Drugs and Drug Substitutes in the South
Articles from Civil War Newspapers
 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, January 7, 1860, p. 4, c. 1          
            To Cure Sore Throat.—Take the whites of two eggs and beat them with two spoonsful of white sugar; grate in a little nutmeg, and then add a pint of luke warm water.  Stir well, and drink often.  Repeat the prescription if necessary, and it will cure the most obstinate case of hoarseness in a short time. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], February 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 2
            Valuable Recipe for Dysentery--Take of peach leaves one handful, pour one pint of boiling water over them; then add one tablespoonful of Epson Salts.  Take a wine glass full every two or three hours till it operates freely; then take the tea without the salts three times a day until cured.  The tea must be cold when the salt is put.  

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 1, 1860, p. 1, c. 8 
            To Keep Off Musketoes.—Camphor is the most powerful agent to drive away musketoes.  A camphor bag hung up in an open casement will prove an effectual barrier to their entrance.  Camphorated spirit applied as perfume to the face and hands will act as an effectual preventative; but when bitten by them aromatic vinegar is the best antidote. 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, February 2, 1861, p. 2, c. 3

Fresh Drugs!

            J. B. Lancaster & Co., are now receiving, direct from New Orleans, an additional supply of Fresh and Pure Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Fancy Goods, Perfumery, &c. 
            They keep constantly on hand all articles usually kept in their line, a few of which they would call special attention to, such as Paregoric, Laudanum, Castor, Sweet, Lard, Train, and Linseed Oils; Sulphur, Cayenne Pepper, Sulph. Quinine, Morphine, Strychnia; Salecine, Piperine, Blue Mass, Calomel, Ipecac, and Opium.  The various preparations of Iron, Iodides, and Magnesia, and Extracts for Culinary, Toilet, and Medicinal purposes.

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], March 7, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
            The Importation of Opium.--One of the curious facts revealed by the publication of Custom House tables is that there was imported into the country last year, three hundred thousand pounds of opium.  Of this amount it is estimated, from reliable data, that not more than one tenth is used for medical purposes.  The habit of eating opium is known to be spreading rapidly among lawyers, doctors, clergymen and literary men, and enormous quantities are used by the manufacturers of those poisonous liquids which are dealt out in drinks in the saloons and groceries that infest every city and village in the country.

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], April 13, 1861, p. 2, c. 5
            Infallible Cure for Toothache.--Among the many diseases that humanity is heir to, there are scarcely any which in violent pain and acute suffering, rival the toothache.  And yet, as far as we are able to judge, though the affection is common to all, but a few are aware of the fact, that other remedies exist besides the extraction of the tooth, which if only tried, will be found infallible.  The following, for instance, suggested to us by a friend, will, if his experience and veracity are worth anything, prove invaluable in the relief of this torment:  Take equal quantities of alum and common salt, pulverize and mix them, and apply them to the hollow tooth on a wet piece of cotton.  The remedy is very simple, very cheap, and within the reach of all.  If any one will try it he will find it infallible.--Petersburg Express.   

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, July 3, 1861, p. 3, c. 4         
            A Cure for Diarrhoea.—Numerous requests having been made to republish the recipe for diarrhoea and cholera symptoms, which we gave in our paper weeks ago, and which was used by the troops during the Mexican war with great success, we give it below, with a very important correction of an error made in the first formula, as to the size of the dose to be given.   
Laudanum                                           2 ounces.
Spirits of Champhor [sic]                    2 ounces.
Essence of Peppermint                        2 ounces.
Hoffman's Anodyne                            2 ounces.
Tincture of Cayenne Pepper                2 ounces.
Tincture of Ginger                               1 ounce. 
            Mix all together.  Dose—a teaspoonful in a little water, or a half teaspoonful, repeated in an hour afterwards, in a tablespoonful of brandy.—This preparation will check diarrhoea in ten minutes, and abate other premonitory symptoms of cholera immediately.  In cases of cholera it has been used with great success, to restore reaction, by outward application.—Phila. Inquirer. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 9, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cordial for our soldiers.--An army surgeon suggests the propriety of friends sending "black berry cordial," having the following ingredients--cloves--cinnamon, allspice and ginger--to their soldier friends.  The suggestion is doubtless a good one, and needs only to be mentioned to be put in execution by the devoted and patriotic women of our land. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], July 20, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
               
Antidote for Intermittent Fever--Substitute for Quinine--Dr. D. B. Phillips, late of the United States Navy, now of the Confederate Navy, says:

               
"Raw corn meal unsifted and freshly ground, administered in doses of a large table spoonful six or eight times a day, or a tea made of fodder, is an admirable remedy in intermittent fever.--The yellow corn is the better variety, and a drink made of a table spoonful of the meal stirred in a glass of water and taken frequently, is not only a good remedy but a pleasant and refreshing beverage, which may be taken in all stages of the disease without the slightest evil effects. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, July 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 2
               
A correspondent of the Peedee Times recommends the Boneset (Eupatorium Perfoliatum) as a substitute for quinine.  It is a valuable suggestion; let our Lady Bountifuls see to gathering and drying it. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], August 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
               
Medicines for the Army.--An experienced Army Surgeon in Virginia gives the following list of articles much needed by the sick and the wounded.  He says:
               
Such persons as are inclined to do so, can contribute to the necessities of the sick and wounded, should we get into a battle, by making up a box of bandages, and furnishing any amount of almost any kind of medicines.  A package of bandages might be made up as follows:  Take a piece of coarse, unbleached sheeting from eight to ten yards long, and tear into strips--
                               
1 dozen,                                 1/2 inch wide,
                               
2  "                                          2 inches wide
                               
3  "                                          2 1/2  "    "
                               
4  "                                          3        "    "
                               
4  "                                          4         "   "
               
These should be rolled tightly and the loose end pinned.
               
Several pounds of tow.
               
Curved splints of all sorts.
               
Oil cloths, 20 dozen.
               
Pillow cases, 2 dozen.
               
Pillow ticks, 2 dozen.
               
Sheets, 4 dozen.
               
Flannel, a bolt.  All are needed.
               
Should any one take a notion to fit out a box of medicine and hospital stores, the annexed is a list of the articles most needed:

For a Regiment.

                Simple Ceraie,                                                                       10 pounds.
               
Basilicon Ointment                                                                   5      "
               
Chloroform,                                                                             2     "
               
Creosote,                                                                                6 ounces.
               
Liquor Ammoniaie,                                                                  5 pounds.
               
Blue Mass,                                                                              1 pound.
               
Morphine                                                                                5 drhms.
               
Spts. Turpentine,                                                                     5 gallons.
               
Sugar of Lead,                                                                        2 pounds.
               
Powd. Gum Arabic,                                                                4      "
               
"        Cayenne Pepper,                                                           1/2 pound.
               
"       Ipicac,                                                                            1     "
               
Dover's Powder                                                                      1     "
               
Powd. Opium,                                                                         2 pounds.
               
"     Mustard,                                                                           12      "
               
Crushed Sugar,                                                                        25      "
               
Spirits of Nitre,                                                                        1/2 gallon.
               
Brandy (good),                                                                        24 bottles.
               
Wine, Port, Madeira, or Sherry,                                               24 bottles.
               
Bourbon Whiskey.                                                                   24 bottles.
               
Opium Gum,                                                                            2 pounds.
               
Sabaraque's Disinfectant                                                           3 bottles.
               
Chloride of Lime,                                                                     5 pounds.
               
Seidlitz Powders,
               
Laudanum,                       }
               
Paregoric,                        }
               
Es. Peppermint,                }    Any quantity.
               
Tinct. Capsicum,              }
               
Liniments,                        }
               
Cathartic Pills,                 }
               
The foregoing is an imperfect list, but may serve as a sort of guide for any person who may be moved by feelings of benevolence or duty to get up supplies for a regiment.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], September 3, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
            Slippery elm bark is needed in large quantities for poultices.  Let it be provided in advance and contributed for the service of our camp by those who find the tree in their neighborhood.
   

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, September 4, 1861, p. 3, c. 3 
            Dysentery.—We find in an exchange the following remedy for this disease, furnished by an old lady:           
            "Please insert in your paper a remedy for the cure of the dysentery for the soldiers that is sick with that disease.  Take a piece of mutton suit, half the bigness of a hickory nut, and boil it in a cup of sweet milk, and drink it, and repeat it till cured; it is a certain remedy." 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], September 13, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
            The Committee of the Georgia Relief and Hospital Association have been called on for Thyme, Red Peppers and Orange leaves.  Will the kind ladies of Augusta, having these articles, send a small lot of each to the store of Plumb & Leitner to-day, or as early as possible? as they are much needed for the hospital in Richmond.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 14, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
                Substitute for quinine.  Dr. D. B. Phillips, late of the United States Navy, now of the Confederate Navy, says:
   
             "Raw corn meal unsifted, and freshly ground, administered in doses of a large tablespoonful six or eight times a day, or a tea made of fodder, is an admirable remedy in intermittent fever.  The yellow corn is the better variety, and a drink made of the tablespoonful of the meal, stirred in a glass of water, and taken frequently, is not only a good remedy but a pleasant and refreshing beverage, which may be taken in all stages of the disease without the slightest evil effect. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 17, 1861, p. 1, c. 8
               
A Simple Salve for Soldiers' Feet in Marching.--The _Scientific American_ has received the following receipt for making an excellent composition for annointing the feet of the soldiers during long marching:  Take equal parts of gum camphor, olive oil and pure beeswax, and mix them together warm until they are united and become a salve.  At night wash the feet well, dry them, and apply the salve, and put on clean stockings and sleep with them on.  Next day the feet will be in excellent trim for marching. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 19, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
                Prepare it in time.  Slippery elm bark is needed in large quantities for poultices, for which purpose it is exceedingly valuable.  Let it be provided in advance, and contributed for the service of our camps by those who find the tree in their neighborhood. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 21, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
                Typhoid fever in the army.  Messrs. Editors:  Every day we hear the sad tidings of death among our boys in the army, from that scourge, Typhoid Fever.  A gentleman of the medical profession, now in our city, a citizen of Texas, expresses his surprise that the potent remedy of Spirits of Turpentine has made so little progress in the country for the cure of this ailment.  My friend Dr. R., a man of splendid professional ability, says that if any remedy can ever be called a specific, Spirits of Turpentine may be so considered in cases of Typhoid Fever.
    
           He begins with small doses of about ten drops every two hours, and continue the remedy in larger doses, giving as high as a teaspoonful at a dose, till the right action is seen on the skin.  Spirits of Nitre may be needed to relieve the stranury apt to follow the administration of turpentine, but nothing further is ever needed.--Atlanta Confederacy.
    
           We will add our humble testimony to the efficiency of this remedy.  During a serious spell of Billious fever, from which we suffered for several weeks, last summer, the use of turpentine mainly, brought us out safe and sound. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 27, 1861, p. 1, c. 4
                A Simple Salve for Soldiers' Feet in Marching.  The Scientific American has received the following receipt for making an excellent composition for annointing the feet of soldiers during long marching.  Take equal parts of gum camphor, olive oil and pure beeswax, and mix them together warm until they are united and become a salve.  At night wash the feet well--dry them and apply the salve, and put on clean stockings and sleep with them on.  Next day the feet will be in excellent trim for marching.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 3, 1861, p. 2, c. 2 
            A Simple Salve for Soldiers' Feet in Marching.—The Scientific American has received the following receipt for making an excellent composition for anointing the feet of soldiers during long marching:  Take equal parts of gum camphor, olive oil and pure beeswax, and mix them together warm until they are united and become a salve.  At night wash the feet well, dry them and apply the salve, and put on clean stockings and sleep with them on.  Next day the feet will be in excellent trim for marching. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], October 6, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
    
           The willow bark, the bark of the root of the wild plum, and piperine, can be advantageously used as substitutes for Quinine.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 10, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

                                                                                         Nashville, Hempstead Co., Ark.,     }                   
                                                                                        Sept. 18th, 1861.                             }          
            Editor True Democrat—Is it not strange the surgeons in our army permit so many valuable lives lost from the effects of measels [sic], when a little whisky toddy would lessen the mortality at least one-half or three-fourths.  All that is required is to keep the patient's blood warm with the toddy throughout the disease.           
            As Lincoln has proclaimed medicines contraband of war, permit [me] to say to those whom it may concern, that vervinex is a very good substitute for quinine, which may be found at the road sides in the unplowed field and in open waste lands.  A strong decoction should be used—it is very bitter.               
                                    *           

TENNESSEE BAPTIST, October 19, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

Dogwood Bark.

            The Statesville Express says, that Lieut. Colonel John A. Young of the 4th Regiment North Carolina State Troops, urges the importance of furnishing the army at Manassas with a large supply of Dogwood root bark as a substitute for quinine.  We can say, from considerable experience, that dogwood bark, steeped in water or spirits, is the best remedy for chills and fevers we ever saw.  

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 22, 1861, p. 1, c. 7
               
The willow bark, the bark of the root of the wild plum, and the piperine can be advantageously used as substitutes for quinine.  A Mr. Dance, of Texas, has made quinine from a tree common to our Southern forest.  The Houston (Texas) Telegraph thinks it is made from the prickly ash.  In its taste it has the same long, lingering, bitter sensations that quinine leaves.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 4 
            A Mr. Dance of Texas has made quinine from a tree common to our southern forests.  The Houston Telegraph thinks it is from the prickly ash. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 6

A Remedy for Measles.

            Mr. Editor—As the above disease is now prevailing among our troops generally, you are at liberty, if you think proper, to insert the following remedy, which I can assure my brother practitioners they will find highly efficacious in the speedy and successful management of the measles at home or in the tented field.  Any thing for the benefit of our gallant soldier boys.  Our usual formula is one drachm of carbonate of ammonia (solid hartshorn) added to an ounce and a half of camphor water.  Give a teaspoonfull three or four times a day, varying the dose according to age and other circumstances.  it should be given early, if possible, before the eruption appears.                       
                                                                                                        G. D. Hodge, M. D.    
Holly Springs, Ark., Oct. 15, 1861. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 4, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Wanted for the  Soldiers

                A supply of Sage and Red Pepper, which is much needed in one of the hospitals on the coast.  Housekeepers and gardeners in the vicinity have an abundance of these articles, and if they will deliver them at the Republican Office, as a contribution to the sick soldiers, they will be promptly forwarded.  Immediate attention is requested.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, November 16, 1861, p. 4, c. 1 
            An Effectual Cure for the Ear-Ache.—Take a small piece of cotton batting or cotton wool, make a depression in the center with the end of the finger, and fill it with as much ground pepper as will rest on a five cent piece, gather it into a ball and tie it up, dip the ball into sweet oil and insert in the ear, covering the latter with cotton wool, and use a bandage or cap to retain it in its place.  Almost instant relief will be experienced, and the application is so gentle that an infant will not be injured by it, but experience relief as well as adults.  So says an exchange.  

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 6, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Castor Oil--How Made.

                The following communication to the Houston Telegraph, from Mr. E. T. Duffau, of Austin, will be read with interest:
               
... The following is the process for preparing it on a large scale:  The seeds having been cleansed from dust and fragments of capsules, are conveyed into a shallow iron reservoir, where they are submitted to a gentle heat, insufficient to scorch them, and not greater than can be borne by the hand; the object of this step is to render the oil sufficiently liquid for easy expression; the seeds are then introduced into a powerful screw press.  One bushel of good seed will yield about six quarts of the best oil.
    
           The yield of the seed is from 40 to 60 bushels to the acre, or say 75 gallons of oil, which, at the low price of $1 per gallon, is $75 to the acre.
    
           The mode of cultivation is to plant and attend to the crop the same as corn, thinning out to two stalks in a hill, and leaving a space between the rows of four feet.
    
           The oil will give about 10 or 12 per cent. more light than lard oil, and can be used in the same lamps.
    
           The plant may be found growing in Texas almost anywhere.  There are stalks of it in the streets of Austin, and on my visit to your city I found it all along the roads. 
    
