubt. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Clothing for the Army.

I am now prepared to exchange cotton yarns and shirting for jeans, blankets and wool.
                                                                                                          
J. Livingston, Major and Qm.
Feb. 10                                                                                                                   Athens, Ga.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, February 11, 1864, p. 3, c. 2
Call at the Albany Book Store, for School Books, Miscellaneous Books, Paper; Envelopes; Ink; Pens; Pencils; Pins, Needles; Thread; Knives, Purses; Powder, Shot and Caps; Playing Cards, Pipes; Clocks; Pictures; Picture Frames; Artist's Materials; Window Curtains, &c., &c., &c.
feb 11.                                                                    L. E. Welch & Co. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], February 19, 1864, p. 2, c. 6
Correspondence Houston Telegraph.]

                                                                                                               
Bonham, January 4, 1864.
    
           Editor Telegraph:  If there be an item of news here worth sending to you, I am not aware of it.
    
           I write to call attention to a fact I have here learned within a few days past.  This is the fact that flax grows finely in this country.  Several persons grew it successfully last spring, and afterward dressed it, making some into thread and some into linen.
    
           One lady, twelve miles from this town, has made a hundred yards of flax linen and a large lot of thread from her crop.  It was grown on sandy soil.  These are all the fact I have; but persons from Tennessee or any of the Western States, understand the cultivation, dressing and manufacture of flax.
    
           I shall endeavor to get some of the seed, if only a quart, and scatter by mail or otherwise in the lower country.  A small patch will turn out a large lot of thread.       R.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, February 24, 1864, p. 3, c. 4

Confederate States Armory, Cook & Bro.,

Being employed in the manufacture of Arms in the Confederate Government, and having a large number of men in their employ, who must be supplied with bread, would propose to the planters of Clarke and adjoining counties to exchange the following articles for CORN:
Factory Thread, Leather, Iron, Bacon, Salt, Sugar Boilers, &c.
Feb. 24.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], February 25, 1864, p. 1, c. 7
Shoe Thread.--To Make Shoe Thread out of Cotton--Spin the thread very fine, well twisted in spinning--put eight strands together and twist on the wheel.  Let the broach roll in starch as the tread is wound in balls.  It is best to use a needle in sewing.  The gentleman furnishing this receipt says that it will wear longer than flax shoe thread, having made and used it himself.  The thread can be colored by dying [sic]. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, March 23, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Drugs, Medicines, Dye-Stuffs,
Factory Thread, Cotton Cards,
Calicoes, Ginghams, Spool Thread, &c.
Combs, Brushes,
Pins, Needles, Hooks and Eyes,
Pencils, Stationery, Salt, &c.

Call at the Drug Store, Carnesville, GA.
S. H. Watson, Druggist and Physician.
march 23.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, March 30, 1864, p. 3, c. 4
Dogwood Poles Wanted!!  We will pay 18c per pole for dogwood poles 8 to 10 feet long, 3 to 4 inches thick at the large end--or we will give a bunch of thread for 200 poles, delivered at the Bobbin Mills.
March 30.                                                                                              E. J. McCall & Co.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 5, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
               
Manufactory of Socks in Georgia.—The city of Columbus, Ga., figures most prominently among the cities and towns that are exhibiting in local enterprises and factories encouraging evidence of our ability and resources wherever we find men of faith and spirit willing to try to help themselves and the cause, without exclusive reliance on Nassau and New York.  From the Columbus Times, we take some reports: . . .
               
The yarn mostly used for soldiers' wear is prepared by the Eagle Factory, though they work up a considerable amount prepared by private hands.  The finest yarn used is prepared by the Macon and Tallahassee Factories, though they have not been able to effect arrangements by which to obtain a regular supply of this material, and only use it in filling out private contracts.  They also use various other qualities of yarn furnished by private individuals.  The work done is generally in accordance with the material furnished. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, April 6, 1864, p. 3, c. 6

Notice.

                                                                                                Athens Factory, April 4, 1864.
All persons living in the town of Athens can purchase one-half a bunch of yarn or seven and a half yards of cloth, at T. H. Wilson & Bro's. New Currency and small bills only, taken in payment.                                                                  R. L. Bloomfield.
April 6.                                                                                   Agent A. M. Co.
Factory Thread and Salt.--To be exchanged for Flour, Bacon, Lard, Tallow, Wheat, Corn &c.
April 6.                                                                                   I. M. Kenney.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, April 14, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
Hides Wanted by Cook &  Bro., at the Confederate States Armory at Athens, Georgia, for which a liberal exchange will be given of Bacon, Thread, Syrup Boilers and Mills, or payable in new currency.  ap14. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, April 21, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Notice.

Just received and now offered for sale, the following choice articles:  76 boxes Tobacco, do. Smoking do. Cotton Yarn, for Bacon or money; Bar Soap and Toiletries; Potash; Flour, for Bacon or Lard; Ovens and Skillets, for Bacon, Lard, Hides, or Tallow; Fine cognac Brandy, Corn Whiskey, pure; Nails, by the keg; Snuff, by the jar; The finest Salt in the country, and other little articles.  Cooper & Fields, Albany, April 21, 1864. . .
               