           From the statement I make, you will at once see that it will pay better than any crop which can be planted in Texas. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], December 18, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
A respected correspondent sends us the following, which he says is a specific cure for Dyspepsia and all derangements of the liver.  The materials can be found in any drug store.  He says:

               
"It may be used with impunity for an indefinite time.  1 oz. of Liverwort, 1 do Black Root, 1 do Black Snakeroot, 1 1/2 do Senna.  Mix these several articles together, and put them in a large pitcher or any other convenient vessel, pour over them five half-pints (or a quart and half-pint) of boiling water, cover the vessel closely and set it away.  After steeping 18 or 20 hours, stirring occasionally during that time, strain it through a coarse cloth, and then add about a half-pint of good brandy, or some other good spirits.  Bottle, and in the summer or warm weather in the winter, keep it in a cool place to prevent it from souring.  Dose, a table spoon full three times a day, and always immediately after eating.  Some constitutions may require a little more, and others a little less; each one must adjust the dose to suit themselves.  There is no harm in the remedy, and if necessary it should be persisted in for weeks and months."         Philos.   

TENNESSEE BAPTIST, December 21, 1861, p. 4, c. 3 
            For Rheumatics, Neuralgia, and Nervous Headache.—Mix one ounce oil rosemary; one ounce oil cloves; one ounce oil oreganum; one ounce spirits turpentine, one ounce spirits hartshorn; one ounce tincture cantharides; one ounce alcohol.  Shake and pour a little in a saucer; set the saucer on embers, and rub in on the affected part with your hand.  Warm your hand by a shovel of coals and hold it on the affected part to encourage absorption.  The price of the compound should only be one dollar.  

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 26, 1861, p. 2, c. 5 
            The following from the Napoleon Planter, is worth trying:  
            Napoleon Planter:  I send you what my neighbors are using as a substitute for quinine in common cases of chill and fever.           
            Take a pint of cotton seed and pound them well, then add a pint and a half of water and simmer down to one pint.           
            All speak well of it and use nothing else now.         
            Dose—A wine glass full every two hours.
Auburn, Ark., Nov. 23, 1861. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 28, 1861, p. 3, c. 3
               
A certain cure for coughs.--A remedy never known to fail:  Three cents' worth of liquourice; three cents' worth of rock candy; three cents' worth of gum arabic.  Put them in a quart of water, simmer them till thoroughly dissolved; then add three cents' worth of paregoric, and a like quantity of antimonial wine.  Let it cool, and sip whenever the cough is troublesome.  It is pleasant, infallible, cheap and good.  

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, January 16, 1862, p. 3, c. 6 
            We forget what paper we clipped the following from, but as dyspepsia is so common a disease among our people, it may be of interest and value to our readers.           
            A respected correspondent sends us the following which he says is a specific cure for dyspepsia and all derangements of the liver.  The materials can be found in any drug store.  He says.   
            "It may be used with impunity for an indefinite time.  1 oz. of Liverwort, 1 do. Black Root, 1 do. Black Snakeroot, 1½ do. Senna.  Mix these several articles together, and put them in a large pitcher or any other convenient vessel, pour over them five half pints (or a quart and a half pint) of boiling water, cover the vessel closely and set it away.  After steeping 18 or 20 hours, stirring occasionally during that time, strain it through a coarse cloth, and then add about a half pint of good brandy, or some other good spirits.  Bottle, and in the summer or warm weather in the winter, keep it in a cool place to prevent it from souring.  Dose, a table spoonful three times a day, and always immediately after eating.  Some constitutions may require a little more, and others a little less; each one must adjust the dose to suit themselves.  There is no harm in the remedy, and if necessary, it should be persisted in for weeks and months.                       
                                                                                                                        Philos. 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, February 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 2 
            Infallible Cure for Toothache.—Take equal quantities of alum and common salt, pulverize and mix them, and apply them to the hollow tooth on a piece of cotton.  The remedy is very simple, very cheap, and within the reach of all.  If any one will try it he will find it infallible.—Petersburg Express.  

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, March 1, 1862, p. 4, c. 1          
            New Remedy for Neuralgia.—The Journal de Chimie Medicale contains an account of the discovery of a new and powerful sedative in neuralgia, just discovered by Dr. Field.  The substance used is nitrate of oxide and glycile, and is obtained by treating glycerine at a low temperature with sulphuric or nitric acid.  One drop mixed with ninety-nine drops of wine, constitutes the first dilution.  A case of neuralgia in an old lady, which had resisted every known remedy, was completely cured by this new agent.  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Castor Oil.—A druggist tells us that this article is very scarce and dear, yet nothing grows more luxuriantly or is more easily cultivated on every plantation in the South than the Palm Christi plant, out of which it is made.—The two facts taken together is almost ludicrous.  They make striking commentary upon the absurd and slavish policy which we of the South have so long been pursuing of depending almost exclusively upon others for what can be easily and cheaply made at home.  Castor oil ought to be twice as cheap in the South as in the North.  Importing it is like importing fresh tomatoes and okra in hermitrically [sic] sealed cans, while these articles will grow much better here than in the places from which they are brought!
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Sore Throats--Salt as a Remedy.--In these days, when diseases of the throat are so prevalent and in many cases so fatal, the use of common salt is recommended as an effectual remedy.  We commenced by using it three times a day--morning, noon, and night.  We dissolved a large tablespoonful of pure table salt in about half a tumbler full of cold water.  With this we gargled the throat most thoroughly before meal time.  The result has been that during the entire winter we were not only free from the usual coughs and colds to which, so far as my memory extends, we have always been subject, but the dry, hacking cough has entirely disappeared.  We attribute this satisfactory result entirely to the salt gargle. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 15, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Castor Oil.—The New Orleans Crescent has been furnished with the following recipes for preparing castor oil from the castor bean:
               
Strip the seeds of their husks or pods; then bruise them in mortars.  Afterwards they are to be tied in linen bags, and boiled in water until the oil which they contain rises to the surface.  This is carefully skimmed off, strained, to free it from any accidental impurities, and bottled for use.  Pressed castor oil is obtained like almond oil, by bruising the seeds into paste with water, and distilling the mixture, when the oil passes over.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], April 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
                To Wounded Soldiers.--The Rockingham Register says that the pain caused by gunshot wounds, and wounds of any kind, will be relieved almost instantaneously by holding that part affected over smoking lard.  Put the lard on burning coals in a shovel or pan convenient to handle, and let the wounded part be brought as close as possible to the lard, the smoke and fumes arising from which will act like a charm upon the part affected.  The gentleman who informed the Register states that he has seen it tried repeatedly, and never know it to fail.  All who are suffering from wounds should try this simple and easily applied remedy. 

WASHINGTON [AR] TELEGRAPH, April 30, 1862
                CASTOR OIL.--Every farmer who can possibly procure seed should raise the "Palma Christi," or Castor Bean.  Otherwise we ill lack castor oil, an indispensable medicine.  It grows luxuriant here, and needs little attention.  The oil is easily expressed.  If the plants were raised it would pay to make the oil. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 10, 1862, p. 5, c. 2
    
           Substitute for Quinine--The extremely high price of quinine renders it very difficult for persons of moderate means to purchase it, and yet it has been considered almost indispensable for the cure of our summer and autumnal fevers.
    
           The best substitute for it, (if indeed it be not equal to the quinine itself) may be obtained with all ease by taking the inside bark of the red dogwood (thought to be preferable to the white dogwood) cut it up fine and put it into a kettle covered with pure water; then boil it down to the consistency of molasses or jelly.  During the process of boiling it should be strained once or twice to free it from all impurities.  After thus being boiled down it may be put away in bottles.  When wanted for use, it can easily be made into pills by mixing with flour.
    
           The writer of this has known three cases of severe chills and fevers cured within the last thirty days, by taking a few pills of three or four grams each, in twenty-four hours, taken every hour.
This information is obtained from an eminent Texas physician and chemist, who has thoroughly tested the preparation in his last year's practice--B.--Nat. Union.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
                Substitute for Quinine--The extremely high price for quinine renders it very difficult for persons of moderate means to purchase it, and yet it has been considered almost indispensable for the cure of our summer and autumnal fevers.
    
           The best substitute for it, (if indeed it be not equal to the quinine itself) may be obtained with all ease, by taking the inside bark of the red dogwood (thought to be preferable to the white dogwood) cut it up fine and put it into a kettle covered with pure water; then boil it down to the consistency of molasses or jelly.  During the process of boiling, it should be strained once or twice to free it from all impurities.  After thus being boiled down it may be put away in bottles.--When wanted for use, it can easily be made into pills by mixing with flour.
    
           The writer of this has known three cases of severe chills and fevers cured within the last thirty days, by taking a few pills of three or four grains each, in twenty four hours, taken every hour.
    
           This information is obtained from an eminent Texas physician and chemist, who has thoroughly tested the preparation in his last year's practice.--B.--Nat. Union.
   

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
A Substitute for Spanish Flies.--The present scarcity of Spanish flies for medical use in blister plasters, makes a proper substitute a desideratum.  A writer in the Savannah Republican says we have in this country many representatives of the same genus, and enumerates the blistering beetle, or potato fly, so prevalent in our gardens, and so injurious to vegetation, as efficacious.  He states:
               
The insect is of a dull, tawny or light yellowish color, with two black spots on the head, two black stripes on the thorax, and three broad ones on each wing cover.  The under side of the body, the legs, (excepting the first joint, which is yellowish), the antennae, or feelers, are black.  Its length is from 5 to 8 lines, its breadth of body 2 lines.  The body is quite soft.  These beetles are very shy, timid insects, and whenever disturbed fall immediately from the leaves, and attempt to conceal themselves among the grass, or draw up their long, slender legs and feign themselves dead.  In the night and in rainy weather they descend from the plants and burrow in the ground, or under leaves and tufts of grass.  It is, therefore, during clear weather, in the morning and evening, that they feed and are to be collected.  They should be killed by throwing them into scalding water, for one or two minutes, after which they would be spread upon cloth or paper to dry, and may be made profitable by selling them to the apothecaries for medical use. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
                Substitute for Quinine.--The difficulty of procuring an adequate supply of Quinine is causing attention to be directed to our native plants, possessing the same medicinal qualities.  A professional gentleman sends us the following description of one of these substitutes, which is no doubt valuable.  A fuller description of the tree would be acceptable, and also the different common names it is known by, as scarcely any plant or herb is known by the same name, in different localities:

From the North American Sylva.
Georgia Bark--Pinckneya Pubens.

                "This tree, still more interesting by the properties of its bark than by the elegance of its flowers and of its foliage, is indigenous to the most Southern parts of the United States; probably it grows also in  the two Floridas and in lower Louisiana.  My Father (Michaux) found it for the first time, in 1791 on the banks of the St. Mary's."  
               
"With a great affinity to the Cinchona, which yields the Peruvian Bark, my father discovered in the Georgia Bark sufficient differences to distinguish it as a new genus.  In testimony of gratitude and respect he consecrated it to Charles Cotesworth Pickney [sic?], an enlightened patron of the arts and sciences.
               
The Georgia Bark is a low tree, dividing itself into numerous branches, and rarely exceeding the height of twenty-five feet, and the diameter of five or six inches at the base.  It has been transplanted successfully at Charleston, S. C.  "Its inner bark is extremely bitter, and appears to partake of the febrifuge virtues of the Cinchona, for the inhabitants of the Southern parts of Georgia employ it successfully in the intermittent fevers, which during the latter part of Summer and Autumn prevail in the Southern States.  A handful of the bark is boiled in a quart of water 'till the liquid is reduced one half, and the infusion is administered to the sick."
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Notice--Barks Wanted.

                                                                                                Medical Purveyor's Office,
                                                                                                           
Atlanta, Ga., June 30, 1862.
                The best prices will be paid by the undersigned for large quantities of the following BARKS:
               
Stem, branches and root of Dogwood, (root preferred); branches and roots of White Willow; root, trunk and branches of American Poplar, (called also White-wood, Canoe-wood and tulip-tree,) root preferred.
               
These barks must be carefully dried and securely packed.  They may be brought to this office, or sent to Mr. L. W. Waller, Botanical Agent, Cartersville, Ga.; or Dr. W. W. Durham, Botanical Agent, Decatur, Ga.
                                                                                                               
George S. Blackie,
                                                                               
Surgeon and Medical Purveyor, C. S. A.
july1 tf
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
To Remove Maggots from Wounds.--As a matter of wide-spread interest at this time, we give place to the following:
               
Take the leaves, bark, flowers, or berries of the common elder (Sambacus niger), make a strong tea by pouring boiling water upon them, and letting them steep.  Wash the wounds once or twice a day with this.  Boil some lard, and, while boiling, stir in elder in considerable quantity, and strain off through a sieve of coarse cloth.  This makes an ointment for the same purpose.  It is improved by adding one-fourth as much common beeswax as the amount of lard used.
               
Antiseptic Powder.--To correct the offensive odors of wounds, mix one hundred parts of calcined plaster of paris and two parts of coal tar.  Rub well together.  Sprinkle this upon the wound once or twice daily.  They have been fully tested for years in the Bellevue Hospital. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, Mercury, July 14, 1862, p. 2, c.4

Medicinal Barks Wanted.

                The barks of the following plants are much wanted in the army, to be issued to the troops as a preventative of Country Fever:
               
Bark of the root of the dogwood.
               
Bark of the wild cherry.
               
Bark of the willow.
               
40 cents per pound will be paid for the above articles if properly dried and delivered to the Medical Purveyor in Charleston.                      
                                                                                                               
J. J. Chisolm,
               
July 9.                                                                                     Medical Purveyor C. S. A. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 20, 1862, p. 3, c. 4
               
To Remove Maggots From Wounds.--As a matter of wide-spread interest at this time, we give place to the following:
               
Take the leaves, bark, flowers, or berries of the common elder (Sambacus niger), make a strong tea by pouring boiling water upon them and letting them steep.  Wash the wounds once or twice a day with this.  Boil some lard, and while boiling stir in elder in considerable quantity, and strain off through a sieve or coarse cloth.  This makes an ointment for the same purpose.  It is improved by adding one-fourth as much common beeswax as the amount of lard used.
               
Antiseptic Powder.--To correct the offensive odors of wounds, mix one hundred parts of calcined plaster of Paris and two parts of coal tar.  Rub well together.  Sprinkle this upon the wound once or twice daily.  They have been fully tested for years in the Bellveue [sic] Hospital. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], June 28, 1862, p. 1, c. 8
                Epsom Salts.--Messrs. Sensabaugh, Mingus, & Long, says the Augusta Chronicle, send us a specimen of Epsom salts manufactured by them from a cave in Smokey mountain, between North Carolina and Tennessee.  They are now making 300 pounds of Epsom salts and 4000 pounds of alum daily.  The salts are said to be superior to any heretofore sold in the South, and the alum is equal.  The manufacturers say they will be able to supply the whole Southern Confederacy with these necessary articles. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
Flesh Wounds.--The following recipe for flesh wounds has proved very efficacious, and is recommended to the Medical Faculty as an experiment.  It has been practically tested by an officer in the French army, who was wounded in the arm, and in the space of eight days his wound was healed.  It is worth a trial:
               
Take a linen rag, in which cut small holes throughout, dip it in camphor oil, and apply it to the wounded parts.  Take finely powdered camphor and sprinkle over the linen--a piece of lint in camphor salve should then be applied over the wound.  Bandage the part wounded, and apply twice or three times a day.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, August 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 6
                                                                                                               
Confederate States of America,
                                                                                                               
Medical Purveyor's Office
                                                                               
                                   Savannah, July 31, 1862.

Wanted.

The following, for which the highest prices will be paid, delivered at either of my offices, in  Savannah or Macon:
Seneka Snake Root,                                             May Apple,
Blood Root,                                                          Butter Nut,
Wild Cherry Bark,                                                 Fever Root,
Indian Turnip Root,                                               American Hellebone,
Pleurisy Root                                                        Bitter Sweet,
Ipecac Root,                                                        Skunk Cabbage,
Blooming Spurge,                                                 Jamestown Weed,
Indian Physic,                                                       Hemlock,
Indian Tobacco, or Lobelia                                   Henbane,
Poke Root,                                                           Pipsissewa,
Cranesbill Root,                                                    Rearberry,
Marsh Rosemary,                                                 Flea Bane,
Deerberry, or Blackberry,                                     Scotch Broom,
White Oak  Bark,                                                 Pink Root,
Meadow Sweet,                                                   Jerusalem Oak Seed,
American Colombo,                                             Winter Green,
American Gentian,                                                Horse Mint,
Persimmon Bark,                                                  Flag Root,
Centerary (herb),                                                  Sassafras Root,
Boneset,                                                               Wild Ginger,
Virginia Snake Root,                                            Queen's Delight,
Dandelion,                                                            Slippery Elm,
Wild Senna Leaves,                                              Bene Leaves.
                                                                                    
W. H. Prioleau,
                                                                    
Asst. Surg. P.A.C.S., Med. Purveyor
                                                                               
     Fourth  Depot.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

                                                                                Confederate States of America,]
                                                                               
Medical Purveyor's Office,]
    
                                                                           Columbia, August 1st, 1862.]
               
The following prices will be paid for the following Medical Barks and Roots, if carefully gathered and dried, upon delivery at the Medical Purveyor's Office, 212 Main-street, Columbia:
Poplar Bark                                                            per lb      10 cts.
*Wild Cherry Bark                                                                80 "
*Dogwood Bark                                                                    80 "
*Sassafras Bark                                                                     25 "
*Persimmon  Bark                                                                 25 "
*Willow Bark                                                                        20 "
*Slippery Elm Bark                                                               30 "
*Red Oak Bark                                                                    10 "
Snake Root                                                                           50 "
Blackberry Root                                                                   30 "
Queen's Delight Root                                                            25 "
Blood Root                                                                           30 "
Bone Sett                                                                             10 "
Pleurisy Root                                                                        25 "
               
*The inner bark of the trunk and branches, or the bark of the root, is required.  The outer coarse bark from the trunk should be removed with a chaiding knife before the inner bark is peeled off.                                              J. J.  Chisolm,
August 4               mwf8                                                       Medical Purveyor. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Attention, Soldiers!--Fill your pockets with dried slippery elm bark when about to take up the line of march for the battle field, or for a new encampment.  You will find that chewing it freely will greatly allay both thirst and hunger.  The slippery elm grows in abundance in Virginia, North and South Carolina, and in Georgia.  Our Surgeons call for it as a substitute for Gum Arabic.  It is to be hoped our patriotic and philanthropic friends in the country will procure an abundant supply for our army.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 20, 1862, p. 3, c. 5
                Just Received and for Sale,
                Blue Stone, Quinine, Copperas; Morphine; Indigo; Castor Oil; Madder; Epsom Salts; Blacking; Soda; Prepared Chalk; Gum Camphor; Matches; Cinnamon; Toilet Soaps; Chloroform; Brushes; Snuff, &c., at R. M. Smith 8 Drug Store. No. 10 Broad street.
August 20. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], August 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
                Attention Soldiers!--Fill your pockets with dried slippery elm bark when about to take up the line of march for the battle-field or for a new encampment.  You will find that chewing it freely will greatly allay both thirst and hunger.
    
           The slippery elm grows in abundance in Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee.  I see that our surgeons use it as a substitute for gum arabic.  It is to be hoped our patriotic and philanthropic friends in the country will procure an abundant supply for our army--Savannah News.

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, August 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
    
           No Use for Quinine.--Ed. Mississippian:  I beg to make public through the medium of your paper, the following certain and thoroughly tried cure for ague and fever:  1 pint of cotton seed, 2 parts of water boiled down to one of tea, taken warm one hour before the expected attack.  Many persons will doubtless laugh at this simple remedy, but I have tried it effectually, and unhesitatingly say it is better than quinine, and could I obtain the latter article at a dime a bottle I would infinitely prefer the cotton seed tea.  It will not only cure, invariably, but permanently, and is not at all unpleasant to the taste.
                                                                               
Yours truly, &c.
                                                                               
H. G. D. Brown, Copish co., Miss.

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRANADA, MS], August 28, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
                Watermelon.--Cucurbita Citrullus:  The seeds of watermelon are employed, to a considerable extent, as a remedy in strangury and other affections of the urinary passages, and they are also highly esteemed by many experienced physicians as a valuable diuretic.  They are given in infusion, made with one or two ounces of the bruised seeds to a pint of boiling water and taken when cold ad libitum.
    
           As this is the season when watermelons are abundant, would it not be well for all families to secure a sufficient supply of the seeds for medicinal purposes.  To preserve them, dry them in the sun for two days taking them in at night.

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], September 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 6

Domestic Medicines.

                Some of the medical purveyors of the Confederate States are offering the following prices for the following domestic medicines:
               
Poplar bark, 10c per lb.; wild cherry bark, 30c; dogwood bark, 30c; sassafras bark, 25c; persimmon bark, 25c; willow bark, 20c; slippery elm bark, 30c; red oak bark, 10c; snake root, 50c; blackberry root 30c; queen's delight root, 25c; blood root 30c; bone-set, 10c; pleurisy root, 25c.
    
           Where bark is wanted, the inner bark of the trunk and branches, or the bark of the root, is required.  The outer coarse bark from the trunk should be removed before the inner bark is pealed off. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, September 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
Worth Knowing--In the present scarcity of quinine, it is worth knowing that the berry of the common dogwood will break fevers as successfully as quinine.  We know four plantations where they used it successfully last summer.  One pill is a dose.  The season is now at hand to collect and dry them for use, they will prove invaluable at home and in the hospitals of our soldiers.   

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], September 10, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
                We are informed that a ripe Dog-wood berry taken three times a day, just before eating, will cure ague and fever.  It wouldn't cost much to try.  

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

Wanted Immediately.

            At the Medical Purveyor's Office, a thousand pounds of Black or White Mustard Seed, and all the Castor Oil and Palma Christi Beans that can be brought us, for which the highest price will be paid, on delivery.                       
                                    E. Silverburg,                    
                                    Surg. and Medical Purveyor.
Little Rock, Sept. 24, 1862. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 6             
                                                                                                    [From the Columbus Enquirer.]

Every Soldier his own Physician.

            Editor Enquirer:--Horrified at the rapidity with which our soldiers die in camp, we are tempted to give them the following recipes, the result of some experience, in hopes that some may be saved by using remedies simple, safe, and generally sure cures:       
            To Prevent Sickness.—Have a jug of salted vinegar, seasoned with pepper, and take a mouthful just before going to bed, the salt and vinegar make a near approach to the digestive gastric juice of the stomach, and are antidots [sic] to many of the vegetable and miasmatic poisons.           
            For Pneumonia, Colds, and Caughs [sic].—Take half a cup or less of the salted pepper vinegar, fill the cup nearly full of warm water, and then stir in a raw well beaten egg slowly.  Take a mouthful every 15 or 20 minutes; in the intervals slowly suck on a piece of alum.  If the attack is violent, dip a cloth in hot salted pepper vinegar and apply it round the throat, cover with dry clothes to get up a steam, and do the same to the chest.  
            For Chills.—Put a tablespoonful of salted pepper vinegar in a cup of war water, go to bed and drink; in two hours drink a cup of strong water willow bark tea; in two hours more another tablespoonful of the vinegar and warm water, and so on; alternating, until the fever is broken up.  After sweating, and before going into the out door air, the body ought always to be wiped off with a cloth dipped in cold water.  Dogwood will do if water-willow cannot be obtained.          
            For Measles.—Put a small piece of yeast in a tumbler of warm sweetened water, let it draw, and drink a mouthful every 15 or 30 minutes, and drink plentifully of cold or hot catnip, balsam, hoarhound, or alder tea; and use in place of oil or salts, one tablespoonful molasses, one teaspoonful lard, and one teaspoonful salted pepper vinegar, melted together and taken warm.  Take once a day, if necessary—keep out of the wet and out-door air.       
            For Diarrhoea.—A teaspoonful of salted pepper vinegar every one or two hours.  Take a teaspoonful of the yellow puffs that grow rownd [sic] oak twigs, powdered fine; take twice a day in one tablespoonful of brandy, wine or cordial.  If these yellow puffs cannot be found, suck frequently on a piece of alum.  The quantity of alum depends upon the severity of the attack; take slowly and little at a time.         
            For Camp Fevers.—One tablespoonful of salted pepper vinegar, slightly seasoned, and put into a cup of warm water—drink freely and often, from 4 to 8 cupfuls a day, with fever or without fever.  Pour a cupful more or less of the salted pepper vinegar into cold water; and keep the body, particularly the stomach and head, well bathed with a cloth dipped in it.  Give enemas of cold water, and for oil use a tablespoonful of molasses, a teaspoonful lard, and a teaspoonful pepper vinegar, melted together and taken warm.  If the pepper is to [sic] exciting for delicate patients, leave it out in the drinks and bathings, and use simply the salt and vinegar in water, and very little salt.     
            Antidote for Drunkenness:  For the Benefit of Officers—One cup of strong black Coffee, without milk or sugar, and twenty drops of Laudanum.  Repeat the dose if necessary.  Or take one teaspoonful of Tincture Lobelia in a tumbler of milk; if taken every ten or fifteen minutes it will act as an emetic; taken in longer intervals, say thirty minutes, it will act as an antidote.  The Yankees declared that poisoned liquor was put on the counters in Newbern to poison their soldiers.  Nobody doubts the liquor being poisoned, but it was made of poisons to sell to our own Southern boys; and it is horrifying to think of the liquors now being made down in cellars, of "sulphuric acid, strychnine, puckeye, tobacco leaves, coloring matter and rain water."  For this poisoned liquor, the best antidote is an emetic, say lobelia and warm salt and water, and then drink freely of sugared vinegar water.  
            For Snake Bites—The best thing is one teaspoonful of Lobelia and ten drops of Ammonia, taken every few minutes, and a bottle filled with Lobelia and Ammonia, stopped with the palm of the hand and warmed in a panful of hot water; then apply the bottle to the bite, and it will draw out and antidote the poison.  Either of these, Lobelia or Ammonia, will answer without the other.  Tobacco, Nightshade, or Kurtle Burr, or Deer tongue, (a rough-leafed herb, in flower and appearance like to hog artichoke) stowed in milk; drink the milk, using the rest as a poultice.  The last is an Indian remedy, and will cure in the agonies of death.  
            For the Chicken Cholera, Now Devastating Fowldom.—Put one or two Jimpson or Jamestown week leaves, properly called Stramonium, into the water trough every day—fresh leaves and fresh water.  This is one of the triumphs of Homoepathy, for we were just from a perusal of one of their works, and finding that the chickens died and made no signs of sickness, except holding the head down, we concluded the head must be the seat of the plague, and reading that stramonium affected the head with mania and stupor, we tried it, and have not lost a chicken since the using.         
            If other papers will copy these recipes, they will save many lives, now sacrificed to the negligence of salaried physicians.  The Eastern monarch's plan ought to be adopted, to strike off a certain per cent. of a Doctor's salary every time he looses [sic] a patient—that would soon stop the feast of Death!              
                                                                                                                        X. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

From the Northern Papers.
Charleston in War Times--As Seen by a Yankee Lady.

                The New York Journal of Commerce prints the following as the substance of a conversation with Mrs. Livingston, of New York, who was brought from Savannah under a rebel flag of truce, after a sojourn of several months in Dixie:
               
Mrs. Livingston, whom I find to be a very intelligent lady (and who is the wife of a Captain in the Federal army), says she has been treated with uniform kindness and respect since her detention in the South, which dates back to the commencement of the war.  From personal observation, she believes Savannah may be taken, but Charleston, never. . . . The blockade is ineffectual; she has seen three steamers enter Charleston harbor on one day--and during a short visit at Charleston, one steamer made three trips to Nassau, N. P., bringing medical stores enough to last the entire army a full year. . . .  

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, October 4, 1862, p. 1, c. 6 
            Prepared Flour for Diarrhoea.—Tie up a pint of flour very tightly in cloth and put into boiling water.  When untied, the gluten of the flour will be found in a mass on the outside of the ball.  Remove this and the inside will prove a dry powder, which is very astringent.  Grate this and wet a portion of it in cold milk.  Boil a pint of milk, and when it is at the boiling point stir in as much of the wet mixture as will thicken it to the quality of palatable porridge.  Stir in a little salt, and let this be the sole article of diet until the disease has disappeared.  Relieve it first by toasted bread, or very delicate mutton broth, which latter is also astringent.  If the disease has not progressed to the degree inflammation, this diet will generally preclude the use of medicine. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
            We hear that the scarcity of medicines some time since so much complained of, is now obviated.  We learn on good authority that there is now an unusual large supply of medicines in the State, in the hands of merchants. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, October 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 2 
            Diphtheria.—A lady sends the following remedy for this fearful disease, which is prevailing in some parts of the country.  She says that she has known it to be used in many cases, with the most beneficial result:  
            "Take a handful of alder root, the same quantity of dogwood root, and the same quantity of the bark of persimmon root.  Boil them with a pint of vinegar down to a half pint, then add a very little water, a small lump of alum and a little honey, use as a gargle."  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, October 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

From the Yorkville Enquirer.  
Castor Oil.

            Because the season is near when the Palma Christi (Castor Oil) bean of the present year's crop will be ready for use, it is proper that all persons engaged in its production be informed of the processes by which the said bean may be brought into use as a medicine.  
When the capsule is about to expel the bean it is ripe; the ripe bunches should be removed from the stalk with a knife, and laid thinly over a hard and dry floor of earth, plank, &c., on a hot and sunny day, when the heat of the sun will cause the capsules to expel the contained beans.  Now take away the straw, and winnow away the chaff.          
            The cleanest beans are now to be beaten in a mortar with a pestle, or ground in a mill to a good degree of fineness.—The mass may now be made to give out the contained oil, either by decoction or expression.      
            1.  By decoction.  Put the loose mass in an iron pot, and add a sufficient water; or inclose [sic] it in a coarse bag and suspend it in the water, and boil it until the oil is extracted, then carefully skim it from the surface of the water from time to time.            
            2.  By expression.  Subject the mass of ground beans to hard pressure when inclosed [sic] in cloths, by means of wedges; or, by a screw or lever, when inclosed [sic] in a hollow cylinder made of iron, or wood, lined with sheet iron or tin of sufficient capacity, and receive the oil in suitable vessels.           
            To clarify the oil.  Boil it with a little water added, and remove the coagulated albumen and gummy water from the surface by skimming.  Let the boiling be not carried too far, or it will alter the quality of the oil and render it acrid and unfit for medicine.         
            The beaten beans may be used as a purgative, but an over dose is sure to act powerfully as a cathartic, and often as an emetic.  Three beans (a little more or less) is generally enough for a dose.  Such is the information which I have derived from other persons and from the books upon the matter.             
            E. A. Crenshaw.  

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 14, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Diphtheria.

                We learn that ulcerated sore throat, (thought by some to be diphtheria,) is prevalent in portions of Banks and Franklin counties.  We find the following remedy for diphtheria in our exchanges, which is said to have been used with good result:
    
           Take a handful of alder root, the same quantity of dogwood root, and the same quantity of the bark of persimmon root.  Boil them with a pint of vinegar down to a half pint, then add a very little water, a small lump of alum and a little honey, use as a gargle.