For  Sale:  4 bbls. Cane Syrup; 10 bales Yarns, fine numbers; 100 Spinning Wheels; 5 bales Osnaburgs.  by J. W. Fears & Co., Macon, GA. apr 21. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, July 28, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
Salt, Cotton Cards, Calico, 4-4 Sheeting, Osnaburgs and Cotton Yarns, in exchange for Country Produce.  We will give one pair of Whittimore Cotton Cards for 12 1/2 bushels corn; one bushel Salt for 10 lbs bacon, 6 bushels corn or 2 1/2 gallons good syrup; one bunch cotton yarn for 15 lbs bacon, 20 lbs lard or 9 bushels corn; one yd Osnaburgs or 4-4 Sheeting for 1 1/4 lbs bacon, 1 3/4 lbs lard or 3/4 bushels corn; one yd Calico for 3 lbs bacon, 4 lbs lard, or 1 3/4 bushels corn; one pair ladies' gaiters for 3 1/4 lbs bacon, 44 lbs lard or 20 bushels corn; one lb good Tobacco for 1 bushel corn; 125 yds Osnaburgs for 1 bale good middling cotton of 500 lbs weight.  Wanted, eggs, butter and chickens, for which we will pay the market price in new issue.  Beers & Brinson.  Albany, Ga.--July 21st 1864. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 12, 1864, p. 3, c. 5
More New Goods.  Bleached homespun, spool thread, flax thread, fig. blue indigo, madder, copperas, logwood, bluestone, cotton cards, best article, cavalry spurs.  Pocket and case knives, tooth brushes, sealing wax, gum camphor, pepper, spice, alum, castor oil, spts. turpentine, pistol caps, tobacco, sperm candles, factory thread, for money or barter.
                                                                                                               
I. M. Kenney. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, October 12, 1864, p. 3, c. 5
More New Goods.  Bleached homespun, spool thread, flax thread, fig. blue indigo, madder, copperas, logwood, bluestone, cotton cards, best article, cavalry spurs.  Pocket and case knives, tooth brushes, sealing wax, gum camphor, pepper, spice, alum, castor oil, spts. turpentine, pistol caps, tobacco, sperm candles, factory thread, for money or barter.
                                                                                                               
I. M. Kenney.
Oct. 12.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, October 13, 1864, p. 3, c. 2
Fancy Articles.  Consisting of Knitting Needles, Pins, Thread, Buttons.  Also, Fine English Stationery, Pencils, Pins, &c.  For sale at the Book Store.  Albany, Sept. 15th, 1864. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, November 3, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
Rye!  Rye!!  30 bushels rye, 2,000 bundles yarns, 2,000 pounds plow steel iron, 1,500 yds Gunny Bagging, 1,000 pounds cotton rope, 1,5000 pounds sole leather, 500 pounds upper leather, 200 brooms, 12,000 yds osnaburgs, 2,500 pounds English soda, 4,000 pounds choice sugar, 1,000 bushels salt, 2,000 pounds extra flour.  Apply to J. W. Fears & Co., November 3d, 1864. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, November 25, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
For Sale.  75 bales yarns--6 to 14's; 5 bales of sheeting, 1 6-6 sheeting; 100 bushels rye, 100 yards bagging, 6 bbls. sorghum syrup, 100 bushels oats, alum, Virginia and coat salt, 40 kegs nails--6's to 20's.  Apply to J W. Fears & co., Macon, Ga. Nov. 17th 1864.
Wanted to buy 3,000 pounds dry hides, 100 bbls. sorghum syrup, 50 bls ribbon cane syrup, tallow, bacon and lard, apply to J. W. Fears & Co., Macon Ga., Nov. 17th, 1864. 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN BANNER, January 18, 1865, p. 3, c. 2
Factory Notice.  The Athens Manufacturing Company will exchange yarn and cloth for all kinds of produce and cotton.                                             R. M. Bloomfield,
Jan. 18.                                                                                   Ag't. A. M. Co. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, February 1, 1865, p. 2, c. 2
               
We have received from the President of the Bastrop Manufacturing Company a sample of the thread which is now being spun by its machinery.  This thread is remarkably even, smooth and strong.  This we understand is the first thread spun, but when the establishment is in full operation, it is expected to produce a superior article.  Mr. S. S. Munger is the president of the company.
 

ATHENS [GA] SOUTHERN WATCHMAN, February 15, 1865, p. 3, c. 4
Salt, Thread, Nails, Hand Looms and a few Sugar Mills, to exchange for bacon, corn, wheat, and wood--all of which are now wanting to supply the families of our workmen.
                                                                               
R. Nickerson, Agent.
Feb.15                                                                    Athens Foundry and Machine Works. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, March 22, 1865, p. 2, c. 5

Spring Goods!
Varied Assortment!

Consisting of the following--. . . Coats' cotton & flax thread . . ., Just received and for sale by Sampson & Hendricks, Congress Avenue, Austin, March 21, 1865.                 

To Shoemakers!

On hand and in transit, a large supply of Shoemakers' Thread, of the best quality.
For sale by Sampson & Henricks.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 31, 1865, p. 4, c. 4
                                                                                                               
[For the News.

To the Soldiers of Texas.

                Capt. E. W. Taylor has been greatly censured by you for not "issuing" the goods which were taken from his office on last Tuesday.  It is due to Capt. Taylor, and to the truth, that I should state that I received from the Rio Grande 84 bales and 25 boxes of dry goods, including gray cloth, flannel, domestic and tweeds, and that I purchased from the steamer "Flamingo" 65 bales of blankets, 5 large cases of thread, and 20,000 yards of gray flannel, all of which were turned over to Capt. Taylor only ten days before the excitement in Houston.  Most of the goods, taken from his office, were the goods he had just received.
               
I make this statement in justice to a faithful officer.  Where I am known, the statement will be accepted as true.                                                                                              B. R. Davis,
               
Receiving and Distributing Officer, for Goods from the Rio Grande and by the Blockade.