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 14, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
    
           WORTH KNOWING.--In the present scarcity of quinine, it is worth knowing that the berry of the common dogwood will break fever as successfully as quinine.  We know four plantations where they used it successfully, last summer.  One pill is a dose.  The season is now at hand to collect and dry them for use, they will prove invaluable at home and in the hospital of our soldiers.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 1-2
                                                                                               
Richmond, Friday, October 17.
. . . The Medical Purveyor's Office in this city, admirably managed by Dr. Johns, is well worth a visit.  It is an immense establishment, and has done and is still doing an enormous amount of work.  Its supplies are derived mainly from England, and the clerks tell me the English preparations are so superior to those of the Yankees that even the English bottles can be told in the dark by their feel and finish.  The medical stores captured by Jackson in Winchester, when he routed Banks, have helped us out greatly.  Among the good things supplied to Yankee soldiers, are prepared soup and coffee.  A spoonful of the one put into hot water makes a splendid, rich vegetable soup in five minutes; a spoonful of the other, used in the same way--both are in the form of powder--makes an excellent cup of coffee, already sweetened and creamed, complete in all respects, and far better than you get at hotel and boarding house tables.
               
Next door to the Purveyor's, in Pearl street, is the Clothing House of the Quartermaster's Department, another great establishment.  Here, every morning, may be seen a throng of servant girls, little white girls and boys, poor women of the city, and even buggies from the country, all in quest of bundles of soldiers' clothing, which are cut out and sent to all parts of the city and suburbs to be sewed. . . .     Hermes.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 4 
            Physician Curing Diphtheria by the Suction of their Mouths.—It is not long since that one of the most promising of the younger members of the medical profession sacrificed his life to the voluntarily contracted contagion of diphtheria, in an attempt to clear, by the suction of his own lips, the throat of an infant, dying strangled by the exudations of that fearful disease.  Notwithstanding the proved danger of this expedient, however, it has not lacked, and will never lack, imitators, for the sole reason that it is the promptest and often the only means of saving life.  The expedient, notwithstanding the operator well knew its danger, was practiced, and with complete success in rescuing the child, by Dr. Edmond Bessette, a young Surgeon of Augouleme.  What adds to the satisfaction of the account, the child was not only saved by his heroism, but Dr. Bessette suffered no ill effects.  This is attributed to his immediately rinsing his mouth and throat with strong brandy.  The case is reported not by the noble young operator himself, but by his superior in the Augouleme Hospital, Dr. Claude Gigon.—Medical Magazine.  

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, October 25, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Attention All.

            The Medical Purveyor's Department, Little Rock, Ark., is in need of the following herbs, &c., for the use of the army, for which the following prices will be paid on delivery to Dr. E. Silverberg, Medical Purveyor at Little  Rock, or to Dr. C. O. Curtman, at the Chemical Laboratory, Arkadelphia, Ark.  Persons residing in districts where they can be obtained, will please give their attention to collecting and saving them.  The articles must be clean and well dried:
Poppy. ripe capsules                              1 00 per lb.
Lettuce, garden, dried juice,                    1 00   "    "
Marsh rosemary, root,                               30   "    "
Virginia Snakeroot, root,                            75 cts per lb.
Juniper, tops,                                             25   "         "
Red Cedar, tops,                                       25   "         "
Prickly Ash, bark,                                      50   "         "
Robin's Rye or Hair Cap Moss,                 30   "         "
Seneca Snake Root,                                  60   "         "
Puccoon, or Blood Root,                           40   "         "
Wild Cherry Bark,                                     30   "         "
Indian Turnip,                                            10   "         "
American Ipecac, root,                            1 00 per lb.
Blooming Spurge, root,                              50 cts. per lb.
Indian Physic, root.                                    25   "         "
Indian Tobacco,                                         25   "         "
Black Snake Root,                                     50   "         "
Poke Root,                                                20   "         "
Cranesbill,                                                  20   "         "
Blackberry Root,                                        15   "         "
American Gentian,                                      15   "         "
Dogwood Bark,                                          25   "         "
Fever Root,                                                20   "         "
American Hellebore Root,                           20   "         "
Peppermint,                                                 20   "         "
Skunk Cabbage, root,                                  20   "         "
Jamestown Weed, seed and leaves,              20                  "
Hemlock Leaves,                                         20   "         "
Wintergreen or Partridge Berry,                   50   "         "
Horsemint,                                                   20   "         "
Sassafras, bark of root,                                20   "         "
Sassafras pith                                            5 00  "         "
Ginseng root,                                                50   "         "
Sarsaparilla root,                                          75   "         "
Lavender, leaves and stem,                           20   "         "
Flax Seed,                                                 2 50 per bush.
White Oak Bark,                                          10 cts. per lb.
Meadow Sweet,                                           25   "         "
American Columbo root,                              50   "            "
Willow Bark,                                                20   "          "
Tulip Tree Bark or Wild Poplar,                    10   "          "
Persimmon Bark, from Root,                         20   "          "
Centaury Herb,                                             20   "          "
Boneset,                                                       20   "          "
Butterfly Weed or Pleurisy root,                    30   "          "
Dandelion Root,                                            30   "          "
Hops,                                                         1 00  "          "
Wild Senna                                                   50   "          "
May Apple or Mandrake,                              75   "          "
Butternut, inner bark of root,                          50   "          "
Henbane, leaves and seed,                             75   "          "
Barberry leaves,                                             50   "          "
Fleabane,                                                       25   "          "
Scotch Broom, tops of stems,                         30   "          "
Pink Root,                                                      50   "          "
Worm Seed,                                                  25   "          "
Calamus,                                                        25   "          "
Wild Ginger or Canada Snake Root,               25   "          "
Queen's Root,                                                50   "          "
Slippery Elm,                                                  30   "          "
Red Pepper,                                                1 00  "          "
Anise Seed,                                                    50   "          "
Spear Mint,                                                     25   "          "
Bitter Sweet, or Woody Night Shade              50   "          "           
Particular attention called to the following articles:  Senega, Sanguinaria, Asclepias Tuberosa, Terpentaria, Geranium Maculatum, Conium, Hyoscyanns, Gentian, Columbo, Pinckneya Pubens, Eupatorium, Thunnlus, Lavanula, Castor Oil Beans, Mustard Seeds.            
                                                                                        Howard Smith,              
                                                                                        Surgeon and Medical Purveyor,                      
                                                                                        Trans-Mississippi District.
October 25, 1862. 

 [LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

Attention All.

            The Medical Purveyor's Department, Little Rock, Ark., is in need of the following herbs, &c., for the use of the army, for which the following prices will be paid on delivery to Dr. E. Silverberg, Medical Purveyor at Little  Rock, or to Dr. C. O. Curtman, at the Chemical Laboratory, Arkadelphia, Ark.  Persons residing in districts where they can be obtained, will please give their attention to collecting and saving them.  The articles must be clean and well dried:
Poppy. ripe capsules                              1 00 per lb.
Lettuce, garden, dried juice,                    1 00   "    "
Marsh rosemary, root,                               30   "    "
Virginia Snakeroot, root,                            75 cts per lb.
Juniper, tops,                                             25   "         "
Red Cedar, tops,                                       25   "         "
Prickly Ash, bark,                                      50   "         "
Robin's Rye or Hair Cap Moss,                 30   "         "
Seneca Snake Root,                                  60   "         "
Puccoon, or Blood Root,                           40   "         "
Wild Cherry Bark,                                     30   "         "
Indian Turnip,                                            10   "         "
American Ipecac, root,                            1 00 per lb.
Blooming Spurge, root,                              50 cts. per lb.
Indian Physic, root.                                    25   "         "
Indian Tobacco,                                         25   "         "
Black Snake Root,                                     50   "         "
Poke Root,                                                20   "         "
Cranesbill,                                                  20   "         "
Blackberry Root,                                        15   "         "
American Gentian,                                      15   "         "
Dogwood Bark,                                          25   "         "
Fever Root,                                                20   "         "
American Hellebore Root,                           20   "         "
Peppermint,                                                 20   "         "
Skunk Cabbage, root,                                  20   "         "
Jamestown Weed, seed and leaves,              20                  "
Hemlock Leaves,                                         20   "         "
Wintergreen or Partridge Berry,                   50   "         "
Horsemint,                                                   20   "         "
Sassafras, bark of root,                                20   "         "
Sassafras pith                                            5 00  "         "
Ginseng root,                                                50   "         "
Sarsaparilla root,                                          75   "         "
Lavender, leaves and stem,                           20   "         "
Flax Seed,                                                 2 50 per bush.
White Oak Bark,                                          10 cts. per lb.
Meadow Sweet,                                           25   "         "
American Columbo root,                              50   "            "
Willow Bark,                                                20   "          "
Tulip Tree Bark or Wild Poplar,                    10   "          "
Persimmon Bark, from Root,                         20   "          "
Centaury Herb,                                             20   "          "
Boneset,                                                       20   "          "
Butterfly Weed or Pleurisy root,                    30   "          "
Dandelion Root,                                            30   "          "
Hops,                                                         1 00  "          "
Wild Senna                                                   50   "          "
May Apple or Mandrake,                              75   "          "
Butternut, inner bark of root,                          50   "          "
Henbane, leaves and seed,                             75   "          "
Barberry leaves,                                             50   "          "
Fleabane,                                                       25   "          "
Scotch Broom, tops of stems,                         30   "          "
Pink Root,                                                      50   "          "
Worm Seed,                                                  25   "          "
Calamus,                                                        25   "          "
Wild Ginger or Canada Snake Root,               25   "          "
Queen's Root,                                                50   "          "
Slippery Elm,                                                  30   "          "
Red Pepper,                                                1 00  "          "
Anise Seed,                                                    50   "          "
Spear Mint,                                                     25   "          "
Bitter Sweet, or Woody Night Shade              50   "          "           
Particular attention called to the following articles:  Senega, Sanguinaria, Asclepias Tuberosa, Terpentaria, Geranium Maculatum, Conium, Hyoscyanns, Gentian, Columbo, Pinckneya Pubens, Eupatorium, Thunnlus, Lavanula, Castor Oil Beans, Mustard Seeds.            
                                                                                        Howard Smith,              
                                                                                        Surgeon and Medical Purveyor,                      
                                                                                        Trans-Mississippi District.
October 25, 1862. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
A Certain Cure for Colds.--A remedy never known to fail.  Three cents worth of licorice, two cents worth of rock candy, three cents worth of gum arabic.  Put them in a quart of water, simmer them till thoroughly dissolved; then add three cents worth of paregoric and a like quantity of antimonial wine.  Let it cool, and sip whenever the cough is troublesome.  It is pleasant, infallible, cheap and good.  Its cost is only fifteen cents.
               
We notice the above in our exchanges and suppose it is either a Homeopathic prescription, or that it has not been revised since the advance in the price of drugs. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Remedy in Diphtheria.

                Take a handful of alder root, the same quantity of dogwood root, and the same quantity of persimmon root.  Boil them with a pint of vinegar down to a half pint, then add a very little water, a small lump of alum and a little honey, and use as a gargle.
               
We find the above prescription extensively published as a remedy that is said to have done good in diphtheria.  It is a harmless gargle and a good remedy in cases of common or epidemic "sore throat," which constitute the "diphtheria" of most physicians who are famous for curing the malady, as well as of the unprofessional.
               
Below we give another prescription which has long been before the people, and is entitled to confidence, and trial, in the absence of a skillful physician.
               
Diphtheria and Its Cures.--The distinguishing mark of this malady from other diseases of the throat, is the formation of a membrane which increases gradually until the patient is strangled to death.  It is sometimes accompanied with ulceration and great bodily prostration.  To prevent the formation of membrane is to arrest and cure the disease.  The Cincinnati Press gives the following simple remedy:  In the early stages of the complaint, which is always accompanied by a soreness and swelling of the throat, let the patient use a simple solution of salt and water, as a gargle, every fifteen minutes.  At the same time moisten a piece of flannel with a solution of the same kind, made as warm as the patient can bear it, and bind it around his throat, renewing it as often as the gargle is administered, and in the meanwhile, sprinkle fine salt between the flannel and the neck.  Use inwardly some tonic or stimulant, either separately, or if the prostration be great, use both together.  The treatment as may be seen, is extremely simple, and if used in the earlier stages of the disease, will effect a complete cure. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
                                                                                                               
Houston, Nov. 14, 1862.
In Store, and to be received by the 20th inst., the following:
3880 lb Saleratus, in 1/2 & 1 lb. papers,
50 lb Chlorate of Potass,
400 do Gum of Camphor,
100 do Chloroform,
56 oz. Morphone, (Rosengarten's,)
500 do Quinine,
160 lb Carbonate of Ammonia,
56 do Iodide of Potass,
2000 gals. Turpentine,
210 bbls Rosin, No. 1,
56 lb. Sub Nitrate Bismirch,
50,000 Bottle Corks, Taper; 10 bxs Powatan Pipes,
10 bxs Olive Oil, (crop 1861)
                                                                               
George & Davidson.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, November 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 3 
            Persimmons gathered and made into a syrup or cordial, are a specific remedy for dysentery.  If the persimmons are not quite ripe so much the better.  Gather, wash, put in boiling water, strain through a coarse cloth and add sugar. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, December 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 6 
            We find in the Selma Reporter the following recipe, which is said to be a sure cure for small pox:    
            Take one grain each of powdered Foxglove (Digitalis) and sulphate of zinc.  Rub them together thoroughly in a mortar with 5 or 6 drops of water; this done, add 4 or 5 ounces of water, and sweeten with sugar.  Dose—a tablespoonful for an adult, and one or two teaspoonfuls for a child every two or three hours until the symptoms of the disease vanish.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, December 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 1 
            Coal oil or Kerosene oil is said to be an excellent remedy for diphtheria.  The throat should be rubbed with the oil freely and frequently. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
                Fresh Medicines, &c., &c.  Just received a small additional assortment of calomel, glycerine, mercurial ointment, quinine, chlorate potas, Nitrate Silver, syrup iodide iron, Mur. Tr. Iron.  Also, assorted trusses, single and double, tooth forcepts, &c., iodine potas, paregoric, laundanum, Mrs. Winslow's syrup, cherry pectoral, syrup sarsaparilla, cod liver jelly, on hand.  Personal attention given to Prescriptions at the Cotton Square Drug Store.  Dec. 11. 

WASHINGTON [AR] TELEGRAPH, December 31, 1862

BEESWAX WANTED.

The medical purveyor at Little Rock wishes to purchase Beeswax for the purpose of making cerates and ointments for wounded soldiers.  The highest cash price will be paid for all delivered to the  undersigned.
                                                                                    W. H. ETTER.
Washington, Dec. 24, 1862.

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cure of Diphtheria.--The Richmond Whig says:
               
"A gentleman who tried it says that Kerosine, or coal oil, is an almost infallible remedy for the terrible and fatal disease.--Diphtheria.  The remedy is to be applied externally, by rubbing the throat with the oil freely and frequently.  It has cured numerous cases, as many probably, as fifty, in one neighborhood where our informant lives, and he knows of but one case in which it failed.  He regards it as the best remedy known for this disease.  The remedy is a simple one and easily tried."  

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 4             
            Cure for diptheria:  Rub the throat with Kreosene [sic] or coal oil.  Keep it wet, and if the cloth is warm, so much the better.

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 3 
            We find the following in an exchange, and would like to try it when we have the toothache.  We have a piece of zinc, and if any of our friends have a quarter about their clothes, we would like to borrow it, just to try the experiment:      
            Cure for Tooth Ache.—Take a piece of sheet zinc about the size of a fourpence halfpenny, and a piece of silver—say a quarter of a dollar, place them together and hold them between and contiguous to the defective tooth, in a few minutes the pain will be gone as if by magic.  The zinc and silver acting as a galvanic batter, will produce on the nerves of the tooth sufficient electricity to establish a current and consequently relieves the pain. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], February 26, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
                Camp Itch--A Remedy Therefor.--A gentleman who has had much experience in the treatment of that loathsome disease, the itch, furnishes the following recipe for its cure:
               
For the benefit of our soldiers suffering with camp itch, if you think proper you may publish the following:  Take iodide of potassium 60 grains, lard 2 ounces, mix well, and after washing the body well with warm soap suds, rub the ointment over the person three times a week.  In seven or eight days the Acarus, or itch insect, will be destroyed.--In this recipe the horrible effects of the old sulphur ointment are obviated.  

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, March 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
            Valuable Recipe.—A lady friend has sent us for publication the following recipe for making an invaluable liniment.  She says it is a certain remedy for swollen breasts, (in all cases,) and if used in time will prevent breasts from rising.  It is good for swellings, bruises and sores of any kind—will cure in a short time—but for swollen breasts especially.  The liniment is recommended by several ladies of our acquaintance:
            Take one ounce gum camphor; eight ounces gum myrrh; two ounces cayenne pepper; two pints brandy, whisky or alcohol.  After pulverising the solid articles, put all, with the brandy or alcohol, in a stone jug; set the jug in a kettle of boiling water, and let it remain therein, unstopped, about thirty minutes; then add three tablespoonsful of turpentine, and a small teacupful of sweet oil.  It will then be ready for use.
            Bathe the parts affected from ten to twenty minutes, according to the severity of the case, before a fire; then wet a flannel with it and apply it to the affected part.—Repeat the application every twelve or twenty hours until well. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, March 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
Manufacture of Medicines.—We were equally gratified and surprised on a recent visit to Montgomery by an inspection of the chemical laboratory attached to the Confederate States Medical Purveyor's office in that city.  Our esteemed townsman, Dr. W. H. Anderson, is the head of that establishment.  Besides attending to the extensive business of this office as Medical Purveyor, and purchasing and distributing immense stocks of medicines and supplies of all sorts for the military hospitals, he has improvised at small expense a chemical laboratory, where he is making medicines which either cannot be bought at all, or which are very scarce and high priced.  During the last summer and fall he advertised for medicinal barks and plants, the growth of our Southern forests, and these were brought into him in large quantities, from far and near, thus giving profitable employment to many men, women and children in the country.
               
These are now being manufactured into extracts, tinctures and other articles indispensable for hospital use.  Many other medicines are being manufactured besides those made from domestic plants, and all with a very great saving to the government.  Tannin, a very scarce article and worth in the market $8 per ounce, is produced at this depot at the cost of $12 per pound.  Chloroform, an article of prime necessity in surgery, is made for $4 per pound, the market price being $20.  Sweet spirits of nitre, an article much used in the army, and exceedingly scarce, and bringing in the market $6 per pound, is made here at leas than ninety cents per pound.
               
The laboratory, as we have remarked, has been "improvised" and got up with simple apparatus and great economy.  The whole has not cost the Government more than one thousand dollars, and the supplies it turns out afford a saving to the Government of not less than three hundred dollars a day.
               
Such examples of official industry and tact are worthy of public mention and high praise.  If every administrative army officer had labored as faithfully to save the Government money, it would make a difference of millions upon millions in the footing up of the Confederate National debt.—Advertiser & Register.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, March 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

Wanted.

                Some of our hospitals are much in want of red pepper, sage, cotton strips for bandages, and other articles useful to the sick or wounded.  Let those who have any of these articles send them to the Republican Office without delay for distribution among the needy. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 17, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
                Just received, cotton cards, quinine, toilet soap, spool cotton, shoe-thread, and matches.  J. M. Benbrook, at Hewit & Coulson's old stand.  mar17
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
The following receipt we are assured from an entirely reliable source, makes a most useful and excellent Ointment for sores, ulcers &c.  It has been furnished by a patriotic lady of Galveston, Mrs. Arnold, who is anxious that it may be found useful to our soldiers.  We recommend its trial.  1 Ounce Venice Turpentine; 1 ounce Precipatate [sic]; 1 ounce Castor Oil; 1 ½ ounce Mutton Tallow; 1 ounce lard; 1 spoonful Spirits of Turpentine to be sell stirred in a warm earthen dish.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Typhoid Fever in the Army.—Every day we hear sad tidings of death among the gallant boys in the army from that scourge, typhoid fever.  A gentleman of the medical profession new in this city, a citizen of Texas, expresses his surprise that the potent remedy of spirits of turpentine has made so little progress in the country for the cure of this ailment.  My friend, Dr. R., a man of splendid professional ability, says that if any remedy can ever be called a specific, spirits of turpentine may be so considered in case of typhoid fever.
               
He begins with small doses of about ten drops every two hours, and continues the remedy in large doses, giving as high as a teaspoonful at a dose, till the right action is seen on the skin.
               
Spirits of nitre may be needed to relieve strangury apt to follow the administration of turpentine, but nothing further is ever needed.—Atlanta Confederacy.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Quinine.  On consignment, two hundred ounces Power & Wieghtman's Quinine, for sale by P. H. McGraw.  mar20.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Our contemporary of the Marshall Republican reminds his readers of the importance of raising a good supply of mustard.  It is very easily raised in this climate, and is valuable, not only as a condiment, but for various medical purposes.  Let us remember that we must now raise or make nearly everything we want, or else do without.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
                Blackberry and Wine Cordial.  We avail ourselves of the kindness of a friend to publish the following excellent receipt for making cordial.  It is recommended as a delightful beverage, and as infallible specific for diarrhoea or ordinary disease of the bowels:
    
           Receipt.  To half a bushel of blackberries, well mashed, add a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves; pulverize well, mix, and boil slowly until properly done; then strain or squeeze the juice through homespun or flannel, and add to each pint of the juice one pound of the loaf-sugar; boil again for some time, take it off, and while cooling, add half a gallon of best Cognac brandy.
    
           Blackberry Wine.--The following is said to be an excellent receipt for the manufacture of superior wine from Blackberries:
    
           Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for  use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence, before.
   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
                Blackberry and Wine Cordial.  We avail ourselves of the kindness of a friend to publish the following excellent receipt for making cordial.  It is recommended as a delightful beverage, and as infallible specific for diarrhoea or ordinary disease of the bowels:
    
           Receipt.  To half a bushel of blackberries, well mashed, add a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves; pulverize well, mix, and boil slowly until properly done; then strain or squeeze the juice through homespun or flannel, and add to each pint of the juice one pound of the loaf-sugar; boil again for some time, take it off, and while cooling, add half a gallon of best Cognac brandy.    

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 4, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

To The Ladies!

                                                                                                Confederate States of America,      }
                                                                                               
Surgeon General's Office,               }
                                                                                               
Richmond, Va., March 19th, 1863.}
Circular.]
               
Medical Purveyors will make endeavors through cards published in newspapers, to induce the ladies throughout the South to interest themselves in the culture of the Garden Poppy.  They may thus render the Confederacy essential service.
               
[Signed]                                                 S. P. Moore,
                                                                                               
Surgeon General, C.S.A.

------

                                                                                                Medical Purveyor's Office,               }
                                                               
                                Jackson, Mississippi, April 2d, 1863}
               
In compliance with the above order from the Surgeon General, I would respectfully call the attention of the ladies of Mississippi and Louisiana to the importance of the cultivation of this plant, the juice of which exuding from the punctured capsules, when sufficiently hardened and carefully put up, may be sent to this depot.
                                                                                               
Richard Potts,
                                                               
Surgeon C.S.A. and Medical Purveyor,
ap4 1m                                                                    Department Miss and East Louisiana.   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, April 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
                How to cure chills.  Strong hoarhound tea well boiled and drank freely, will cure the most obstinate case of chills on record.  It is easily obtained, and the remedy should be known to every poor soldier throughout the Confederacy.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 8, 1863, p. 1. c. 6  
            Ladies throughout South, are requested to interest themselves in the culture of the Garden Poppy, and thus render the Confederacy essential service.  The juice extracted from the punctured capsules, when sufficiently hardened, should be carefully put up and forwarded to the nearest Medical Purveyor's Department. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 15, 1863, p. 3, c. 3          
            Strong hoarhound tea, well boiled and drank freely, will cure the most obstinate cases of chills on record.  It is easily obtained, and the remedy should be known to every poor soldier throughout the Confederacy.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 20, 1863, p. 4, c. 5

Cultivation of the Garden Poppy.

                To the Editor of the Mercury:  As the prospect of cultivating the Garden Poppy on an extensive scale is very encouraging, and having received a number of letters asking information relative to the planting, management and preparation of Opium, I send you the following directions, which I have extracted from a work, recently published, entitled "Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests," by Surgeon F. Peyre Porcher, C. S. Army.
                                                                                                               
Thomas Lining,
                                                                                               
Medical Purveyor, C. S. A.
               
Garden Poppy.--The variety most preferred is that whose heads or capsules, when ripe, assume a slightly bluish tinge.  The color of the flower is unimportant.  The seed is either white or black; some persons think that the black seeded variety is more productive, others give the preference to the white in this respect.  The structure of the capsules is of more consequence; for there is a variety in which the envelope of the capsule dehises [sic?] spontaneously when ripe, so that the seed is easily shed; and another, in which the seed remains enclosed within the capsules, which must be opened in order to extract it.  The Poppy may become one of the most profitable corps, if we have the means of disposing of the seed, or if we knew how to extract the oil.  By proper cultivation it might be made to produce from nine to ten bushels of seed per acre, and one bushel yields twenty-four pounds of good oil.--This oil, especially the first portion, which is cold expressed, and mixed in the mill with slices of apple, is doubtless the purest kind of oil for the table, and the most agreeable that is known.  It is inferior to none excepting the finest Nice or Lucca oil.  It is preferable to the second rate oil of those places, and the peculiar taste of the olive oil may be imparted to it by the addition of a small quantity of that oil of superior quality.--The oil of the Poppy is bland, and not narcotic.  It is used both for food and light, and is considered a fifth more valuable than that of the Coliza.  The cakes remaining after the expression of the oil are valuable for the fattening of swine, and the stalks for fuel.  The ashes which remains after burning it are of the best kind for manure.  The oil expressed in cold weather is much superior to that obtained in warm weather, and the two must not be mixed.  The largest seeds, which are employed for medical and domestic use, are obtained from the single-flowered kind, not only for the purpose of extracting Opium, but also on account of the bland esculent oil which is expressed from the seeds, which are simply emulsive, and contain none of the narcotic principle.  For the latter purpose, if no other, its culture in this country is worthy of attention.  The annual amount of Opium imported into the United States is valued at upwards of $407,000.  The Poppy, it is said, produces better when planted in the fall.  The seeds should be planted in the month of September, by which means the plants attain sufficient size to endure the cold of winter; they were also found to produce more opium than those planted in March.  Having a tap-root, their size will consequently be proportioned to the depth of earth they are enabled to penetrate--hence the necessity of land that will admit of deep ploughing.  The finest of the surface, too, is very essential.  As the seed is small, and the plants on their first coming up so exceedingly tender, that the brush harrow should always be used after those which are commonly employed.  They should be so cultivated that the gatherer may not disturb the plants in collecting the juice.  The successful cultivation of the plant, however, requires the provision of a good soil, appropriate manure and careful management.  In obtaining Gum Opium, the capsules are cut longitudinally only through the skin, though some advise that it should be done from below upwards.  The incisions should be made in the afternoon, the hardened gum being scraped off the next morning.  If the incisions be too deep, the juice passes within the poppy head.  I n England, forty pounds were made in one season by one person. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 7
J. N. Cannon & Co. have just received--
500 ounces Quinine,
100 ounces Morphine,
200 pounds Calomel,
200 pounds Blue mass,
100 pounds Green tea,
500 pounds Lamp Black,
200 lbs best Glue
12 dozen Medicinal Brandy,
500 assorted Violin Strings.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, April 23, 1863, p. 2, c. 5      
            A gentleman who has administered the following remedy for diphtheria, says it has always proved effectual in affording speedy relief:  Take a common tobacco pipe, place a live coal within the bowl, drop a little tar upon the coal, and let the patient draw smoke into the mouth and discharge it through the nostrils.  The remedy is safe and simple, and should be tried whenever occasion may require.  Many valuable lives may be saved, the informant confidently believes, by prompt treatment as above. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 29, 1863, p. 1, c. 1-2

Resources of Our Fields and Forests.

                In compliance with the suggestion of the Surgeon General, we begin to-day the publication of extracts from the valuable work of Dr. Porcher.  We call the special attention of farmers and planters, of house-wives, gardeners, and all who deal with herbs, to these extracts, in the hope that they will devote themselves with energy to the patriotic task of collecting and preparing medicinal plants for the use of the soldiers in the field and in hospitals.  A vast deal of good may be done, and an immense stock of native medicines may be gathered before next winter sets in, if the hints here given are attended to.  Of course, a fair price will be paid for all medicines, and a ready sale will be found for them:
               
Sassafras.--Whilst engaged in active duties as Surgeon to the Holcombe Legion, whenever a soldier suffered from measles, pneumonia, bronchitis, or cold, his companion or nurse was directed to procure the roots and leaves of sassafras, and a tea made with this supplied that of flax seed or gum arabic.
               
Bene (Sesamum).--The planters and farmers throughout the Confederate States should save and cure all the leaves of the Bene now growing, to be used in camp dysentery, in colds, coughs, etc., among our soldiers, in place of gum arabic or flax seed.  One or two leaves in a tumbler of water imparts their mucilagenous properties.
               
Dogwood (Cornus Florida)--Since the war, the bark has been employed with great advantage in place of quinine--by physicians in Sumter District, S. C., and elsewhere--particularly in cases of low forms of fever, and in dysentery, on the river courses, of a typhoid character.  It is given as a substitute for Peruvian bark.  In fact, in almost any case where the Cinchona bark was used.
               
Wild Jalap (Podophyllum Peltatum).--This can be used as a laxative in place of rhubarb or jalap, or whenever a purgative is required.  Every planter in the Confederate States can produce the opium, mustard and flax seed that is required, either for the army or home use.
               
Podophyllum peltatum, L.  Wild jalap; May Apple.--We have employed this plant among negros as a substitute for jalap and the ordinary cathartics, and find that it answers every purpose, being easily prepared by the person having charge of them.  Thirty grains of the root in substance were given, or an infusion of one ounce in a pint of water, of which a wine glassful three times a day is the dose; employing the Liriodendron tulipiferaas a substitute for quinine during the stage of intermission of all mild cases of intermittent fever.  We would invite the particular attention of planters to the extensive use of these medicines upon their plantations.  We have caused them to be used on one on which upward of a hundred negros resided, and we found that during a period of seven months, including the warm months of summer, they were used in all cases, and apparently fulfilled every indication.
               
Papaver Sumniferum.  Opium Poppy.--"The poppy may become one of the most profitable corps if we have the means of disposing of the seed, or if we knew how to extract the oil.  By proper cultivation it may be made to produce from nine to ten bushels of seed per acres, and one bushel yields twenty-four pounds of good oil.  This oil, especially the first portion, which is cold pressed, and mixed in the mill with slices of apple, is doubtless the purest kind of oil for the table, and the most agreeable that is known.  It is inferior to none, excepting the finest Nice or Lucca oil.  It is preferable to the second rate oil of those places, and the peculiar taste of olive oil may be imparted to it by the addition of a small quantity of that oil of superfine quality."  The largest heads which are employed for medical or domestic use, are obtained from the single flowered kind, not only for the purpose of extracting opium, but also on account of the bland, escurent [sic] oil that is expressed from the seeds, which are simply emulsive, and contain none of the narcotic principle.  For the latter purpose, if no other, its culture in this country is worthy of attention.  Certainly, it is an object worthy of public encouragement, as the annual amount of opium imported into the United States is valued at upward of $407,000.  If this was true some years since, how much more essential to us is its production now (1862), when gum opium and morphine are so very difficult to obtain?  Occupied in researches upon these subjects during the month of June, under the order of the Surgeon-General, I was enabled to collect, in a few days, more than an ounce of gum opium, apparently of very excellent quality, having all the smell and taste of opium (which I have administered to the sick), from specimens of the red poppy found growing in a garden near Stateburgh, S. C.  I have little doubt that all we require could be gathered by ladies and children within the Confederate States, if only the slightest attention was paid to cultivating the plants in our gardens.  It thrives well and bears abundantly.  It is not generally known that the gum which hardens after incising the capsules is then ready for use, and may be prescribed as gum opium, or laudanum and paregoric may be made from it, with alcohol or whisky. The poppy, it is said, produces better when planted in the fall.
               
In obtaining gum opium, the capsules are cut longitudinally only through the skin, though some advise that it should be done from below upwards.  I find longitudinal incisions the most economical.  This is generally done late in the afternoon, the hardened gum being scraped off early next morning.  Boys and girls can easily attend to this.  If the capsules are cut only on one side, the same operation may be repeated on the other side, and a fresh supply of opium obtained.  A knife with three or four edges, cutting about the twelfth or fourteenth part of an inch, is some times used.  If the incision is too deep, the juice passes within the poppy head.
               
Liriodendron tulipifera, L.  Tulip tree; white wood; poplar.  Grows in swamps; diffused.  Collected in St. John's, Charleston District; Columbia; Newbern.  Fl. June.
               
This plant is tonic diuretic, and diaphoretic, and is generally considered one of the most valuable of the substitutes for Peruvian bark.  Dose of bark xx to xxx grains.  It is a stimulant tonic, slightly diaphoretic.  The infusion or decoction is made in the proportion of an ounce to a pint of water; dose, one or two fluid ounces.
               
Aconitum uncinatum, L. Aconite, monkshood, wolfbane.  Shady banks of streams among the mountains of  Confederate States, and northward.
               
The tincture of aconite is more manageable, and is useful as an external anesthetic in frontal neuralgia, local pains, etc.  No remedy, save chloroform, equals it when applied locally for the relief of pain.  The tincture may be combined with oil and chloroform, as a liniment in rheumatism.
               
Cornus Florida, L.  Dogwood.  Well known; diffused in rich shady lands; Newbern, Va.
               
In our present need of astringent and anti-periodics and tonics, the dogwood bark powdered will be found the best substitute for Peruvian.  Internally and externally, it can be applied wherever the cinchona barks were found serviceable.  The dogwood bark and root, in decoction, or in form of cold infusion, is believed by many to be the most efficient substitute for quinine, also in treating malarial fevers; certainly it might be used in the cases occurring in camp, to prevent the waste of quinine, as it can be easily and abundantly procured.
               
Dr. Richard Moore, of Sumter District, informs me that he not only finds it efficient in fevers, but particularly useful, with whisky or alcohol, in low forms of fevers, and dysentery occurring near our river swamps.
               
During convalescence, where an astringent tonic is required, this plant supplies our need.  See eupatorium (boneset) and Liriodendfon.  These, with the blackberry and chinquapin as astringents, the gentians and pipsissewa as tonics and tonic diuretics, the sweet gum, sassafras and bene for their mucilaginous and aromatic properties, and the wild jalap (podophylum) as a cathartic, supply the surgeon in camp with easily procurable medicinal plants, which are sufficient for almost every purpose.  Nitrate and bi. carbonate of potash are most required, and with calomel, may be procured from abroad.  Our supply of opium can be easily procured by planting the poppy. and incising the capsules.  Every planter could raise a full supply of opium, mustard and flax seed.  The wood of the dogwood, like the willow, is preferred in making gun powder.  See Salin.  A tonic compound, as advised by the herbalists, is made with the bark of the root of dogwood, colombo (Frasera), poplar, each six ounces; bark of wild cherry, six ounces; leaves of thoroughwort, four ounces; cayenne pepper, four ounces--sifted and mixed.  Dose, a teaspoonful, in warm or cold water, repeated.  It is stated in the Newbern Progress "that a ripe dogwood berry taken three times a day, before meals, will cure ague and fever."    
                Cucumis pepo, W. Pumpkin.  Cultivated very successfully in South Carolina.
               
The fruit which should have been dried as a winter provision for our army, ahs been converted into brandy, and dried fruit will probably be very scarce.  An excellent substitute may be found in the pumpkin.  Cut into slips and dried either in the sun or in a dry room, it is said to be little inferior to dried apples.
               
Ricadus communis.  Castor oil plant.
               
Mode of Culture.--Break up the land with a plough, and lay it off in rows six feet apart, each way.  The best time to plant is from the middle of April to the second week in May.  Drop three seeds in each hill.  Half a bushel of seed will plant ten acres.  Treat the plant in the same manner as corn.  Be careful in looking after the cut-worm, which gives it the preference to corn.  When the plants are six inches high, they should be thinned to one stalk in a hill.  New lands, broken up the same season, are not suited.  One hand can tend five acres.  In a good, dry soil, the yield will be from fifteen to twenty bushels per acres, each bushel yielding seven quarts of pure oil.
               
Gathering the Seed.--About the middle of August the seeds begin to ripen, and will continue until checked by the frost.  A writer in the Western Plough Boy, of 1832, says: "Previous to the ripening of the seeds, the yard for spreading on should be prepared.  It should be made on ground of a gradual descent, open to the sun, and made very smooth and firm.  The first and second parcels that ripen must stand till the pods on the ear begin to crack, otherwise a part of the bean will be imperfect.  Later in the season, when the stalk is more mature, they must be cut, when two or three pods begin to open, or they will waste.  They are laid in the yard one layer deep.  In warm weather a layer will pop out in three days.  When all have opened, the stems are raked off.  The hulls are swept off with a broom made with naked switches; which, if carefully done, will not leave more than one bushel of hulls in eight of beans.  They may be cleaned with a common wheat fan, with a riddle suited to the size of a bean."
               
Mode of Extraction--The oil is obtained both by coction and expression.  The former method is performed by tying up the seeds, previously broken and bruised, in a bag, which is suspended in boiling water till the oil is extracted and rises to the surface, when it is skimmed off.  This is the usual mode adopted by farmers.  The smallest quantity of water, however, remaining in the oil, causes it to become rancid.
               
I trust our planters will see the necessity of preparing to plant the castor oil bean extensively.  The great value of the oil as a purgative is in the mildness and rapidity with which it operates.  It is much needed by the brave defenders of our soil.  It has saved thousands of lives; and if we cannot obtain it, thousands must perish by our inattention to the production of this necessary medicine.   That the profits, under moderate prices, are greater than the production of any other article, I am fully aware.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 5, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
Poppy.—We have a considerable quantity of the seed of this valuable medicinal herb in hand, which will be cheerfully distributed among those who are inclined to embark in the production of opiate, a drug much needed in the Confederacy.

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 22, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Save the Rose Leaves.—Rose leaves, says the Southern Cultivator, are extensively used in the manufacture of blue pills, and are in great demand for preparing this valuable medicine.  The gardens of city and country now abound in roses, and we are sure that the ladies will see to it that the leaves are made to subserve this purpose of utility.  Surgeon J. J. Chisholm, of the Medical Purveying Department, in Columbia, S. C., invokes the aid of the ladies in collecting a supply, and we trust our lady readers everywhere will heartily respond to the call.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 27, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
How to Cure Chills.—Strong hoarhound tea, well boiled and drank freely, will cure the most obstinate case of chills on record.  It is easily obtained, and the remedy should be known to every poor soldier throughout the Confederacy.
               
The number of paper mills now in the Confederacy is one in Alabama, three in Georgia, five in South Carolina, eight in North Carolina, two in Virginia, and one in Tennessee, making twenty in all.—These, it is said, would be able to supply all the paper wanted in the Confederacy, but for the great scarcity of the material.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

40 Ounces
 
P. and W. Quinine,
Received and for sale by

                                                                                                                G. M. Heidt,
                                                                                               
Corner State and Whitaker sts.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, July 2, 1863, p. 2, c. 7-8 [note:  Latin names hard to read and may be mistranscribed; some numbers may also be mistranscribed]
                                                                                                      
Confederate States of America.
                                                                                            
Medical Purveyor's Office, 4th District.
                                                                                                           
Macon, Ga., July 1st, 1863.

List of Indigenous Plants Wanted at This Department. 

Botanical Name                  Common Name.                  Part Used                             Price

Asarum Canadense             Wild Ginger.                        Dried Root                   30 cents per pound.
Capsicum                            Red Pepper                         Dried Pods                   25            "
Cicutum Maculatum            Hemlock                              {Dried Leaves              15            "
                                                                                     
{Seed                           30            "
Cornus Floridae                  Dogwood                            {Inner bark, freed from
                                                                                     
{wood and coarse outer bark
                                                                                     
{and well dry                 10            "
Colombo                                                                        Dried root                     30            "
Calamus                                                                                 "                            20            "
Eupatorium Perfoliatum       Boneset                                Leaves and Flowers        5              "
Euphorbia Ipecacuanhic      Ipecacuantae Spurge            Dried Root                    50            "
Gentiana Catesbaei             American Gentian                         "                            25            "
Gelsaminum                        Yellow Jasmine                     Root                             10            "
Hyosiamus Niger                 Henbane                              {Leaves                        25            "
                                                                                     
{Seed                           30            "
Humulus Lupulus                 Hops                                   Dried Flowers               1 dollar   "
Juglans Cincrea                   Butternut                              Dried Bark and Root    10 cents "
Liriodendron                       Tulip or Poplar Tree             {Dried Inner bark freed  3              "
                                                                                     
{from wood and coarse
                                                                                     
{bark                            Lavendulum                         Lavender                               " Flowers                    50            "
Pinckneya Pubens               Georgia Bark                         Inner Bark dried          20            "
Prunus Virginianus               Wild Cherry                          Dried Bark                    5              "
Podophyllum Peltatum         May Apple                            Dried Root                 30            "
Panax Quinquefolium          Ginseng                                        "                           80            "
Rubus Villosus                    Blackberry                                   "                             5              "
Senega                               Seneka Snakeroot                        "                           75            "
Sanguinaria Canadensis      Puccoon Root                               "                           30            "
Spirea Tomentosa              Hardhack                               Plant                             5              "
Statice Caroliniana             Marsh Rosemary                    Leaves                        20            "
Sinapis                               Mustard                                 Seed                           30            "
Serpentaria                        Snakeroot                              Dried Root                  75            "
Sarsaparilla                                                                            "                           30            "
Triosteum Perfoliatum         Fever Root                                                               20            "
Ulmae                                Slippery Elm                          {Dried bark freed from
                                                                                      
{outer coarse bark         5              "
Sesamum                           Bene                                       Seed                           20            "
Dried Apples                                                                                                     $2.00 per bushel
"              Peaches                                                                                                3.50        "
"              Pumpkin                                                                                               1.00        "
"              Okra                                                                                                    5.00        "
Rhus Glabrum                     Sumach                                 Leaves, Bark and Root 10 cents per pound
                                         
Marsh Mallow                       Root,                              50            "
                                         
Potato Fly                                                                $2.00       "
Ricinus Communis              Castor Oil                              Beans, hulled              $7.00 per bushel
"                                                                                              "   not hulled        $3.00       "
[illegible] named Articles, if carefully gathered and dried in the shade, will be purchased at the Medical Purveyor's Office in Macon, Ga.
               
By order of the Surgeon General      
                                                                                                               
W. H. Prioleau,
                                                                             
Assistant Surgeon and Medical Purveyor, C.S.A.
 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], June 17, 1863, p. 4, c. 2
                Save the Rose Leaves.--Rose leaves are extensively used in the manufacture of blue pills, and are in great demand for preparing this valuable medicine.  The gardens of city and country now abound in roses, and we are sure that the ladies will see to it that the leaves are made to subserve this purpose of utility.  Surgeon J. J. Chisholm, of the Medical Purveying Department, in Columbia, S. C., invokes the aid of the ladies in collecting a supply and we trust our lady readers everywhere will heartily respond to the call.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 30, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
    
           Cut this out.--At the present season of the year, when dysentery and diarrhea are prevalent, it is well to have a preventative at hand.  Clip the one below and have it convenient.  Many years' trial has proved it a sure remedy:
   
            Take equal parts tincture of opium, cayenne pepper, rhubarb, essence of peppermint, and spirits of camphor.  Mix well in a bottle and shake before using.  Dose, from four to thirty drops, to be repeated every ten or fifteen minutes, until relief is obtained.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 7, 1863, p. 1, c. 5

Confederate States of America

                                                                                             Medical Purveyor's Office,                 }
                                                                                            
Columbia, S. C., June 24, 1863.        }
The following indigenous plants are wanted at this office:
Wild Ginger                            Dried Root                             30 cents per lb.
Red Pepper                            Dried Pods                             25 cents per lb.
Hemlock                             { Dried Leaves                          15 cents per lb.
                                           
{ Seed.                                     30 cents per lb.
Dogwood                             {  Inner bark freed from
                                           
{  wood and coarse outer
                                           
{ well dried                               10 cents per lb.
Columbo                                Dried Root                             30 cents per lb.
Calamus                                 Dried Root                             20 cents per lb.
Boneset                                 Leaves and Flowers                  5 cents per lb.
Ipecac or Hippo                    Dried Root                              50 cents per lb.
Gentian                                  Dried Root                              25 cents per lb.
Indian Physic                         Dried Root                              30 cents per lb.
Yellow Jessamine Root                                                         10 cents per lb.
Henbane                             { Leaves                                     25 cents per lb.
                                          
{ Seed                                       30 cents per lb.
Hops                                      Dried Flowers                        1 dollar per lb.
Butternut                                Dried Bark and  Roots            10 cents per lb.
Tulip or Poplar                    { Dried Inner Bark
               
Tree                    { freed from wood and
                                          
{ coarse bark                            3 cents per lb.
Lavender                               Dried Flowers                       50 cents per lb.
Georgia Bark                         Inner bark dried                    20 cents per lb.
May Apple                            Dried Root                            30 cents per lb.
Ginsing                                  Dried Root                            30 cents per lb.
Blackberry                             Dried Root                             5 cents per lb.
Seneka Snake Root               Dried Root                            75 cents per lb.
Puccoon Root                        Dried Root                            30 cents per lb.
Hardhack                               Plant                                       5 cents per lb.
Marsh Rosemary                    Leaves                                  20 cents per lb.
Mustard                                 Seed                                       30 cents per lb.
Snake Root                            Dried Root                             75 cents per lb.
Sarsaparilla                            Dried Root                             30 cents per lb.
Fever Root                            Dried Root                             30 cents per lb.
Slippery Elm                       { Dried Bark freed from
                                         
{ outer coarse bark                     5 cents per lb.
Arnica                                   Dried Flowers                        75 cents per lb.
Bene                                     Seed                                      20 cents per lb.
New Jersey Tea                    Dried Leaves                         15 cents per lb.
Potato Fly                          { Killed by throwing into
                                         
{ boiling water for a few
                                         
{ minutes, and then dried
                                         
{ in the sun                              $2 per lb.
Castor Oil Bean                 { Hulled                                   $7 per bush.
                                        
{ In hull                                    $3 per bush.
Apples                                 Dried                                    $2 per bush.
Peaches                               Dried                                    $3 1/2 per bush.
Pumpkins                             Dried                                    $1 per bush.
Okra                                    Dried                                    $4 per bush.
Sumac                                  Leaves, Bark, Root                5 cents per lb.
Marsh Mallow                      Root                                      30 cents per lb.
               
The above named articles, if carefully gathered and dried in the shade, will be purchased at the Medical Purveyor's Office in Columbia, S.C.
                                                                                               
J. J. Chisolm,
                                                               
Surgeon and Medical Purveyor C. S. A.
July 7                                                                                                                      tuS   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, July 29, 1863, p. 3, c. 6-7 

List of Indigenous Plants Wanted at This Department.

                                                        Confederate States of America, Medical Purveyor's Office,   }               
                                                                                     Montgomery, Ala., July 11, 1863.            }

            Botanical Name            Common Name      Part Used                             Price
Asarum Canadense                    Wild Ginger           Dried Root                     30 cts. per lb.
Capsicum,                                  Red Pepper           Dried Pods                    25   do     do
Conium Maculatum                    Hemlock                {Dried Leaves               15     do     do                    
                                                                               {Seed,                           30     do     do
Cornus Floridae,                         Dogwood,            {Inner bark freed from wood                
                                                                               {and coarse outer bark and                       
                                                                               {well dry                        10     do     do
Columbo                                                                  Dried Root                    30     do     do
Calamus                                                                   Do                                20     do     do
Eupatorium Perfollatum              Boneset                  Leaves and Flowers      15     do     do
Euphorbia Ipecacuanhae            Ipecacuahane Spurge Dried Root                 50     do     do
Gentiana Catesbei                     American Gentian     Do                                25     do     do
Gillena Trifoliata                         Indian Physic           Do                                30     do     do
Geiseminum                               Yellow Jasmine        Root                             10     do     do
Hyosclamus Niger                      Henbane,                {Leaves,                        25     do     do                    
                                                                                {Seed,                           30     do     do
Humulus Lupulus                         Hops                      Dried Flowers                1 dollar     do
Juglans Cinerea                           Butternut,                Dried Bark and Root    10 cents     do
Liriodendron                               Tulip or Poplar Tree,{Dried inner bark freed from                 
                                                                                  {wood and coarse bark 3    do     do
Laevendulse                                Lavender                 Dried Flowers              50     do     do
Pinckneya Pubens                       Georgia Bark           Inner Bark dried           20     do     do
Prunus Virginiana                        Wild Cherry             Dried Bark,                    5      do     do
Podophyllum Peltatum                 May Apple              Dried Root,                  80     do     do
Panex Quinquefolium                  Ginseng                           Do                        30     do     do
Rubus Villosus                            Blackberry                      Do                          5      do     do
Senega                                       Seneca Snakeroot            Do                       75     do     do
Sanguinaria Canadensis              Puccoon Root,                 Do                        30     do     do
Spiroea Tomentosa                    Hardhack                         Hardhack,              5      do     do
Statice Caroliniana                     Marsh  Rosemary             Leaves,                 20     do     do
Sinapis                                       Mustard                           Seed,                    30     do     do
Serpentariae                               Snakeroot                       Dried Root             75     do     do
Sarsaparilla                                                                        Do                         80     do     do
Triosteum Perfoliatum                 Fever Root                      Do                          20     do     do
Ulmus                                        Slippery Elm                    Dried Bark freed from            
                                                                                         outer coarse bark      5      do     do
Arnica                                                                               Dried Flowers         75      do     do
Sesamum                                   Bene                                Seed                       20     do     do
Dried Apples                                                                                                    $2 per bushel
Dried Peaches                                                                                                  $3.50     do
Dried Pumpkin                                                                                                 $1         do
Dried Okra,                                                                                                     $5     do
Rhus Glabrum                            Sumach                            Leaves, Bark and Root                          
            Marsh Mallow,              Root,                           
            Potato Fly,                                                                                           $2 per pound,             
            Castor Oil Beans (hulled),                                                                     $7 per bushel,             
                     Do     (not hulled),                                                                        $3 per bushel,
The within named articles, if carefully gathered and dried in the shade, will be purchased at the Medical Purveyor's office in Montgomery, Ala.                                          W. H. Anderson,                    
            Surgeon and Medical Purveyor, C. S. A.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, August 5, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Wanted to Purchase—Red Pepper and black Mustard Seed.
Howard Smith,
Medical Purveyor, C. S. A., Dept. Trans. Miss.
Office over Cramer & Wolf's
   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, August 13, 1863, p. 2, c. 4 
            Jamestown Weed.—In collecting medical plants, (remarks the Charleston Courier,) attention should now be particularly directed to the "Datura Stramonium," or Jamestown weed.  It is now in perfection.  The whole plant should be taken up and dried in the shade.  Every portion of the plant is medicinal.  When the fruit is mature and the pod dries, the seed should be saved.  This whole plant is narcotic, and can be made to take the place of opium for many purposes, so as to save that now expensive article.  For all external applications, for the relief of local pain, in rheumatic affections, irregular spasm and cramps, bruises and sprains, the Stramonium can be used to great advantage.—Every part of the plant has been long known and used in asthma, dried and smoked in the common pipe.  In dressing wounds, great relief is often given by using an infusion of the Stramonium—either of the green or dry plant—instead of water; and in painful injury, where the part can easily be put into the infusion, particularly where it can be borne warm, the relief is often immediate.  It is believed also to exert a decided influence upon the irritability of the nerves of a wounded part, and thus to diminish the chance of tetanus and of erysipelas.  The surgeon has long known the value of Stramonium ointment.  The infusion is advantageous in keep [keeping] off flies. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
Poppy Plant.--The cultivation of the poppy plant being one of great importance, we remind our readers that the time for sowing the seed is now at hand; and those persons intending to cultivate should get the seed into the ground as early as possible.  The seed sown in September will yield treble the amount of opium to that sown in March.  One acre properly cultivated will yield _fifty pounds_ of opium.  Any of our friends having in their possession more seed than they intend to sow, will oblige us to forward to our Office, or to the Medical Purveyor in this city, for distribution, as much as they can spare.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
Honey.—A correspondent says that the Medical Director of Ewell's corps, a successful surgeon and practitioner, has discovered by frequent trial, that honey, applied by a light brush or other convenient means of the kind, is a most effectual remedy to prevent fly blows in wounds.  It is at the same time very soothing and grateful to the wounded part; and as this question has often been discussed during the war, hospital nurses and those entrusted with the care of the wounded soldier, should preserve the recollection of this simple and convenient remedy.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], September 30, 1863, p. 3, c. 4
                Useful information.--In the absence of quinine, an effective substitute may be found in red pepper tea and table salt--say a table spoonful of salt to a pint of tea--which will answer every purpose for chills.--Commence some hours before chill time, and drink copiously of the beverage.  It never fails to keep off the chill.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, September 30, 1863, p. 4, c. 5 
            In the absence of quinine, an effective substitute would perhaps be acceptable to some of your readers.  Red pepper tea and table salt answer every purpose for chills.  Say a table spoonful of salt to a pint of tea, commencing some hours before shill time, and drinking copiously of the beverage, never fails to keep off the chill.  This I have from an intelligent physician, who uses it among the whites as well as the blacks of his own family.  Several of his neighbors have employed the same remedy with complete success.                                   Iter.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, September 30, 1863, p. 4, c. 5 
            Cure for the Lockjaw.—A young lady ran a nail into her foot recently.  The injury produced lockjaw of such a malignant character that her physician pronounced her recovery hopeless.  An old nurse then took her in hand, and supplied powdered beet roots to her foot, removing them as often as they became dry.  The result was a complete and astonishing cure.  Such a simple remedy should be borne in mind.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, October 1, 1863, p. 2, c. 1 
            In the absence of quinine, an effective substitute would perhaps be acceptable to some of your readers.  Red pepper tea and table salt answer every purpose for chills.  Say a table spoonful of salt to a pint of tea, commencing some hours before chill time, and drinking copiously of the beverage, never fails to keep off the chill.  This I have from an intelligent physician, who uses it among the whites as well as the blacks of his own family.  Several of his neighbors have employed the same remedy with complete success.  

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], October 9, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
                An Effectual Cure for the Earache.  Take a small piece of cotton batting or wool, make a depression in the center with the end of the finger, and fill it with as much pulverized black pepper as will rest on a half-dime.  Gather it into a ball and tie it up; dip the ball into sweet oil, and insert it into the ear, covering the latter with cotton wool and use a bandage or cap to retain it in its place.  A most instant relief will be experienced, and the application is so gentle that an infant will not be injured by it, but experience relief as well as adults.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], October 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 4

General Directions for Collecting and Drying Medicinal Substances
of the Vegetable Kingdom.

                From Dr. F. P. Porcher's "Botanical Resources."

Directions for Collecting.

                All leaves, flowers and herbs should be preferably gathered in clear, dry weather, in the morning, after the dew is exhaled.
    
           The roots of medicinal plants, although more advantageously gathered at certain periods, to be hereafter specified, do not lose their medicinal virtues in consequence of being dug in mid-summer.  It is probably that most of those imported are thus collected by savages, or ignorant persons, when the plant is in full leaf, it being then more easily recognized.
Plants, annual, should be gathered at the time when their vegetation is more vigorous, which is generally from the time they begin to flower until their leaves begin to change.
    
           Plants, biennial, should, in most instances, be gathered in the second season of their growth, and about the time of flowering.
    
           Roots of annuals are to be gathered just before the time of flowering.
     
          Roots of biennials are to be gathered after the vegetation of the first year has ceased.
    
           Roots of perennials are to be gathered in the spring; before vegetation has commenced.  Roots should be washed, and the smaller tubers, unless they are the part expoyed [sic], should be then separated from the body of the root, which, when of any considerable size, is to be cut in slices previous to being dried.
    
           Bulbs are to be gathered after the new bulb is perfected, and before it has begun to vegetate, which is at the time the leaves decay.  Those which are to be preserved fresh should be buried in dry sand.
Barks, whether of the root, trunk or branches, should be gathered in the autumn, or early in the spring.  The dead epidermis or outer bark, and the decayed parts, should be removed.  On some trees (as the elm) the inner bark only is preserved.
    
           Leaves are to be gathered after their full development, before the fading of the flowers.  The leaves of biennials do not attain their perfect qualities until the second year.
    
           Flowers should, in general, be gathered at the time of their expansion, before or immediately after they have fully opened; some--as the Rosa Gallica--while in bud.
    
           Aromatic herbs are to be gathered when in flower.
    
           Stalks and twigs should be collected in autumn.
    
           Seeds should be collected at the period of their full maturity. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Mr. Camp, of Navasota, has presented us with a bottle of Castor Oil of his own manufacture.  We have not yet tested its quality, but those who have say it is a good article.  We know of no article of domestic manufacture so much needed, and Mr. Camp is certainly supplying a great desideratum both to the country and the army.  His enterprise will doubtless be well rewarded.   

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, November 18, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Plant Opium.

            Dr. R. E. Fullerton having had large experience during the last seven years in the successful cultivation of opium, has invented an improved mode of gathering it, by which one hand can gather more than forty hands can collect by the old, slow and tedious process of incisions and scraping.  He wishes to engage, on very favorable terms, in the cultivation of Opium with planters who have very fertile lands and an abundance of manure or cotton seed, either rotted or unrotted.  Those who wish to engage should apply forthwith, as now is the planting season.  Seed, with all necessary instructions, will be furnished.  Planters can cultivate and gather from 10 to 30 acres without materially interfering with other crops.  It is a very important, interesting and very lucrative business.         
            Also, we will pay in money, opium, laudanum, or paregoric, for any amount, large or small, of poppy, anise, or sweet fennel seed.  Ladies having collected such seed from their flower gardens will do an act of patriotism by responding to this call, as we will take a contract to furnish the Government with Opium.  My Opium is, in morphia, twice as rich as many samples of imported Opium which now command $120 per pound.        
            We already have effected arrangements with planters to plant about sixty acres, and wish to get contracts for about as much more.  Opium is a crop which, when ready, must be gathered immediately, or it is lost, and therefore it is that very little success has attended the usual mode of obtaining it.      
            Persons wishing to engage should address immediately Dr. R. E. Fullerton, Demopolis, Alabama, or call for him at the Railroad Hotel, Demopolis, on Wednesdays or Saturdays, between the hours of 11 o'clock A.M., and 2 P.M.  And those having the above named seed to spare, will confer a great favor by informing him of the same, and for which they shall be liberally compensated. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 25, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
               
A Substitute for Quinine.—A New Orleans refugee, now residing in Mobile, whilst on a visit to this section some two or three weeks ago, informed us that Dr. McFarland—one of the oldest and most distinguished physicians of New Orleans, who died in that city since the commencement of the war—had discovered what he considered a most valuable substitute for quinine, and expressed a short time before his death, his deep regret that he should not live long enough to see it tested throughout the Confederacy.  The substitute is the leaves of the Balsam Apple, to be steeped for three or four days in a bottle of whiskey.  Dose—one table spoonful three times a d ay.—Greensboro' Beacon. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
               
Cure for Itch.—That almost intolerable complaint, the camp itch, may be speedily and effectually relieved by the acetate of copper.  This can be prepared by placing a copper cent, or any other piece of copper, in a small quantity (say two table spoonsfuls) of strong vinegar for some twenty-four hours.  Then apply to the parts affected three or four times a day, each morning washing them with fine soap and water.

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 5
               
Castor Oil.—Mr. I. M. Camp has shown us a most beautiful article of castor oil, of his own manufacture.  It could not be distinguished from the best imported article in appearance, and we cannot entertain a doubt but that its quality is equally good.  Mr. Camp deserves the thanks of the public for his enterprise.  He has spent much time and money in bringing this article to its present perfection.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 28, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Substitute for Quinine.--An Article in the Medical and Surgical Journal is devoted to "the External Application of Oil of Turpentine as a substitute for Quinine in Intermittent Fever."  Surgeon Kennedy reports the successful trial of this application, without failure, in over thirty cases.  Of seven cases reported at the General Hospital Guyton, Ga., the result was immediately successful in all, but in three of the cases the chills returned afterwards.  The mode of application recommended is:  "Half an hour before the expected paroxysm, a bandage wet with the turpentine, is applied around the body at the lower part of the chest, the linen replaced and the outside clothing buttoned.  If convenient, the patient should be placed in blankets.   When there is a probability of the return of the paroxysm on the seventh or fourteenth day, the application should be repeated.
   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, February 4, 1864, p. 2, c. 4

New Goods.

            We are receiving the following Goods:  . . . Mustard, Calomel, Blue Mass, Morphine, quinine, Castor Oil, Indigo, Rhubarb, Dovers Powders, . . . all of which will be sold as low as the present high prices will justify.  Persons purchasing liquid medicines must furnish Bottles or Vials.            
            Burge & Daffin.  
Grove Hill, Feb. 2. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 17, 1864, p. 2, c. 3-4
    
           A Styptic which will stop the bleeding of the largest wound.--Scrape fine two dramchs [sic?] of  Castile Soap, and dissolve in two ounces of Brandy or common spirits.  Mix well with it one drachm of Potash and keep it in a close phial.  When [tear] plied, warm it and dip in pledgets [sic?] of lint.  The blood will suddenly coagulate some distance within the vessel.  For deep wounds and amputated limbs, repeated applications may be necessary.--Rebel.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, February 25, 1864, p. 1, c. 5

Just Received.

            Factory Thread, . . . Morphine, Alum, Camphor, Cook's Pills, Dover's Powders, Laudanum, Paregoric, & other Medicines, all of which will be sold as low as the late advance in all goods will justify.  
Feb 24, '64                                Burge & Daffin. 

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, March 8, 1864, p. 1, c. 5          
            Smoke for the Cure of Wounds.—A correspondent of the Country Gentleman recommends smoke as a cure for wounds in men and animals.  He says:   
            I cut my foot with an axe.  The lady of the house, seizing the foot while it was yet bleeding freely, held it over a pan containing smoking ham hocks.  In a few minutes the bleeding stopped, and the smoke was removed, and a bandage applied to protect it from accidental blows.  The wound never suppurated, and consequently never pained me.  I have seen the remedy tried in many similar cases, and always with the same results.  Let the reader bear in mind that no liniment or salve, drawing or healing should be supplied.  You have merely to [illegible] the wound well, and nature will do the rest.           
            I suppose that smoke of burning wood would produce the same results, but it would not be so manageable.  There is a principle in the smoke of wood, which when applied to the flesh, coagulates the albumen, thus rendering it susceptible of putrefaction.  The same principle stops bleeding by coagulating the blood.  It promotes healing, and may be applied with decided benefit to almost all ulcers, wounds, and cutaneous diseases. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 16, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
Ed. News.—Having suffered from vaccination with the impure vaccine matter so extensively circulated over the country, and experimented until I found a successful remedy, you will please publish it for the benefit of those suffering.  Take sage leaves and vinegar, boil together, thicken with corn meal, and make poultice, apply to the wound for three days and nights, changing morning and night for fresh one, and treat constitutionally as follows:  Take 1 tablespoonful sulphur, 1 do of cream tartar, mixed with molasses, every other morning, and every other morning a dose of salts and cream tartar.  When the poultice is changed, the sore should be washed with camphor.  This course faithfully followed will cure the worst arm in the State in less than one week.
               
Yours, &c.,                                                                            O. A. McGinnis
Moscow, Texas, Feb. 27th, 1864.
 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], March 30, 1864, p. 3, c. 2

Blackberry Wine.

                Mr. John H. Colt has presented us with a bottle of blackberry wine, in which he used sorghum syrup instead of sugar.  The syrup should be used according to taste; but care should be taken that the wine is not made too sweet.  Probably a safe rule would be to use the same quantity by weight as of sugar.  The sample before us is fully equal, if not superior, to any we have ever tasted.  This is a valuable discovery; as nothing is more useful in certain cases of sickness, than blackberry wine, and its manufacture has almost entirely ceased, on account of the scarcity of sugar.  Mr. Colt deserves the thanks of the public for the prompt manner in which he has made the discovery known.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, May 19, 1864, p. 1, c. 5

Just Received.

            Cotton Cards, . . .Laudanum, Paregoric, Calomel, Blue Mass, Ipecac, Dover's Powders, Quinine, Morphine, Salts, Sulphur, Alum, Blue Stone, Extract Logwood, Spanish Brown, Toilet Soap, &c.            
            Burge & Daffin.  
May 18, 1864. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, May 25, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Blockade Profits.

            We hear it frequently asserted that there is no profit upon cargoes brought in and sold here, and that the only profit is on the outward cargo.  Let us look at a few things where we have a chance of comparing the Nassau prices with those obtained here yesterday at auction.  We take the Nassau quotations from the Bahama Herald of the 4th: . . .      
Sulph. Quinine—Nassau, $2.25 per oz; Wilmington, $59a$80 per oz.--$25 to 36 ½ for $1 . . .         
            Now here is an average of $56 for $1, that is to say two hundred per cent on Nassau prices, allowing for exchange the full current rates, and all the articles we have quoted are, we are pretty sure, included among the articles not prohibited.  It will not do to say that at these prices goods will not be brought in, or that the profits are not sufficiently remunerative to tempt capitalists to take the risk.  The venture is a paying one both ways, and would be so were prices lowered one half.—Wilmington Journal.  

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 25, 1864, p. 3, c. 4
                A Remedy for Congestive Chills.--"The Mother of a soldier" has sent to the Petersburg Express a remedy for congestive chills, which she has never known to fail.  She has (she says) for a number of years been managing a large boarding school, and has had some experience n nursing.
    
           The remedy is spirits of turpentine, give from ten to fifteen drops, in syrup or toddy--rub the spine, chest and extremities well, adding a small quantity of oil of turpentine to prevent blistering.  The extremities should be rubbed until re-action takes place.  A cloth saturated with the mixture should be applied to the chest.

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, June 1, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
Drugs & Medicines--J. J. Beech, on Pecan Street, has just received a selected stock of staple goods [?] and Medicines, direct from Monterey.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 30, 1864, p. 2, c. 2          
            Send Rose Leaves.—Surgeon J. J. Chisolm, Medical Purveyor at Columbia, S. C., has requested the papers to ask contributions of rose leaves from the ladies of the Confederacy.  All the blue pills required for the army has been from last summer's contributions, and the medical department would be again under obligations to the ladies if they would assist in collecting these, to be used in manufacturing medicines for our sick soldiers. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 6, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Blackberry Wine and Vinegar.

                We find in an exchange some useful hints about making blackberry wine and vinegar.  Here they are:

Blackberry  Wine.

                The blackberry contains a very large quantity of juice, but it is contained in numerous small cells, all of which must be broken in order to effect its perfect liberation.  This may be done by rubbing the berries in a tub with a wooden pestle if no better means are at hand, though a wine press might no doubt be used to great advantage.  The berries should be ripe, fresh and clean to make the nicest product.
    
           Taken them as many ripe, fresh and clean blackberries as you please, and, as fast as y you rub them up so as to break the cells, throw them into a vat or tub of sufficient size to hold all you propose to use at one time.  When they are thus prepared, add to the whole mass the quantity of sugar you intend to use.  Ordinary brown sugar will do very well, and the proportions may be from half a pound to two pounds for each gallon of berries.  If you desire a very light wine of the claret order, use very little sugar--if a stronger, heavier, bodied wine, use more but be careful not to use too much, or you will have a supply of cordial and not wine.  According to experience two pounds is the extreme limit.  It is very probable a good light wine may be without any sugar at all, but this we have not tried.
    
           Having mixed the sugar with the berries, then add for each gallon of berries, one quart of boiling water, and stir the whole well together.  The heat thus communicated to the mass will cause a fermentation to commence without the use of yeast or any other substance whatever.  After standing about twenty-four hours, the seeds and skins will most of them rise to the top and may be skimmed off, and the clear liquid may be drawn off into the casks or other vessels destined to receive it.
    
           The vessels containing the wine should now be removed into a cool cellar or vault, and nothing remains to be done but to allow the vinous fermentation to go through its regular course.  This it will do in the course of three or four weeks, and the vessels may then be stopped or bunged up.--We have lost two five gallon demijohns by putting in the stoppers too soon.  They exploded and went to pieces.
    
           Wine made in this way will keep well without bottling.  Any family, therefore, that can have access to berries--and almost every farmer's family can obtain them--may have a five, ten, or forty gallon cask of excellent wine--worth ten times the same quantity of cider, and a great deal better than the foreign wines which--at a very small cost of money and labor.

Blackberry Vinegar.

                Do not throw away the seeds and skins after drawing off the must.  Pour warm water over these until they are entirely covered, and let them stand in an open vessel three or four days.--Then draw off the liquid and let that stand until the acetous fermentation takes place.  A small quantity of coarse sugar or molasses will hasten the process.  In this way a most excellent article of wine vinegar may be obtained; and those who have used the delectable stuff commonly sold under the name of vinegar, will consider the quantity thus obtained from the blackberries worth more than the cost of all the materials used for making both the wine and vinegar.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, July 7, 1864, p. 1, c. 5

On Sale.

            Good Cotton Cards $60 and $65; . . . Alum, Salts, Calomel, Ipecac, Morphine, Quinine, Cream of Tartar, Mustard, Castor Oil, Jalap, Rhubarb, Blue Mass, Fancy Soap, Soda, &c.                       
            Burge & Daffin.  
July 7, 1864. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, July 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
                Drugs and Chemicals--In another column will be found the advertisement of Koester & Tolle, of New Braunfels, to which we invite the special attention of all who wish to procure a pure article in drugs or chemicals.  We have been well acquainted with this establishment for many years and have had repeatedly, since we came to Austin, to send there for things we could get no where else in the State.  Dr. Koester, has been a practicing physician for over twenty years in Texas, and is familiar with the drugs and medicines most in use in this country; besides the firm is extensively engaged in manufacturing alcohol, and medical liquors, the quality of which we have had frequent opportunities of testing.  It is the only establishment in the State, at this time, that we know of where a full and complete stock of chemicals is always kept on hand, from which orders wholesale and retail can be filled.  Having a large amount of capital invested in the business, and an agent in Mexico, especially employed to make purchases for them, they are also able to offer their goods at lower prices, than have been usually charged since the war commenced.
 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, July 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 5

Drugs, Chemicals, &C.

                The undersigned have received a large supply of DRUGS, CHEMICALS, &c. from Mexico, carefully selected there by a professional man, sent there expressly for that purpose, which they are selling at comparatively moderate prices.  Among other things, they have on hand--
                Ether, Opium, Iodine, Iodide Potash, English Calomel, Blue Mass, Nitrate of Silver, Copaiva, Gum Camphor, Quinine, Chloroform, Morphine, Copperas, Chlorate of Potash, Spirits of Hartshorn, Soda, Epsom Salts, Castor Oil, Dover's Powders, Rhubarb, Strychnine, Cream of Tartar, Borax, Carb. of Magnesia, Wright's Pills, &c. &c.
                The undersigned have also always on hand Pure Strong Alcohol, which they manufacture at their own distillery.
                                                                                                               
Koester & Tolle.
New Braunfels, July 6, 1864
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, August 31, 1864, p. 2, c. 6

A Cure for Diarrhoea.

            Numerous requests having been made to republish the receipt for diarrhoea and cholera symptoms, which we gave in our paper some weeks ago, and which was used by the troops during the Mexican war with great success.  We give it below, with a very important correction of an error made in the first formula, as to the size of the dose to be given.  
Laudanum                                             2 ounces.  
Spirits Camphor                                    2 ounces.  
Essence Peppermint                              2 ounces.  
Hoffman's Anodyne                               2 ounces.  
Tincture of Cayenne Pepper                   2 drachms  
Tincture of Ginger                                  1 ounce. 
            Mix all together.  Dose—a teaspoon full in a little water, or a half teaspoon full, repeated in an hour afterwards, in a tablespoon full of brandy.  This preparation will check diarrhoea in ten minutes, and abate other premonitory symptoms of cholera immediately.  In cases of cholera it has been used with great success, to restore reaction, by outward application.—Inq.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, August 31, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Valuable Recipes.  

Substitute for Quinine.

            In the absence of quinine, an effective substitute would perhaps be acceptable to some of our readers.  Red pepper tea and table salt answers every purpose for chills.  Say a table spoonful of salt to a pint of tea, commencing some hours before shill time, and drinking copiously of the beverage, never fails to keep off the chills. this is from an intelligent physician, who uses it very successfully in his practice.  

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 6, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Confederate Medicines.--A medical friend informs us in a brief note, that during a recent casual visit to the office of Surgeon General Moore, a day or two since, he was equally surprised and delighted to find a cabinet filled with choice extracts and preparations of various medicinal substances, mineral as well as vegetable.  Many of these articles were with difficulty to be procured here before the war.  They are prepared at the C. S. Laboratory, in South Carolina, and for neatness of preparation and general "getting up," will compare favorably with the best English and French preparations of similar character.  Many of them, our correspondent says, are of Southern growth, as well as of Southern manufacture; indeed, exclusively Southern, as they are not found growing north of the Potomac.
               
Even in this can our sunny land claim superiority--rich in all mineral and vegetable productions, as she is, we will shortly be able to claim a Pharmacopoeia of our own, and be in this, as in everything else, independent.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 27, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
Infallible cure for toothache.--To a tablespoonful of any kind of spirits add the same quantity of sharp vinegar and a teaspoonful of common salt; mix them well together; hold the liquid in the mouth so that it can enter the cavity or hollow of the tooth; it will give almost instantaneous relief, without any increase of pain.
 

ALBANY [GA.] PATRIOT, November 3, 1864, p. 2, c. 5
                Wanted.  1000 bushels "Castor Oil Beans," for which the highest price will be paid.  Asher Ayres, Ag't S. C. Chemical Works.  October 13th, 1864. 

ALBANY [GA.] PATRIOT, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
                More New Goods at Welch's Drug Store, for Family Use. 
               
Medicines.  Opium, Morphine, Quinine, Gum Camphor, Castor oil, Epsom Salts, Blistering Cerate, Lunar Caustic, Magnesia, Gum Arabic, Alcohol. Rye Whiskey, &c.  And everything in the medicinal line to be bought in the market for sale.  At the Drug Store of L. E. Welch.  Albany, Nov. 10, 1864. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 28, 1864, p. 2, c. 7
               
Radish Seed.—A friend informs us that in a case of sickness, where a blister was required, he found the radish seed pounded up as good as mustard.—Macon (Miss.) Beacon.
 

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, December 29, 1864, p. 1, c. 4

Cotton Cards for $2 60!

            We have on hand a superior article of English Cards, on good backs, and larger than the Whittemore, at the above price in specie.         
            Also, . . . Medicines, Hair Pins, and various other articles.            
            Burge & Davvin. 
Dec. 22, 1864, 42 3t. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 9, 1865, p. 2, c. 1
               
To Cure Camp Itch.--Take a pound of fresh poke root, mash it, and boil a quarter of an hour, with water; add four pounds lard, and stew till the fibres of the root feel dry--i.e., till all the water is evaporated--then strain.  Rub at night on the afflicted parts very thinly.  Sure cure. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, January 11, 1865, p. 2, c. 4

                                                                                Drugs and Medicines.

Just received for sale at reasonable prices:
200 ounzes Sul. Quinine,
50      "  Sul. Morphine.
100 Gallons castor oil
25 pounds gum opium,
100 "         English Calomel,
100  "        Blue Mass.
100  "        Gum Arabic,
100   "       Aqua Ammonia,
50    "        Powd. Rhubarb,
50    "        Cayenne Pepper,
50    "         Merc. Ointment
Cod Liver, Olive Oil;, &c.
                                                                               
F. T. Duffau
Jan. 11                                                                    Congress Avenue, Austin. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 13, 1865, p. 1, c. 1
               
Cure of Corns.--A correspondent of the London Lancet recommends the use of caustic in case of corns.  He says:
               
I applied it (the lunar caustic) thus:  I put my feet in warm water, and allowed them to remain till I found the outer surface of the corn was soft; I then dried the feet, and applied the caustic all over the corn--in a few minutes it was dry.  It remained so ten days, when I removed the black skin and applied the caustic again; and I continued until I had eradicated the corns completely.  I have tried the same plan with many of my patients; and those who have been sufferers for years--all have been cured.  It produces no pain, nor the least inconvenience, and does away with the necessity of cutting, which is dangerous in itself, and likely to produce extensive inflammation, with frequently the loss of life.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, January 27, 1865, p. 1, c. 1

To Country Traders.

. . . French Quinine, six dollars per oz. . . .
Orders with cash will receive prompt attention.                      
            James Burke.  
Houston, Jan. 27, 1865.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 15, 1865, p. 4, c. 1      
            A letter dated Matamoros, February 25th, says:  "Goods are daily falling in this market. . . .  Quinine, best French, $3 per ounce; . . .  I have filled a bill at these prices. 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, March 17, 1865, p. 2, c. 5          
            Camp Itch.—By Assistant Surgeon S. R. Chambers.—Having lately read several theses upon a disease peculiar in the army, known as "Camp Itch," and believing it to be the duty of every medical officer to make known his experience in the treatment of the disease, especially as there is such a difference of opinion among the profession as to the proper treatment, I do not presume to offer my treatment as a "specific," but certify that it has never failed in my hands to accomplish a cure, or also in the hands of several of my "confreres," to whom I have given it, for trial.  It is composed of the following articles, viz:  
The inner bark of the elder                                    1 pound  
Water                                                                   2½ pts.      
            Boil the bark down to one quarter of a pint, then add  
Lard                                                                    1 pound  
Sweet Gum                                                          4 ounces.            
            Evaporate the water, and at the same time skim whatever filth may rise to the top of the vessel, after which set it aside to cool.  When thoroughly cool, add:  
Basilicon Ointment                                               2 ounces  
Olive Oil                                                              3 ounces  
Sulphur Flour                                                       ½ ounce  
            The mode of applying this ointment is as follows:  First, make the patient wash well with soap and water, dry the parts affected, rub the ointment on the parts affected with the hand until it is absorbed.  Repeat this twice a day, omitting the last, which is only done previous to the first application.            
            I also recommend that the patient, in the worst form of the disease, wear the same under-clothing one week, as the clothes necessarily will absorb the ointment, thereby saving the patient the trouble of applying it more frequently.  In ordinary cases this treatment will cure in one week; the more severe cases will take longer.  Were it necessary, I could furnish the reports of over one hundred cases that I have treated in this way, and in every case with perfect success.  

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, April 5, 1865, p. 1, c. 5

                                                                Drugs!  Drugs!! Drugs!!!

A fresh supply just imported, consisting in part of the following--
French quinine, morphine, opium, Eng. and Am.  Calomel, Eng. codliver oil, Am. Arrow root, raw ginger, prescription vials, Jayne's expectorant, Radway's R.  R., Brown's Essence Jamaica ginger, Allcock's plaster, Brandreth's pills, Wright's Indian vegetable pills, Bull's sarsaparilla, mexican mustang liniment, Cherokee liniment, lobelia seed, ergotine, extract of colocynth, sweet spirits of nitre, spirits ammonia, etc. etc.  We constantly keep as much assorted as the times will allow.                               Koester & Tolle.
New Braunfels, (Comal Co.), March 23, 1863.